Making (Lots of) NK Cells
Making (Lots of) NK Cells 1024 649 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

When Dean Lee, MD, PhD, joined Nationwide Children’s and The Ohio  State University Comprehensive Cancer Center in 2016, the institutions gave him leadership of a joint program: the Cellular Therapy and Cancer Immunology Program (CTCI), which serves to develop research efforts into clinical care…

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Moving Emergency Medicine Research Forward
Moving Emergency Medicine Research Forward 1024 614 Abbie Miller

Utilizing exception from informed consent studies and a national network of emergency medicine experts, clinician-scientists are advancing research to uncover best practices and improve care. Exception from informed consent (EFIC) is a special rule set utilized by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)…

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Improving Racial Diversity and Equity in Clinical Trials
Improving Racial Diversity and Equity in Clinical Trials 1024 511 Jeb Phillips

There is now broad consensus across medicine that clinical trials must be more representative of minority populations. How can that be achieved? Last year, a group of Nationwide Children’s Hospital neonatologists published an unusually pointed critique of racial and ethnic representation in neonatal clinical…

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Engineered Viruses Help the Immune System Target Cancer Cells
Engineered Viruses Help the Immune System Target Cancer Cells 1024 623 Lauren Dembeck

The seemingly unlikely “partnership” leads to strong antitumor responses in pediatric tumor models. A recent study from researchers at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, published in the Journal for Immuno Therapy of Cancer, describes how a type of viroimmunotherapy activates the immune system to preferentially target…

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SARS-CoV-2 RNA in the Blood is Associated With Worse Outcomes in Kids
SARS-CoV-2 RNA in the Blood is Associated With Worse Outcomes in Kids 1024 575 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

Researchers have identified a risk factor for more severe illness in children with COVID-19: detectable levels of SARS-CoV-2 RNA circulating in the blood. Children with detectable SARS-CoV-2 RNA in the blood, called RNAemia, were more likely to require oxygen and be admitted to the…

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Featured Researcher — Diana Thomas, MD, PhD
Featured Researcher — Diana Thomas, MD, PhD 150 150 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

Diana Thomas, MD, PhD, joined the Biopathology Center (BPC) at Nationwide Children’s Hospital as its pathology operations director in 2021. Since then, she has been busy supporting research protocol development and the receipt, processing, banking and distribution of biospecimens for clinical and research investigators…

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Multi-Disciplinary Team Develops Evidence-Based Guidelines for Acute Management of Persistent Pulmonary Hypertension in Newborns
Multi-Disciplinary Team Develops Evidence-Based Guidelines for Acute Management of Persistent Pulmonary Hypertension in Newborns 200 133 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

What began as an internal effort to simplify practice has transformed into published evidence-based guidelines to standardize care for acute stabilization and management of newborns with pulmonary hypertension.   Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN) is a highly varied and changeable condition that…

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Perceptions About Type 2 Diabetes Differ Among Adolescent Patients, Parents and Physicians
Perceptions About Type 2 Diabetes Differ Among Adolescent Patients, Parents and Physicians 1024 683 JoAnna Pendergrass, DVM

Differing perceptions about type 2 diabetes among teens, parents and physicians can create barriers to diagnosing and managing the disease.   Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is becoming increasingly prevalent in adolescents, with a median age of diagnosis of 13.5 years in the pediatric population.…

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Which Surgical Approach for Catheterizable Channels in Bowel and Bladder Management Is Best?
Which Surgical Approach for Catheterizable Channels in Bowel and Bladder Management Is Best? 150 150 Jessica Nye, PhD

Specific patient characteristics, such as appendix size, may help guide clinicians when deciding which surgical approach to use for patients in need of catheterizable channels for bladder and bowel management. Many patients with neurologic disorders experience urinary and fecal incontinence. The appendix or the…

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Improving Identification of Neonatal Acute Kidney Injury in the NICU
Improving Identification of Neonatal Acute Kidney Injury in the NICU 1024 575 Mary Bates, PhD

Approaches at three different institutions all resulted in improved identification and care of acute kidney injury in newborns. In a new study, researchers describe three different approaches to standardizing the identification and care of acute kidney injury (AKI) in the neonatal intensive care unit…

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coronavirus
COVID-19 and Neurologic Manifestations in Children
COVID-19 and Neurologic Manifestations in Children 1024 512 Marlina Lovett, MD

Just weeks after SARS-CoV-2 was identified, global consortiums were formed to combat the pandemic. Health care providers and scientists worked together to learn how SARS-CoV-2 impacted the body, to share information, to generate hypotheses and to develop treatment approaches. The Global Consortium Study of…

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What Psychosocial Interventions Are Well Established for the Treatment of Bipolar Disorder in Youth?
What Psychosocial Interventions Are Well Established for the Treatment of Bipolar Disorder in Youth? 150 150 Lauren Dembeck

Clinical psychology researchers at Nationwide Children’s Hospital recently published a comprehensive review of evidence-based psychosocial treatments for bipolar disorder in youth.  Bipolar spectrum disorders (BPSDs) are chronic, recurrent conditions characterized by episodic mood disturbance alternating between periods of depression and (hypo)mania. These conditions are…

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The Success of an EMR-Based Health-Related Social Needs Screen in Pediatrics
The Success of an EMR-Based Health-Related Social Needs Screen in Pediatrics 1024 683 Deborah L. Ungerleider, MD, FAAP

Standardized universal HRSN screening with an EMR system and follow-up by social work consults can be successful and contribute to reducing health disparities.   Health-related social needs (HRSNs), sometimes referred to as social determinants of health (SODH), are the risk factors of food insecurity,…

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Stress Increases Systemic Inflammation and Anxiety in Mouse Model of IBD
Stress Increases Systemic Inflammation and Anxiety in Mouse Model of IBD 150 150 Mary Bates, PhD

Exposure to stress did not induce a relapse in colitis in the mice. In a new study, researchers at Nationwide Children’s Hospital and the Abigail Wexner Research Institute tested whether exposure to stress would lead to flares of intestinal inflammation in a mouse model…

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Practical, At-Home Parasacral Nerve Stimulation for Overactive Bladder in Children
Practical, At-Home Parasacral Nerve Stimulation for Overactive Bladder in Children 150 150 Mary Bates, PhD

A new regimen for parasacral transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is manageable and results in subjective improvements, though objective improvements were modest. In a new study, researchers from Nationwide Children’s evaluated the effectiveness of a practical, at-home regimen of parasacral transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation…

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Featured Researcher — Tracy Bedrosian, PhD
Featured Researcher — Tracy Bedrosian, PhD 150 150 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

Tracy Bedrosian, PhD, is a principal investigator in the Steve and Cindy Rasmussen Institute for Genomic Medicine and a specialist in brain mosaicism and neurodevelopment working to uncover the impact that localized mutations in brain cells have on epilepsy symptoms, autism and other neurodevelopmental…

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First Multicenter, Prospective Study of Surgical Approach and Short-term Outcomes in Patients Undergoing Total Pancreatectomy With Islet Autotransplantation
First Multicenter, Prospective Study of Surgical Approach and Short-term Outcomes in Patients Undergoing Total Pancreatectomy With Islet Autotransplantation 150 150 Lauren Dembeck

The goal of the prospective study is to critically evaluate current clinical practices to determine which should be adopted or abandoned. It will also provide an opportunity to evaluate patients’ quality of life after total pancreatectomy with islet autotransplantation.   For children and adults…

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Researchers Classify High-Risk Variants in Lamin A/C Cardiac Disease Using Machine Learning
Researchers Classify High-Risk Variants in Lamin A/C Cardiac Disease Using Machine Learning 1024 575 Lauren Dembeck

A recent study from researchers at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, published in Heart Rhythm, describes how a LMNA variant of unknown significance was identified as high-risk using family histories, genomic analysis and machine learning. “Genetic variants in LMNA are well known to cause a spectrum…

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Exploring the RNA Cargo of Extracellular Vesicles in Malignant Pediatric Brain Tumors
Exploring the RNA Cargo of Extracellular Vesicles in Malignant Pediatric Brain Tumors 150 150 JoAnna Pendergrass, DVM

The RNA cargo within the extracellular vesicles of medulloblastoma and diffuse infiltrative pontine glioma can provide valuable insight into diagnosing and treating these malignant pediatric brain tumors. Recent studies have shed light on extracellular vesicles’ ability to use their cargo, which includes small noncoding…

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The Importance of Body Composition in Cystic Fibrosis
The Importance of Body Composition in Cystic Fibrosis 150 150 Mary Bates, PhD

Lean mass deficits are common in pediatric patients with cystic fibrosis and associated with impaired lung and bone health. Now, experts are calling for increased use of body composition measurements in clinical care.  In cystic fibrosis — a multisystem disorder characterized by progressive lung…

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Could a Sequence-Specific Splice Switching Oligonucleotide and Antibody Therapy Combination Successfully Treat Rhabdomyosarcoma?
Could a Sequence-Specific Splice Switching Oligonucleotide and Antibody Therapy Combination Successfully Treat Rhabdomyosarcoma? 1024 683 Jessica Nye, PhD

Blocking alternative splicing may be a viable therapeutic intervention strategy for reducing tumor growth in rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS).   RMS is the most common pediatric soft tissue sarcoma and is associated with poor prognosis, a high rate of metastasis and recurrence. RMS tumors overexpress insulin…

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Study Supports Virotherapy as a Potential Treatment for Brain Tumors
Study Supports Virotherapy as a Potential Treatment for Brain Tumors 1024 575 Nationwide Children's

A new study provides additional evidence of the efficacy of virotherapy for glioblastoma, the deadliest type of brain tumor. The research findings, published in Clinical Cancer Research, indicate that an oncolytic herpes simplex virus, G207, appears to boost immune response and that this is…

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Physical Activity Intervention May Benefit Adolescents With Congenital Heart Defects
Physical Activity Intervention May Benefit Adolescents With Congenital Heart Defects 1024 684 Mary Bates, PhD

A lifestyle intervention delivered via videoconference increased physical activity in the least active participants. In a new pilot study, researchers from Nationwide Children’s evaluated the efficacy of the Congenital Heart Disease Physical Activity Lifestyle (CHD-PAL) intervention for high school-aged adolescents with congenital heart defects.…

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Postoperative Management of Flexor Tendon Injuries in Children
Postoperative Management of Flexor Tendon Injuries in Children 150 150 Mary Bates, PhD

One month of immobilization followed by a modified Duran protocol leads to good outcomes. Pediatric flexor tendon injuries can be challenging due to children’s smaller anatomy and possible treatment nonadherence. In adults, immediate to early active motion for flexor tendon repairs has become standard,…

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Pediatric Bone Density Measures Require Adjusted Scoring for Accurate Interpretation
Pediatric Bone Density Measures Require Adjusted Scoring for Accurate Interpretation 1024 575 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

Understanding the limits of pediatric bone densitometry reports can make results more useful for clinical decision making. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, or DXA, is the standard scan used to assess bone mineral density (BMD) in children. It uses very little radiation and has extensive normative…

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Short- and Long-Term Kidney Issues in Children Treated for Leukemia
Short- and Long-Term Kidney Issues in Children Treated for Leukemia 720 480 Mary Bates, PhD

While outcomes for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have improved, researchers are finding long-term effects on kidney function that require monitoring. In a new study published recently in Pediatric Nephrology, researchers from Nationwide Children’s report the incidence of hypertension and kidney issues in pediatric…

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Epilepsy Centers in United States Expand in Size and Specialized Testing Services with Accreditation
Epilepsy Centers in United States Expand in Size and Specialized Testing Services with Accreditation 150 150 Rebecca Cybulski

Recent data is used to analyze characteristics of accredited epilepsy centers across the United States, including testing, treatment and outcomes for drug resistant epilepsy patients. New research from the Abigail Wexner Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospital has found that as a result of the increased…

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Featured Researcher — Will Ray, PhD
Featured Researcher — Will Ray, PhD 150 150 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

William C. Ray, PhD, is a principal investigator in the Battelle Center for Mathematical Medicine in the Abigail Wexner Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospital and an associate professor of Pediatrics at The Ohio State University. His work focuses on unique ways to explore,…

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Baby in NICU
What is “Normal” Thyroid Functioning in Preterm Infants?
What is “Normal” Thyroid Functioning in Preterm Infants? 1024 683 Mary Bates, PhD

Study provides one of the largest samples of thyroid values in preterm infants to establish reference intervals. Preterm infants are born with an immature hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis, putting them at risk for hypothyroidism from a delayed rise in thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). Currently in the United…

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Exploring Dopamine Genotype as a Moderator of the Effect of Parental Behavior on Children’s Self-Control
Exploring Dopamine Genotype as a Moderator of the Effect of Parental Behavior on Children’s Self-Control 150 150 Daphne Vrantsidis, PhD

Did you know developmental psychologists have found the secret to life success? It’s not eating your vegetables or doing your homework or anything else your parents or teachers told you growing up. It’s how long you waited to eat a marshmallow when you were…

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Making Exercise Part of Your Treatment Plan: Play Strong for Children With ASD
Making Exercise Part of Your Treatment Plan: Play Strong for Children With ASD 150 150 Deborah L. Ungerleider, MD, FAAP

How can clinicians use exercise in their treatment of behavioral and mental health disorders? Experts share lessons learned from the Play Strong program.   It is well-known in the medical world that exercise is good for the mind and body, both for children and…

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Top-down view of heart valves
First In Human
First In Human 1024 752 Abbie Miller

The Heart Center at Nationwide Children’s Hospital has a long history of helping to bring innovations from the lab to the patient. The latest, the Autus Valve, aims to improve care and outcomes for children with pulmonary valve disease. In December 2021, Mark Galantowicz,…

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How the Antimicrobial Protein RNase 7 Helps Prevent Urinary Tract Infections
How the Antimicrobial Protein RNase 7 Helps Prevent Urinary Tract Infections 1024 683 Mary Bates, PhD

Researchers identify genetic variation associated with severe and recurrent UTIs. A new study adds to the growing body of evidence suggesting the antimicrobial protein RNase 7 plays an important role in preventing urinary tract infections (UTIs). The findings, published in The Journal of Clinical…

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Novel Digital Storybook Intervention Aims to Support Children With Hearing Loss
Novel Digital Storybook Intervention Aims to Support Children With Hearing Loss 1024 683 Abbie Miller

Hear Me Read, invented and developed at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, is now being validated in a prospective clinical trial. For children who are deaf or hard of hearing, access to sound via hearing aids and cochlear implants and intensive speech therapy with highly trained…

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Novel Approaches to Gene Therapies for Patients With Rare Genetic Diseases
Novel Approaches to Gene Therapies for Patients With Rare Genetic Diseases 150 150 Jessica Nye, PhD

According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), nearly 7,400 diseases have been identified and classified as “rare” or “orphan” — “rare” because each afflicts fewer than 200,000 people in the United States and “orphan” because drug companies, unlikely to recoup research and development…

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smallTalk egg
Building Baby Brains With smallTalk: From Foreign Language Learning at Home to Bridging Gaps in the NICU
Building Baby Brains With smallTalk: From Foreign Language Learning at Home to Bridging Gaps in the NICU 1024 683 Jessica Nye, PhD

The best language learners on the planet are children — especially babies. Your brain is most active in creating the language center of your brain, connecting neurons and creating the highways and pathways for processing language, during infancy. In fact, language learning begins in…

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Old Drug, New Use
Old Drug, New Use 1024 575 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

Researchers have discovered an adult diabetes drug may provide a new and better way to treat children  with nephrotic syndrome.  Nephrotic syndrome is one of the most common kidney diseases seen in children. In most cases the cause is unknown. Nephrotic syndrome involves damage…

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Growing Opportunities for Tissue Engineering
Growing Opportunities for Tissue Engineering 150 150 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

A new system removes much of the expense and technical challenges surrounding cell seeding of tissue-engineered vascular grafts, making the technology more accessible to patients everywhere. One of the key challenges in congenital heart surgery is that current grafts used to correct heart defects…

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Nicole O'Brien, MD
Improving Neuro-Critical Care Outcomes for Children in Sub-Saharan Africa
Improving Neuro-Critical Care Outcomes for Children in Sub-Saharan Africa 1024 683 Abbie Miller

Nicole O’Brien, MD, is working with health experts in sub-Saharan Africa to develop Centers of Excellence for the use of transcranial doppler ultrasound (TCD).   The first time Nicole O’Brien went to Africa, she was not a doctor. In her words, she “wasn’t even…

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NCHart-1 a New Approach to Estimating Total Body Surface Area Burn Percentages
NCHart-1 a New Approach to Estimating Total Body Surface Area Burn Percentages 150 150 Abbie Miller

The new chart reduces math errors, improving accuracy for better outcomes. When a child has a burn injury, immediate care is essential. Fluid administration and treatment resources needed are decisions made in the field by emergency medical technicians (EMTs) and paramedics. Both decisions hinge…

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Girl with cast on her arm
Multiple Fractures in Children: When to Suspect Medical or Malevolent Causes
Multiple Fractures in Children: When to Suspect Medical or Malevolent Causes 1024 770 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

Rapid growth and high-risk activities during childhood leave kids ripe for repeat fracture opportunities, but key factors can alert clinicians to possible underlying disease-related fragility or non-accidental injury. Fractures are common in childhood, with up to 40% of girls and as many as 50%…

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Illustration of lungs on blue silhouette of upper chest on black background
After Lung Transplantation for Cystic Fibrosis, Migration of Stem Cells May Lead to Chimeric Phenotype
After Lung Transplantation for Cystic Fibrosis, Migration of Stem Cells May Lead to Chimeric Phenotype 1024 575 Jessica Nye, PhD

Lung transplantation (LTx) for cystic fibrosis (CF) may trigger bidirectional, long-distance migration of tissue specific stem cells (TSC), causing a chimeric phenotype which could have implications for host defense capabilities. CF is caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene and…

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Zero Suicide: A Comprehensive Framework for Pediatric Hospitals
Zero Suicide: A Comprehensive Framework for Pediatric Hospitals 1024 683 Mary Bates, PhD

Key elements of the program include leadership support, practical tools and training for staff, and a quality improvement infrastructure. Suicide is the second leading cause of death among 10- to 24-year-olds, and the number of youths presenting to pediatric hospitals for suicide-related concerns has…

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Children Testing Positive for X-ALD on Updated Newborn Screening Panels Require Long-Term Monitoring
Children Testing Positive for X-ALD on Updated Newborn Screening Panels Require Long-Term Monitoring 1024 575 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

A condition soon to be added to the Ohio Newborn Screening Panel may not affect children for years or even decades after diagnosis, and follow-up involves more than just the infant. Hospitals across the country collect a card of small drops of blood from…

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Featured Researcher — Amit Kapoor, PhD
Featured Researcher — Amit Kapoor, PhD 150 150 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

Amit Kapoor, PhD, joined Nationwide Children’s Hospital as a principal investigator in the Center for Vaccines and Immunity and The Ohio State University as an associate professor of Pediatrics in 2015. Dr. Kapoor’s lab is working to understand the immunopathogenesis of several viral pathogens…

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Iron Deficiency and Fatigue Among Adolescents With Heavy Menstrual Bleeding
Iron Deficiency and Fatigue Among Adolescents With Heavy Menstrual Bleeding 1024 673 Mary Bates, PhD

Both iron deficiency and fatigue are common in adolescents with heavy menstrual bleeding and may not indicate presence of a bleeding disorder. In a new multicenter study of nearly 200 adolescents with heavy menstrual bleeding, researchers found a high prevalence of iron deficiency without…

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Epilepsy Surgery Underutilized in Young Patients With Drug-Resistant Epilepsy
Epilepsy Surgery Underutilized in Young Patients With Drug-Resistant Epilepsy 1024 575 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

Research suggests that early surgical intervention can boost developmental outcomes and even cure young children with intractable epilepsy, but low referral rates and other barriers result in limited access for some. Early surgery for drug-resistant epilepsy (DRE) can improve quality of life by reducing…

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An Epigenetic Vulnerability for Rhabdomyosarcoma Among Children?
An Epigenetic Vulnerability for Rhabdomyosarcoma Among Children? 150 150 Jessica Nye, PhD

A deep classification of epigenetic machinery in rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) tumors finds that the mammalian SWItch/Sucrose Non-Fermentable (mSWI/SNF) complexes are essential for the stabilization of RMS.   A recent study, published in Nature Communications, by Ben Stanton, PhD, and colleagues focused on rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), a…

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4-Year Study Finds No Correlation Between Head Impacts and Cognitive Outcomes in Youth Tackle Football Players
4-Year Study Finds No Correlation Between Head Impacts and Cognitive Outcomes in Youth Tackle Football Players 1024 683 Lauren Dembeck

In the longest study of its kind, researchers studied individual players through 4 seasons of youth tackle football and found no correlation between the number or severity of head impacts and cognitive and behavioral outcomes.  When children are considering playing contact sports, parents/guardians and…

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Right Care, Right Place, Right Time? Frequency and Duration of Boarding for Pediatric Mental Health Conditions at Acute Care Hospitals
Right Care, Right Place, Right Time? Frequency and Duration of Boarding for Pediatric Mental Health Conditions at Acute Care Hospitals 150 150 Lauren Dembeck

Mental health boarding durations significantly exceed standards by the Joint Commission, and youth receive minimal mental health services in these acute care settings. This study calls for increased awareness, dedicated resources and research to improve mental health care for youths in these settings. According…

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Study Finds High Mortality Rates of Youths Previously Incarcerated in the Juvenile Legal System
Study Finds High Mortality Rates of Youths Previously Incarcerated in the Juvenile Legal System 1024 683 Rebecca Cybulski

Recent data links youth incarceration to early mortality by homicide, overdose and suicide. New research from the Abigail Wexner Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospital finds that youth aged 11 to 21 years, who have been previously incarcerated in the juvenile legal system, are 5.9…

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Ross Maltz, MD
Polyethylene Glycol 3350 Does Not Lead to Behavior Changes in Animal Model
Polyethylene Glycol 3350 Does Not Lead to Behavior Changes in Animal Model 1024 683 Mary Bates, PhD

The laxative affected stool consistency and gut bacteria but did not alter anxiety-like behavior in mice. Polyethylene glycol 3350 (PEG3350) is a laxative commonly used to treat constipation in children. Over the years, the Food and Drug Administration has received some reports of neuropsychiatric…

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Addition of a Radiation-Free Evaluation and Parent-Chosen Feeding Method Leads to Superior Outcomes for Infants With Swallowing Difficulties
Addition of a Radiation-Free Evaluation and Parent-Chosen Feeding Method Leads to Superior Outcomes for Infants With Swallowing Difficulties 150 150 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

A recent NIH-NIDDK-funded study suggests that application of novel high-resolution manometry along with guided parental involvement can improve oral feeding success for infants with swallowing difficulties. The prevalence of swallowing difficulties among neonatal intensive care graduates is increasing.  Swallowing difficulties or dysphagia in infants…

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Are Adolescents With Congenital Heart Disease Getting Enough Physically Activity?
Are Adolescents With Congenital Heart Disease Getting Enough Physically Activity? 1024 728 Mary Bates, PhD

Study reports adolescents with congenital heart disease are less physically active than recommended, with gender playing a role. In a new study, researchers at Nationwide Children’s described physical activity patterns among high school-age adolescents with congenital heart disease (CHD) in the United States. The…

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Challenges and Experiences of LGBTQI+ Parents Regarding Infant Feeding
Challenges and Experiences of LGBTQI+ Parents Regarding Infant Feeding 1024 681 Mary Bates, PhD

New study identifies challenges faced by LGBTQI+ parents, factors that can help healthcare providers improve their support. A new study is the first to explore the experiences of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer/Questioning, or Intersex, Plus (LGBTQI+) parents and identify the factors that influence…

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New Approach to Dystrophin Quantification Can Help Researchers Studying Muscular Dystrophy
New Approach to Dystrophin Quantification Can Help Researchers Studying Muscular Dystrophy 150 150 Abbie Miller

Dystrophin is the protein product of the DMD gene and plays an important role in Becker and Duchenne muscular dystrophies. Researchers in the Center for Gene Therapy at the Abigail Wexner Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospital have developed an automated, unbiased approach for…

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Creating a Physician Workforce that Reflects the Patients and Families We Serve
Creating a Physician Workforce that Reflects the Patients and Families We Serve 1024 683 Abbie Miller

Workforce disparities persist within health care institutions and medical training. While individuals who identify as Black/African American, Latinx/Hispanic, Native American, and Pacific Islander comprise roughly 30% of the U.S. population, they are less than 15% of physicians, making them underrepresented in medicine – or…

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Featured Researcher — Steve Goodman, PhD
Featured Researcher — Steve Goodman, PhD 150 150 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

Steven D. Goodman, PhD, is a principal investigator in the Center for Microbial Pathogenesis in the Abigail Wexner Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. His research centers on bacterial biofilms — interactive ecosystems of bacteria that form a structure to help the bacteria thrive…

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From 1 to 1,000: How Robotic Technology Has Brought Surgeons Together at Nationwide Children’s Hospital
From 1 to 1,000: How Robotic Technology Has Brought Surgeons Together at Nationwide Children’s Hospital 1024 683 Marc Michalsky, MD, MBA, Karen Diefenbach, MD, Molly Fuchs, MD and Daniel DaJusta, MD

This month marks an important milestone for patients receiving care at Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus, Ohio: the completion of our 1,000th minimally invasive case using the DaVinci Robotic System. Nationwide Children’s was one of the first large children’s hospitals in the country to…

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High Rate of Urologic Anomalies in Children With Anorectal Malformations
High Rate of Urologic Anomalies in Children With Anorectal Malformations 150 150 Lauren Dembeck

Early recognition of urologic problems through proactive screening and urologic collaboration may help prevent of renal deterioration and allow for timely treatment in this population.   Researchers at Nationwide Children’s Hospital have recently demonstrated that urologic anomalies occur at a high rate in children…

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Biofilm Bacteria Protected by a Form of DNA Resistant to Current Treatments
Biofilm Bacteria Protected by a Form of DNA Resistant to Current Treatments 150 150 Lauren Bakaletz, PhD and Steve Goodman, PhD

Researchers from Nationwide Children’s Hospital identify a structural component of the bacterial biofilm matrix in a novel discovery published in Cell that has strong implications as to how biofilms resist current treatments and how to create new therapeutics that will be effective.   Biofilms…

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Featured Researcher — Scott Harper, PhD
Featured Researcher — Scott Harper, PhD 150 150 Natalie Wilson

Scott Harper, PhD, is a principal investigator in the Center for Gene Therapy at the Abigail Wexner Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospital and a professor of Pediatrics at the Ohio State University College of Medicine. Dr. Harper’s primary research focus at Nationwide Children’s…

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Gene Therapy Rescues Phenotype in Preclinical Model for Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophy 2A/R1
Gene Therapy Rescues Phenotype in Preclinical Model for Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophy 2A/R1 1024 575 Abbie Miller

Replacement of CAPN3 gene via AAV-mediated gene therapy resulted in significant, robust improvements in functional outcomes and muscle physiology in the preclinical model. LGMDs are a rare form of muscular dystrophy for which there is no treatment. As a heterogenous group caused by a…

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Identifying Which Children with Nephrotic Syndrome Will Respond to Steroids
Identifying Which Children with Nephrotic Syndrome Will Respond to Steroids 1024 683 Mary Bates, PhD

New research identifies potential biomarkers in the plasma of children with steroid resistant nephrotic syndrome. Nephrotic syndrome is among the most common forms of kidney disease in children. Although glucocorticoids (i.e., steroids) are the primary treatment, approximately 10 to 20% of children with nephrotic…

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Illustration of NK Cells, T Cells, other immune cells floating across white background
Therapy With Double-Bright Natural Killer Cell Infusions Increases Response Rates Among Frail Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia
Therapy With Double-Bright Natural Killer Cell Infusions Increases Response Rates Among Frail Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia 969 533 Jessica Nye, PhD

A case series of 13 patients with relapsed/refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML) finds that a novel approach using repeated infusions of cultured natural killer (NK) cells increases overall and complete response rates. NK cells are lymphocytes – white blood cell components of the innate…

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Repeated Injury to Stem Cells Could be a Significant Contributor to Chronic Lung Disease
Repeated Injury to Stem Cells Could be a Significant Contributor to Chronic Lung Disease 1024 575 Abbie Miller

A series of experiments shows that biological aging of tracheobronchial stem cells could drive the development of chronic lung disease. In a recent publication in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine (SCTM), researchers showed that repeated injury to epithelial cells in the airway caused biological aging…

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Treating Intrauterine Opioid Exposure in Infants Born Preterm
Treating Intrauterine Opioid Exposure in Infants Born Preterm 1024 575 Deborah L. Ungerleider, MD, FAAP

We need a protocol to evaluate and treat neonatal abstinence syndrome in preterm infants. Neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) occurs when infants who are exposed to opioids in utero develop withdrawal signs and symptoms after birth.1 According to past studies, NAS occurs in 55% to…

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A Patient-Centered Medical Home for Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease
A Patient-Centered Medical Home for Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease 1024 683 Mary Bates, PhD

The Center for Pediatric and Adolescent IBD serves as a case study for comprehensive, multidisciplinary care. In a new paper published in Inflammatory Bowel Disease, researchers from Nationwide Children’s describe the multidisciplinary care model at the Center for Pediatric and Adolescent Inflammatory Bowel Disease…

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Standardizing Training in Pediatric Cardiac Critical Care
Standardizing Training in Pediatric Cardiac Critical Care 150 150 Mary Bates, PhD

In a new report, a taskforce of experts presented their recommendations to standardize training in pediatric cardiac critical care. The authors hope the report is a first step toward more oversight of training and certification in the field. The field of pediatric cardiac critical…

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Validity of the WISC-V Intelligence Testing in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder
Validity of the WISC-V Intelligence Testing in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder 1024 575 Mary Bates, PhD

Evaluating thinking and reasoning abilities for children with autism using conventional intelligence tests can be done, but with some caution. The Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, Fifth Edition (WISC-V) is one of the most widely used intelligence tests for children. However, little is known…

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Codetection of Respiratory Bacteria in Infants With RSV Infection Associated With Worse Outcomes
Codetection of Respiratory Bacteria in Infants With RSV Infection Associated With Worse Outcomes 1024 575 Lauren Dembeck

The interaction between the bacteria and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) appears to be synergistic. Researchers are now working to understand the underlying biological mechanisms. Researchers at Nationwide Children’s Hospital have discovered that codetection of Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae in the upper respiratory tract…

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Building Momentum for School-Based Health Care
Building Momentum for School-Based Health Care 150 150 Mary Kay Irwin, EdD

Pediatric health care and the United States educational system share similar goals, even if they don’t quite use the same words to describe them. Health care professionals often say they want optimal wellness for children, so they can thrive throughout their lives. Schools want…

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Additional Ventures: Investing in Congenital Heart Disease Research to Advance Care
Additional Ventures: Investing in Congenital Heart Disease Research to Advance Care 150 150 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

Additional Ventures is a purpose-driven nonprofit that has developed the Single Ventricle Research Fund (SVRF), an annual research award program dedicated to accelerating research and improving care for people with single ventricle heart defects. The fund supports investigators through multi-year, high-impact grants focused on…

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How Patient-Derived Stem Cells are Changing the Trajectory of Congenital Heart Disease Research
How Patient-Derived Stem Cells are Changing the Trajectory of Congenital Heart Disease Research 1024 683 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

Small blood samples — and the patient-specific, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) they enable — turn into valuable research material for understanding congenital cardiovascular disorders, especially when united with modern genome sequencing and editing, animal models and three dimensional tissue growth technologies. Patient-derived induced…

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Teens on the Road: How Technology, Policy and Parents Influence Driving Safety
Teens on the Road: How Technology, Policy and Parents Influence Driving Safety 1024 633 Abbie Miller

Traffic crashes are a leading cause of death in the United States. For teens, the stakes are especially high.

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Microsurgery for Acute Flaccid Myelitis: Personalized Approach Leads to Remarkable Recoveries
Microsurgery for Acute Flaccid Myelitis: Personalized Approach Leads to Remarkable Recoveries 1024 440 Lauren Dembeck

Children from around the world are coming to Nationwide Children’s for specialized care for AFM with lower extremity involvement. Dr. Amy Moore invented many of the procedures that are leading to remarkable recoveries for these patients. After an ordinary cold, most people continue with…

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2021 Bright Futures/AAP Recommendations for Preventive Pediatric Health Care (Periodicity Schedule) in color showing all of the screenings recommended across 34 patient visits through a patient's twenty-second birthday
Reconsidering Screening in Primary Care
Reconsidering Screening in Primary Care 1024 683 Jeb Phillips

Screenings are an important part of preventive care, but the growing list of recommendations is daunting. How do we prioritize the limited time we have with patients and families? There are 32 well-child primary care visits recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics in…

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Learning in Real Time to Overcome COVID-19 and MIS-C
Learning in Real Time to Overcome COVID-19 and MIS-C 1024 491 Natalie Wilson

When multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) emerged in May 2020, the new condition made headlines. Although rare, MIS-C can appear in kids about a month after they’ve recovered from infections with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19 — even if they haven’t felt…

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Lubiprostone Found to be Safe, as Effective as Placebo in Children With Constipation
Lubiprostone Found to be Safe, as Effective as Placebo in Children With Constipation 1024 680 Mary Bates, PhD

The medication, FDA-approved for adults, may benefit older pediatric patients with less of a behavioral component to their constipation. Pediatric functional constipation, though common, remains challenging to treat. Lubiprostone is a medication approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment…

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Distinct Transcriptional Regulatory Domain Identified in Ewing Sarcoma Fusion Protein
Distinct Transcriptional Regulatory Domain Identified in Ewing Sarcoma Fusion Protein 1024 1024 Lauren Dembeck

A better understanding of a newly defined region in the fusion protein that causes Ewing sarcoma may lead to novel approaches for therapeutic targeting. Ewing sarcoma is an aggressive pediatric bone cancer defined by the presence of a single genetic abnormality: a chromosomal translocation.…

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Impulsivity, Not Inattention, Predicts Externalizing Disorders
Impulsivity, Not Inattention, Predicts Externalizing Disorders 1024 683 Natalie Wilson

Without early intervention, children with hyperactive-impulsive symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder may be vulnerable to developing other externalizing behavior disorders. Contributing to a small but growing body of litera­ture evaluating trait impulsivity theory, a team of researchers led by Mary A. Fristad, PhD, ABPP, director…

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Risk for Serious Complications From Vaccine-Preventable Infections After Hematopoietic Cell Transplant
Risk for Serious Complications From Vaccine-Preventable Infections After Hematopoietic Cell Transplant 1024 683 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

Clinician-scientists reveal the burden of vaccine-preventable infections among children post-transplant, when immunity is low and risk is high. When a hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipient at Nationwide Children’s Hospital was diagnosed with a vaccine-preventable infection (VPI), treating clinicians decided to evaluate the burden of…

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How Policy Can Influence Distracted Driving
How Policy Can Influence Distracted Driving 150 150 Laura Dattner

To combat the risks of using a cellphone while driving, states have implemented a variety of laws. As of July 2021, 21 of 50 states have implemented comprehensive hands-free cellphone laws (i.e., comprehensive handheld cellphone bans), which prohibit almost all handheld cellphone use including…

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Kidney and Urinary Tract Protein Demonstrates Antimicrobial Activity
Kidney and Urinary Tract Protein Demonstrates Antimicrobial Activity 1024 683 Lauren Dembeck

A little-studied peptide found in the urinary tract is a potential biomarker for urinary tract infection risk and could be developed into a novel therapeutic against drug-resistant bacteria.  Researchers at Nationwide Children’s Hospital have demonstrated that an understudied protein expressed in the human kidney…

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Nurse caring for infant in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU)
Is Tracheostomy Tube Placement in Preemies Safe?
Is Tracheostomy Tube Placement in Preemies Safe? 1024 575 Mary Bates, PhD

The procedure is safe and effective in newborns requiring high ventilator pressures. Tracheostomy tube placement is a common procedure performed for premature infants requiring respiratory assistance. Compared to an endotracheal tube, placement of a tracheostomy tube is thought to allow the infant more opportunities…

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Featured Researcher — Rodney Britt, PhD
Featured Researcher — Rodney Britt, PhD 150 150 Natalie Wilson

Rodney D. Britt Jr., PhD, is a principal investigator in the Center for Perinatal Research at the Abigail Wexner Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospital and an assistant professor of Pediatrics at The Ohio State University. Dr. Britt earned his bachelor’s degree in Chemistry…

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Black and white environmental portrait of Dr. Anup Patel standing in the hospital in his lab coat with his hand in his pocket
Long-Term Follow-up Study Shows Cannabidiol is Safe and Effective for Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome
Long-Term Follow-up Study Shows Cannabidiol is Safe and Effective for Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome 695 473 Mary Bates, PhD

Long-term treatment with highly purified plant-based CBD shows continued seizure reduction and no new side effects. The results of a long-term open-label extension trial of plant-derived, highly purified cannabidiol (CBD) show the treatment is effective and safe long term for patients with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome.…

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A Novel FUS/ETV4 Fusion and Other Rare FET/ETS Fusion Proteins Are Bona Fide Ewing Sarcoma
A Novel FUS/ETV4 Fusion and Other Rare FET/ETS Fusion Proteins Are Bona Fide Ewing Sarcoma 1024 575 Jessica Nye, PhD

Researchers conduct a molecular comparison between the established EWS/FLI translocation with rarer FET/ETS fusions, broadly supporting the inclusion of FET/ETS chimeric proteins in Ewing Sarcoma diagnosis and treatment.   Ewing sarcoma, most commonly caused by a chromosomal translocation of the amino-terminal domain of EWSR1…

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Targeted Muscle Reinnervation for Amputees Offers Chance at Less Pain, More Prosthetic Options
Targeted Muscle Reinnervation for Amputees Offers Chance at Less Pain, More Prosthetic Options 1024 684 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

The innovative procedure pioneered by surgeons at The Ohio State University and Nationwide Children’s Hospital reduces postoperative pain and enables control of bioprosthetics.   What started as Department of Defense-funded research in adult amputees at The Ohio State University Medical Center about 6 years…

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Ask A Specialist: Management of Labial Adhesions in Prepubertal Girls
Ask A Specialist: Management of Labial Adhesions in Prepubertal Girls 1024 680 Geri Hewitt, MD

What is the appropriate management of asymptomatic and symptomatic labial adhesions in a prepubertal girl? The management of labial adhesions has really evolved over time. The most important thing is to make sure you have the correct diagnosis and it’s not some other problem…

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What Pediatricians Should Know about Long COVID
What Pediatricians Should Know about Long COVID 1024 683 Octavio Ramilo, MD

More than 4 million children have tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 in the United States. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, long-term effects from COVID-19 can be significant, regardless of initial disease severity. Medical providers across the nation, including here at Nationwide Children’s Hospital,…

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Ask A Specialist: When Should Patients With Molluscum Contagiosum Be Referred to Dermatology?
Ask A Specialist: When Should Patients With Molluscum Contagiosum Be Referred to Dermatology? 1024 575 Patricia Witman, MD

What are the current treatment recommendations for moderate to severe molluscum, and when would you suggest referring to a dermatologist? Molluscum contagiosum is an infection caused by a virus that typically results in benign, mild skin disease characterized by lesions (Mollusca) that are small,…

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The Impact of Genomic Medicine: Carter’s Story
The Impact of Genomic Medicine: Carter’s Story 1024 685 Natalie Wilson

In 2013, at just 1 year old, Carter Daggett was diagnosed with a rare brain tumor. Now, in 2021, at 8 years old, he celebrated three years cancer free — thanks to his clinical teams and cutting-edge research by the team at the Steve…

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Identifying Early Urinary Biomarkers of Kidney Damage in Type 1 Diabetes
Identifying Early Urinary Biomarkers of Kidney Damage in Type 1 Diabetes 150 150 Mary Bates, PhD

Markers of renal tubule injury and oxidative stress indicate diabetic nephropathy before microalbuminuria. Diabetic nephropathy is a common complication of type 1 diabetes. Traditionally, measurement of microalbuminuria is used to screen children with diabetes for diabetic nephropathy. However, evidence suggests that damage to the…

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Alarming Upward Trend in Black Youth Suicide From 2003 to 2017
Alarming Upward Trend in Black Youth Suicide From 2003 to 2017 1024 683 Lauren Dembeck

Prioritization of research aimed at identifying specific risk and protective factors associated with Black youth suicidal behavior is needed. In the United States, the rates of suicide and suicidal behavior among youth, children and adolescents 5-17 years of age, have been steadily increasing over…

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B&W image of Dr. Gail Besner posing for a photo in her lab coat
Probiotic Treatment Promotes Neurodevelopment After Experimental Necrotizing Enterocolitis
Probiotic Treatment Promotes Neurodevelopment After Experimental Necrotizing Enterocolitis 777 640 Lauren Dembeck

A single dose of a novel live probiotic therapeutic protects the rodent brain during early development and the effects persist into adolescence. Researchers at Nationwide Children’s Hospital have demonstrated that when given in a biofilm state, probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri prevents the detrimental neurodevelopmental sequalae…

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