Monthly Archives :

September 2015

Helping the Child by Helping the Mom
Helping the Child by Helping the Mom 150 150 Dave Ghose

Pediatricians can help babies by doing a better job screening new mothers for postpartum depression. Up to 20 percent of new mothers experience postpartum depression, but studies show that nearly half go undiagnosed. If pediatricians were to play a greater role in identifying mothers experiencing symptoms, they could play an important role in helping these…

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Planning, Teamwork and Technology Essential to Conjoined Twins’ Separation
Planning, Teamwork and Technology Essential to Conjoined Twins’ Separation 150 150 Abbie Roth

In a meticulously planned 16-hour operation, a 30-person team from four specialties successfully separated 11-month-old twins conjoined at the buttocks and lower spine. Specialists from General Pediatric Surgery, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Neurosurgery and Colorectal Surgery worked together to plan and execute a successful separation of conjoined twin girls, Acen and Apio, earlier this month. “In surgery,…

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Stress Dose Hydrocortisone Effects on Neurodevelopment for Extremely Low Birthweight Infants
Stress Dose Hydrocortisone Effects on Neurodevelopment for Extremely Low Birthweight Infants 150 150 Abbie Roth

First placebo-controlled study on stress dose hydrocortisone and neurodevelopment shows that higher doses of hydrocortisone are not associated with brain injury or neurodevelopmental impairments, but may not be effective in reducing risk for bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Hydrocortisone is one of the 15 most frequently prescribed medications in extremely low birth weight (≤1000 g) infants in the…

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Treating Sickle Cell Disease in the United States
Treating Sickle Cell Disease in the United States 1024 575 Abbie Roth

While people with sickle cell disease have better outcomes in the United States and other Western countries, progress in treating the disease has been slow moving. Sickle cell disease is marked by painful sickle cell crises, in which sickle-shaped cells get distorted in the small vessels and cause problems including disrupting blood flow and a…

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Challenges of Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer
Challenges of Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer 150 150 Anthony Audino, MD

Among the unique challenges of AYA cancer, anxiety often increases after treatments are completed as the patient reintegrates back into “normal life.” The definition of the adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer patient has evolved over time, but it is now formally defined as those diagnosed with cancer at ages 15 through 39. AYA patients are a…

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Understanding Genetic Predisposition to Cancer
Understanding Genetic Predisposition to Cancer 1024 683 Susan Colasce, MD and Elizabeth Varga

When should families who have children with cancer be concerned about inherited cancer predisposition? One of the most common questions parents ask when their child is diagnosed with cancer is, “Does this put my other children at higher risk for developing cancer as well?” Most of the time, the answer to this question is “no.”…

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