Monthly Archives :

November 2022

Robotic Approach to Rare Case Leads to Best Possible Outcome
Robotic Approach to Rare Case Leads to Best Possible Outcome 1024 683 Emily Siebenmorgen

A rare tumor in a child from Greece is resolved by robotic spleen-sparing distal pancreatectomy. Hospital visits can feel like a foreign experience for anyone, especially so when your hospital is actually in another country. But eight-year-old Evangelia felt especially at home after traveling to Nationwide Children’s Hospital from Greece for her care. Evangelia’s first…

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Biofilms In Respiratory Infections and Beyond: A Review
Biofilms In Respiratory Infections and Beyond: A Review 150 150 Emily Siebenmorgen

Researchers from Nationwide Children’s recently published a landmark piece in Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology reviewing everything known about biofilm aggregates and their role in respiratory tract infections to date. Biofilms create sticky situations for several diseases. These microbial communities are formed when bacterial cells stick to each other and attach themselves to a…

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Featured Researcher — Motao (Matt) Zhu, MS, MD, PhD
Featured Researcher — Motao (Matt) Zhu, MS, MD, PhD 150 150 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

Motao (Matt) Zhu, MS, MD, PhD, serves as a principal investigator in the Center for Injury Research and Policy at the Abigail Wexner Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. After starting off his epidemiology studies in reproductive health, Dr. Zhu transitioned into injury research and has since become an internationally recognized expert in young driver…

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The Impact and Implications of Interferons Against RSV
The Impact and Implications of Interferons Against RSV 1024 575 Emily Siebenmorgen
Illustration of lungs on blue silhouette of upper chest on black background

Specific cytokines play a key role in minimizing disease severity Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) shares many symptoms with other respiratory viruses like the common cold or the flu, but it represents the number one cause of hospitalization in infants worldwide. Despite being a large burden on the health care system, there are currently few preventative…

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How Quality Improvement Can Expand Insulin Pump Use and More
How Quality Improvement Can Expand Insulin Pump Use and More 150 150 Mary Bates, PhD

A Q&A with Don Buckingham about the T1D Exchange Quality Improvement Collaborative Don Buckingham, MBOE, CPHQ, CSSBB, joined Nationwide Children’s Center for Clinical Excellence as a quality strategist eight years ago. In a Q&A, he shares how he leveraged his background in industry and business services improvement in projects for the T1D Exchange Quality Improvement…

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Using Hormone Therapy First Drives Earlier Remission From Infantile Epileptic Spasms Syndrome
Using Hormone Therapy First Drives Earlier Remission From Infantile Epileptic Spasms Syndrome 1024 575 Natalie Wilson

Recent research conducted at Nationwide Children’s Hospital demonstrated standardizing hormone therapy as the first treatment for infantile spasms improved rates of early remission. Infantile epileptic spasms syndrome (IESS) is an uncommon epilepsy syndrome characterized by seizures called infantile spasms that begin between 1 and 24 months of age (with a peak age of onset at…

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New Nomogram Helps Optimize 3-D Rotational Angiography for Congenital Cardiac Catheterization
New Nomogram Helps Optimize 3-D Rotational Angiography for Congenital Cardiac Catheterization 1024 775 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

Clinician-researchers studied a large number of 3-D rotational angiography (3DRA) cases to identify patient and practice factors that produce the highest quality images. In an effort to aid in the successful application of 3-D rotational angiography (3DRA) in cardiac catheterization labs worldwide, a team of clinicians at Nationwide Children’s Hospital retrospectively reviewed 208 3DRAs to…

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Bowel Management Program Improves Urinary Symptoms Associated with Pediatric Functional Constipation
Bowel Management Program Improves Urinary Symptoms Associated with Pediatric Functional Constipation 150 150 JoAnna Pendergrass, DVM

A one-week bowel management program can significantly improve urinary symptoms in children with functional constipation, possibly eliminating the need for extensive urologic testing. Molly Fuchs, MD, a urologist at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, and her research team recently demonstrated that a bowel management program (BMP) significantly improved urinary symptoms in children with functional constipation. Functional constipation…

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Development of Acute Kidney Injury as a Potential Biomarker of Necrotizing Enterocolitis in Preterm Infants
Development of Acute Kidney Injury as a Potential Biomarker of Necrotizing Enterocolitis in Preterm Infants 1024 683 Mary Bates, PhD

Regular measurement of serum creatinine levels could help identify necrotizing enterocolitis sooner. Researchers at Nationwide Children’s neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) evaluated serum creatinine levels and the development of acute kidney injury as a potential biomarker of necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm infants. The retrospective chart review showed that acute kidney injury is more prevalent in…

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Study Suggests Survivors of Pediatric Brain Tumors Have Altered Connectivity of Key Brain Regions
Study Suggests Survivors of Pediatric Brain Tumors Have Altered Connectivity of Key Brain Regions 1024 575 Lauren Dembeck

The findings contribute to a scant body of literature on the changes in functional connection within the brain and neurocognitive outcomes in survivors of pediatric brain tumors. Pediatric brain tumors are the most common solid tumor diagnosis among children in the United States. With advances in treatment, the 5-year survival rate among these children and…

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Clearing Up Confusion On Cleft Lip and Palate
Clearing Up Confusion On Cleft Lip and Palate 150 150 Emily Siebenmorgen

There’s a common misconception that cleft lip and cleft palate is a third-world disease. The truth is: it’s very common in the United States. In fact, it’s the most common birth defect after congenital heart disease, occurring in one in 700 births. That’s around 5,000 births per year. On a recent episode, PediaCast host Mike…

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