Monthly Archives :

September 2019

Exercise as Medicine: What Does This Really Mean?
Exercise as Medicine: What Does This Really Mean? 1024 575 Alyssa Schafer

A child’s lack of exercise can contribute to numerous health issues. “Currently, physical inactivity is ranked as the number four cause of death. 5.5% of deaths are due to physical inactivity which is totally preventable and treatable,” says James MacDonald, MD, MPH, a physician for Nationwide Children’s Sports Medicine. The question at large is how much do…

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Gene Expression Changes With CFTR Modulator Treatment
Gene Expression Changes With CFTR Modulator Treatment 150 150 Mary Bates, PhD

Patients with cystic fibrosis show transcriptomic changes after starting treatment with lumacaftor/ivacaftor. In a new study, researchers from Nationwide Children’s analyzed the gene expression profiles of cystic fibrosis patients before and after treatment with the drug lumacaftor/ivacaftor. The findings have implications for the evaluation of existing medications as well as the development of new treatments. Care…

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Skin-to-Skin Care Safe for Infants After Surgery
Skin-to-Skin Care Safe for Infants After Surgery 150 150 Mary Bates, PhD

A quality improvement project shows that skin-to-skin care can be safely integrated into the treatment of infants who require surgery. Multiple barriers prevent routine skin-to-skin care for infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), particularly for infants requiring surgical consultation. A recent quality improvement project, published in the Journal of Pediatric Surgery, shows that routine…

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The Search to Identify Tumor Cells Evading Chemotherapy
The Search to Identify Tumor Cells Evading Chemotherapy 150 150 Sanjana Rajan

Graduate research associate Sanjana Rajan shares why her work to label and track cells before and after chemotherapy is the next step to preventing tumor relapse. For a long time, the cells within a tumor were thought to be similar to one another, like a bowl of chocolate chips. However, scientific studies have identified that…

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Using Computer Models to Predict How Tissue Engineered Vascular Grafts Will Work
Using Computer Models to Predict How Tissue Engineered Vascular Grafts Will Work 150 150 Kevin Mayhood

Model and experimental data strongly suggest testing TEVGs until scaffold has biodegraded Identical tissue engineered vascular grafts (TEVGs) being tested in small-diameter veins and arteries of a mouse model performed well for 12 weeks. At 14 weeks, all TEVGs in the veins continued performing well, but all in the arteries suddenly failed. During their effort to understand…

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What Pediatric Subspecialists Need to Know About Hypophosphatasia and Its Treatment
What Pediatric Subspecialists Need to Know About Hypophosphatasia and Its Treatment 1024 575 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

Patients with hypophosphatasia may present to a wide range of specialists. Here’s the latest on diagnosis, patient management and clinical need for its only medical treatment: asfotase alfa enzyme replacement therapy (AA ERT). Hypophosphatasia is a rare, inherited condition that results in low serum alkaline phosphatase, which leads to poor construction of bones and teeth.…

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Pharmacists: The ‘Next Big Thing’ in Population Health Management
Pharmacists: The ‘Next Big Thing’ in Population Health Management 1020 304 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES
Nationwide Children's style illustration showing a row of houses with a prescription in front of it

One of the nation’s largest pediatric accountable care organizations has expanded pharmacists’ role in quality improvement efforts, which could substantially impact prescribing patterns and patient management. Partners For Kids (PFK), one of the country’s oldest and largest pediatric accountable care organizations, is a provider-based organization dedicated to population health management with three key aims: improved…

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A Hidden Epidemic: Parental Incarceration and What To Do When It Affects Your Patients
A Hidden Epidemic: Parental Incarceration and What To Do When It Affects Your Patients 1024 512 Andrew Axelson and Samantha Boch, PhD

If having an incarcerated parent was classified as a chronic health condition, it would be the second most prevalent chronic condition in the United States for children under the age of 18 – just behind asthma. In fact, the percentage of American youth with an incarcerated parent is about 10 times higher than the percentage…

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Research Collaborative Improves Outcome Prediction in Children With Posterior Urethral Valves
Research Collaborative Improves Outcome Prediction in Children With Posterior Urethral Valves 150 150 Lauren Dembeck

Combining data from five centers allowed researchers to address novel research questions for this rare disease. The Pediatric Urology Midwest Alliance (PUMA) recently published the results of its first collaborative study in Pediatrics. Using data from five institutions, the team demonstrated that the risk of renal replacement therapy and recommendation for clean intermittent catheterization increased with…

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Optimal Use of an FDA-Approved Device for PDA Closure in Infants
Optimal Use of an FDA-Approved Device for PDA Closure in Infants 150 150 Mary Bates, PhD

Randomized, controlled clinical trials are needed to answer questions regarding when and with whom to use the device. In January 2019, the US Food and Drug Administration approved a novel device for patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) closure in infants. The Amplatzer Piccolo Occluder is indicated for catheter-based closure of PDA in infants weighing more than…

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Variation in Functional Measurements of the Left Ventricle
Variation in Functional Measurements of the Left Ventricle 150 150 Mary Bates, PhD

Data from The Pediatric Heart Network Normal Echocardiogram Database show interobserver variability, especially in younger and smaller patients. Echocardiography is the primary tool clinicians have to assess ventricular size and function. Accurate evaluation of the left ventricle is critical in the treatment of patients with congenital and acquired heart disease, as well as other conditions…

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Nation’s First Clinical Trial for Pediatric Stroke Rehabilitation
Nation’s First Clinical Trial for Pediatric Stroke Rehabilitation 1024 575 Mary Bates, PhD
Toddler playing with toys

A novel movement-based therapy is being evaluated in infants who suffered a stroke as newborns or in the womb. Nationwide Children’s Hospital is participating in the nation’s first multicenter pediatric stroke recovery trial. The Phase III clinical trial, called I-ACQUIRE, will evaluate an innovative therapy to increase motor skills in 8-month-old to 24-month-old infants who…

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Stopping Progression of Tissue Injury after Button Battery Ingestion
Stopping Progression of Tissue Injury after Button Battery Ingestion 150 150 Abbie Roth

Irrigation with acetic acid neutralizes tissue and prevents delayed esophageal complications. Button battery injuries in children have been increasingly severe – resulting in devastating injuries and even death. Button batteries damage esophageal tissue through isothermic hydrolysis reactions, resulting in alkaline caustic injury, which leads to tissue necrosis. Prompt removal of the battery is critical to…

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