Myopericarditis After COVID-19 Vaccination
Myopericarditis After COVID-19 Vaccination 1024 683 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

A meta-analysis of international studies offers more detailed insight into the severity and outcomes of vaccine-related myopericarditis in the adolescent and young adult population. Concerns over myopericarditis and other cardiovascular complications in teens and young adults have gained considerable media attention. While myopericarditis-related data…

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Young child with Cerebral Palsy
New Guidelines for Care of Children With Cerebral Palsy
New Guidelines for Care of Children With Cerebral Palsy 1024 683 Abbie Miller

Guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Academy for Cerebral Palsy and Developmental Medicine highlight advances in diagnosis, care and outcomes for children and adolescents with cerebral palsy. In late 2022, the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Academy for…

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Virtual Support for Educating Parents of Newborns with Sickle Cell Trait
Virtual Support for Educating Parents of Newborns with Sickle Cell Trait 1024 681 Mary Bates, PhD

A supplementary videoconferencing program engages parents and reduces worry about sickle cell trait status. Nearly 3 million people in the U.S. have sickle cell trait (SCT), in which they inherit one sickle cell gene and one normal gene. Individuals with SCT are usually asymptomatic;…

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Fertility-Related Care for Girls With Turner Syndrome
Fertility-Related Care for Girls With Turner Syndrome 150 150 Mary Bates, PhD

Recent survey of providers shows fertility counseling and referrals are delivered inconsistently in this population. Researchers from Nationwide Children’s recently assessed practices surrounding fertility-related care among clinical providers who treat girls with Turner syndrome. They found that fertility counseling and referral rates remain inconsistent…

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New Insights into the Role of the NOTCH1 Gene in Congenital Heart Defects
New Insights into the Role of the NOTCH1 Gene in Congenital Heart Defects 150 150 Mary Bates, PhD

Experiments in human cells identify how mutations in the NOTCH1 gene impact cardiac cell differentiation and proliferation. A new study published in Circulation Research provides novel insights into how mutations in the NOTCH1 gene may lead to abnormal differentiation and proliferation of cardiomyocytes and…

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Featured Researcher — Jonathan Slaughter, MD, MPH
Featured Researcher — Jonathan Slaughter, MD, MPH 150 150 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

Jonathan Slaughter, MD, MPH, neonatologist and principal investigator in the Center for Perinatal Research at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, works to identify best practices and reduce treatment variation to improve neonatal clinical care and outcomes. His career took off when, after casually observing practice variation…

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Genomic Medicine Translational Protocols – What Do They Mean for Patients Everywhere?
Genomic Medicine Translational Protocols – What Do They Mean for Patients Everywhere? 1024 614 Elizabeth Varga

As part of the Journey to Best Outcomes, Nationwide Children’s Hospital has dedicated significant resources to genomic medicine, named as a key accelerator in the 2017-2021 strategic plan and as one of the three pillars that will be utilized to integrate research and clinical…

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Study Identifies Multiple Cell Signaling Pathways for Calcification in Aortic Valve Disease Regulated by Nitric Oxide
Study Identifies Multiple Cell Signaling Pathways for Calcification in Aortic Valve Disease Regulated by Nitric Oxide 1024 753 Lauren Dembeck

Exploring novel signaling mediators in calcific aortic valve disease may pave the way for the development of pharmacotherapies to treat this intractable condition during early stages of its progression.   Calcific aortic valve disease is a chronic inflammatory condition characterized by progressive fibrosis and…

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Preventing Pregnancies for Patients on Teratogenic Medications
Preventing Pregnancies for Patients on Teratogenic Medications 1024 575 Emily Siebenmorgen

In a recent study from Nationwide Children’s Hospital, researchers increased the time between pregnancies for patients on teratogenic medications from an average of 52 days to over 900 days through quality improvement (QI) and behavioral economics. Teratogenic medications such as methotrexate and mycophenolate are…

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Exploring the Complex Immune Microenvironment of Rasmussen Encephalitis
Exploring the Complex Immune Microenvironment of Rasmussen Encephalitis 1024 587 Lauren Dembeck

Researchers used a multi-omics approach to gain a deeper understanding of aberrant cellular signaling leading to progression of a rare childhood neurological disease.   Rasmussen encephalitis is a very rare childhood neurological disease characterized by chronic progressive inflammation of one hemisphere of the brain,…

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Low-Resource Screening Tool Demonstrates Superior Predictive Value for Cerebral Palsy in Infants
Low-Resource Screening Tool Demonstrates Superior Predictive Value for Cerebral Palsy in Infants 1024 683 JoAnna Pendergrass, DVM

The use of lower-resource screening tools for cerebral palsy in infants can help increase early detection of the condition and promote access to early interventions.   A recent study reported that the Hammersmith Infant Neurological Examination (HINE), when compared with the Test of Infant…

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Molly Fuchs, MD
Real-World Urinary Management and Outcomes in Cloacal Exstrophy Among Children and Adults
Real-World Urinary Management and Outcomes in Cloacal Exstrophy Among Children and Adults 1024 683 Jessica Nye, PhD

Most (94%) older children and adults with cloacal exstrophy are managed by incontinent diversion or clean intermittent catheterization. “The published literature about cloacal exstrophy can be misleading, and there is an impression that with surgical bladder reconstruction, normal bladder function and voiding can be…

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Supplementation With Omega 3-6 Improves a Marker of Inflammation Among Children Newly Diagnosed With Autism Spectrum Disorder
Supplementation With Omega 3-6 Improves a Marker of Inflammation Among Children Newly Diagnosed With Autism Spectrum Disorder 1024 681 Jessica Nye, PhD

Fatty acid supplementation may be a treatment route for addressing some underlying causes of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) among children.   One potential mechanism affecting autism-related behaviors is inflammation. In general, ASD severity has been associated with inflammatory cytokine levels and externalizing behaviors with…

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CFTR Modulation Therapy Improves Markers of Inflammation and Lung Function in Cystic Fibrosis
CFTR Modulation Therapy Improves Markers of Inflammation and Lung Function in Cystic Fibrosis 1024 575 Jessica Nye, PhD

Six months of elexacaftor-tezacaftor-ivacaftor (ETI) therapy significantly reduced proinflammatory cytokines, increased immune cell composition, and improved clinical outcomes in cystic fibrosis (CF).   “Cystic fibrosis is a progressive lung disease that carries significant morbidity,” says Shahid Sheikh, MD, of the Pulmonary Medicine and Allergy/Immunology…

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Predicting Risk of Nosocomial Infection in Pediatric Burn Patients: Can Measures of Adaptive Immune Function Help?
Predicting Risk of Nosocomial Infection in Pediatric Burn Patients: Can Measures of Adaptive Immune Function Help? 150 150 Abbie Miller

Pediatric burn injuries affect 1 million children each year in the United States. While burn care improvements have decreased mortality, infection-related complications remain a significant problem. According to the National Burn Repository, four of the top five complications of pediatric burns are infection related.…

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Intrauterine Devices are a First-Line Option for Adolescents with Bleeding Disorders
Intrauterine Devices are a First-Line Option for Adolescents with Bleeding Disorders 150 150 Mary Bates, PhD

Among adolescents with heavy menstrual bleeding, study shows no difference in IUD expulsion rate between adolescents with bleeding disorders and those without. In a new study, researchers from Nationwide Children’s evaluated the use of intrauterine devices (IUDs) in two young women’s hematology clinics. They…

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New Guidelines Offer a Clear Path for Expandable Endoprosthesis Use in Post-Sarcoma Limb Reconstruction
New Guidelines Offer a Clear Path for Expandable Endoprosthesis Use in Post-Sarcoma Limb Reconstruction 150 150 Abbie Miller

Limb salvage operation is the standard of care for pediatric extremity bone sarcomas. These tumors often occur during the second decade of life, when children are growing rapidly. Reconstructive surgeries must account for anticipated remaining growth and the potential for resulting limb inequity. Osteosarcoma…

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Robotic Approach to Rare Case Leads to Best Possible Outcome
Robotic Approach to Rare Case Leads to Best Possible Outcome 1024 683 Emily Siebenmorgen

A rare tumor in a child from Greece is resolved by robotic spleen-sparing distal pancreatectomy. Hospital visits can feel like a foreign experience for anyone, especially so when your hospital is actually in another country. But eight-year-old Evangelia felt especially at home after traveling…

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Biofilms In Respiratory Infections and Beyond: A Review
Biofilms In Respiratory Infections and Beyond: A Review 150 150 Emily Siebenmorgen

Researchers from Nationwide Children’s recently published a landmark piece in Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology reviewing everything known about biofilm aggregates and their role in respiratory tract infections to date. Biofilms create sticky situations for several diseases. These microbial communities are formed when…

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Featured Researcher — Motao (Matt) Zhu, MS, MD, PhD
Featured Researcher — Motao (Matt) Zhu, MS, MD, PhD 150 150 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

Motao (Matt) Zhu, MS, MD, PhD, serves as a principal investigator in the Center for Injury Research and Policy at the Abigail Wexner Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. After starting off his epidemiology studies in reproductive health, Dr. Zhu transitioned into injury research…

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The Impact and Implications of Interferons Against RSV
The Impact and Implications of Interferons Against RSV 1024 575 Emily Siebenmorgen

Specific cytokines play a key role in minimizing disease severity Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) shares many symptoms with other respiratory viruses like the common cold or the flu, but it represents the number one cause of hospitalization in infants worldwide. Despite being a large…

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How Quality Improvement Can Expand Insulin Pump Use and More
How Quality Improvement Can Expand Insulin Pump Use and More 150 150 Mary Bates, PhD

A Q&A with Don Buckingham about the T1D Exchange Quality Improvement Collaborative Don Buckingham, MBOE, CPHQ, CSSBB, joined Nationwide Children’s Center for Clinical Excellence as a quality strategist eight years ago. In a Q&A, he shares how he leveraged his background in industry and…

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Using Hormone Therapy First Drives Earlier Remission From Infantile Epileptic Spasms Syndrome
Using Hormone Therapy First Drives Earlier Remission From Infantile Epileptic Spasms Syndrome 1024 575 Natalie Wilson

Recent research conducted at Nationwide Children’s Hospital demonstrated standardizing hormone therapy as the first treatment for infantile spasms improved rates of early remission. Infantile epileptic spasms syndrome (IESS) is an uncommon epilepsy syndrome characterized by seizures called infantile spasms that begin between 1 and…

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New Nomogram Helps Optimize 3-D Rotational Angiography for Congenital Cardiac Catheterization
New Nomogram Helps Optimize 3-D Rotational Angiography for Congenital Cardiac Catheterization 1024 775 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

Clinician-researchers studied a large number of 3-D rotational angiography (3DRA) cases to identify patient and practice factors that produce the highest quality images. In an effort to aid in the successful application of 3-D rotational angiography (3DRA) in cardiac catheterization labs worldwide, a team…

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Bowel Management Program Improves Urinary Symptoms Associated with Pediatric Functional Constipation
Bowel Management Program Improves Urinary Symptoms Associated with Pediatric Functional Constipation 150 150 JoAnna Pendergrass, DVM

A one-week bowel management program can significantly improve urinary symptoms in children with functional constipation, possibly eliminating the need for extensive urologic testing. Molly Fuchs, MD, a urologist at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, and her research team recently demonstrated that a bowel management program (BMP)…

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Development of Acute Kidney Injury as a Potential Biomarker of Necrotizing Enterocolitis in Preterm Infants
Development of Acute Kidney Injury as a Potential Biomarker of Necrotizing Enterocolitis in Preterm Infants 1024 683 Mary Bates, PhD

Regular measurement of serum creatinine levels could help identify necrotizing enterocolitis sooner. Researchers at Nationwide Children’s neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) evaluated serum creatinine levels and the development of acute kidney injury as a potential biomarker of necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm infants. The retrospective…

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Study Suggests Survivors of Pediatric Brain Tumors Have Altered Connectivity of Key Brain Regions
Study Suggests Survivors of Pediatric Brain Tumors Have Altered Connectivity of Key Brain Regions 1024 575 Lauren Dembeck

The findings contribute to a scant body of literature on the changes in functional connection within the brain and neurocognitive outcomes in survivors of pediatric brain tumors. Pediatric brain tumors are the most common solid tumor diagnosis among children in the United States. With…

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Clearing Up Confusion On Cleft Lip and Palate
Clearing Up Confusion On Cleft Lip and Palate 600 400 Emily Siebenmorgen

There’s a common misconception that cleft lip and cleft palate is a third-world disease. The truth is: it’s very common in the United States. In fact, it’s the most common birth defect after congenital heart disease, occurring in one in 700 births. That’s around…

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Understanding Eosinophilic Esophagitis
Understanding Eosinophilic Esophagitis 150 150 Emily Siebenmorgen

Recent PediaCast CME episode from Mike Patrick, MD, shares important information about diagnosing and treating eosinophilic esophagitis. Eosinophilic esophagitis, or EOE, may not be the first condition providers think of when a patient presents with upper abdominal pain or dysphagia. EOE incidence has increased…

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How Can We Ensure Use of Artificial Intelligence in Pediatric Medicine Is Ethical?
How Can We Ensure Use of Artificial Intelligence in Pediatric Medicine Is Ethical? 915 341 Jessica Nye, PhD

Team diversity, data contextual factors, and transparency are key factors for the ethical use of artificial intelligence (AI) in pediatric medicine. AI has been increasingly used in medicine to help clinicians predict patient risk and make treatment decisions. A discussion about the ethical translation…

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Reducing Surgery and Its Associated Risks Through Advanced Interventional Endoscopy
Reducing Surgery and Its Associated Risks Through Advanced Interventional Endoscopy 150 150 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

Specially trained pediatric endoscopists can perform a range of diagnostic, interventional and therapeutic procedures for children, allowing them to avoid referral to adult endoscopists or even open surgery.   Muhammad Khan, MD, MPH, FASGE, the new director of interventional and diagnostic endoscopy at Nationwide…

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Featured Researcher — Brenda Lilly, PhD
Featured Researcher — Brenda Lilly, PhD 150 150 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

Brenda Lilly, PhD, a principal investigator in the Center for Cardiovascular Research at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, examines the interactions between endothelial cells, which line the inside of blood vessels, and smooth muscle cells. Blood vessels play a critical role in a wide variety of…

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Celebrating More Than 100 Heart Transplants — And a Host of Other Heart Program Achievements
Celebrating More Than 100 Heart Transplants — And a Host of Other Heart Program Achievements 1024 746 Deipanjan Nandi, MD, MSc

Deipanjan Nandi, MD, MSc, shares an update about treating heart failure at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. From transplant to ventricular assist devices and pharmaceutical options, the patient-centered care offers innovative options for patients with heart failure.

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Do Warning Labels on High-Powered Magnets Prevent Child Injury?
Do Warning Labels on High-Powered Magnets Prevent Child Injury? 1024 521 Laura Dattner

A recent study suggests parents often don’t notice or read warning labels on high powered magnets. They also perceive these products as children’s toys, despite FDA rules against marketing them to children under age 14 years. High-powered magnet products are made of rare-earth metals,…

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The Heart Center Team Employs New Device to Remove High-Risk Blood Clot
The Heart Center Team Employs New Device to Remove High-Risk Blood Clot 1024 670 Emily Siebenmorgen

This first-in-pediatrics procedure was performed by Arash Salavitabar, MD, interventional cardiologist at Nationwide Children’s Hospital.  When a pediatric patient sought care for an accidental gunshot wound to the abdomen, a central line infection during his course at a large regional hospital led to a…

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The New Book on Youth Suicide Prevention
The New Book on Youth Suicide Prevention 150 150 John Ackerman, PhD and Lisa Horowitz, PhD, MPH

Our new open access Springer Series book helps close the gap between the latest research in youth suicide prevention and how to make an impact in our communities.  Youth suicide is a public health crisis. It is the second leading cause of death among…

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Examining Pediatric Injury-Related Emergency Department Vistis During the COVID-19 Pandemic
Examining Pediatric Injury-Related Emergency Department Vistis During the COVID-19 Pandemic 480 320 JoAnna Pendergrass, DVM

During the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic, the frequency of pediatric injury-related visits to the emergency department decreased, while injury severity increased. The COVID-19 pandemic caused disruptions not only on a global scale but also for individuals, particularly children. Pandemic-related closures of school…

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Significant Weight Gain Observed in Low-Income Youth During the Early COVID-19 Pandemic
Significant Weight Gain Observed in Low-Income Youth During the Early COVID-19 Pandemic 150 150 JoAnna Pendergrass, DVM

Low-income youth experienced significant weight gain during the first six months of the COVID-19 pandemic, highlighting the need for simultaneous childhood obesity prevention and treatment.   The COVID-19 pandemic and subsequent mitigation efforts profoundly affected children. Specifically, remote learning and cancellation of extracurricular activities…

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InSight: Total Pancreatectomy With Islet Autotranplantation: The Basics
InSight: Total Pancreatectomy With Islet Autotranplantation: The Basics 1024 500 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

Download a PDF version of this image.       This feature was published in the Fall/Winter 2022 print issue. Download the full issue.  Image credit: Mandy Root-Thompson for Nationwide Children’s

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American Academy of Pediatrics Updates Guidelines for the Management of Neonatal Hyperbilirubinemia
American Academy of Pediatrics Updates Guidelines for the Management of Neonatal Hyperbilirubinemia 1024 737 Emily Siebenmorgen

Nationwide Children’s physicians collaborate on updates to testing, treatment and follow-up recommendations for preventing hazardous hyperbilirubinemia and possible brain damage. The American Academy of Pediatrics’ (AAP) recommendations for managing hyperbilirubinemia in infants 35 gestational weeks and older are among its most accessed sets of…

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New Initiative Aims to Bring Personalized Diagnosis and Treatment to Children With Solid Tumors
New Initiative Aims to Bring Personalized Diagnosis and Treatment to Children With Solid Tumors 1024 614 Lauren Dembeck

Collaboration among National Cancer Institute, Children’s Oncology Group and Nationwide Children’s Hospital will offer molecular characterization of childhood cancers. The National Institutes of Health’s National Cancer Institute (NCI), Children’s Oncology Group (COG), and Nationwide Children’s Hospital are poised to change the direction of pediatric…

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What’s the Relevance of Emotional Intelligence in Medicine?
What’s the Relevance of Emotional Intelligence in Medicine? 1024 386 Mike Patrick, MD and Erica Banta, MBA, LDSS

The practice of clinical medicine requires an intelligent mindset. Strong cognitive intelligence (IQ) is required to develop and maintain a substantial knowledge base and to call upon the critical thinking skills needed to synthesize a hundred points of data into a meaningful clinical picture,…

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TPIAT: A Way Forward for Chronic Pancreatitis
TPIAT: A Way Forward for Chronic Pancreatitis 1024 500 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

Nationwide Children’s Hospital has assembled a veritable “dream team” of pancreatitis and pediatric transplant surgery experts to offer what they hope will become the world’s preeminent pediatric center for complex pancreatic care. Imagine your child suffering from a sudden, debilitating episode of abdominal pain.…

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How One Family In Appalachia Changed the Medical Field’s Understanding of Pancreatitis
How One Family In Appalachia Changed the Medical Field’s Understanding of Pancreatitis 150 150 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

More than 30 years ago, a teenager from Kentucky named Kevin Slone had his first attack of acute pancreatitis. Doctors at the Cleveland Clinic urged his father, Bobby Slone, to try to document whether other people in the family had similar stomach problems. Bobby…

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Integrating Behavioral Health and Primary Care Increases Access and Equity
Integrating Behavioral Health and Primary Care Increases Access and Equity 1024 683 Mary Bates, PhD

With mental health concerns on the rise, more primary care providers are integrating behavioral health services in their practices.  Despite increasing demand for behavioral health care, multiple barriers still exist that limit access for pediatric patients. In recent years, primary care settings across the…

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Understanding Pediatric Critical COVID-19 Disease Around the World
Understanding Pediatric Critical COVID-19 Disease Around the World 150 150 Natalie Wilson

A large, multinational study found more children hospitalized with critical COVID-19 died than was indicated by previous studies.   Children under 18 represent around 22% of the population in the United States. Yet, just 15% of over 75 million U.S. COVID-19 cases reported to the…

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Multimodal Molecular Profiles Offer Clinically Valuable Information to Oncologists
Multimodal Molecular Profiles Offer Clinically Valuable Information to Oncologists 150 150 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

Expanding the profiling ordered for central nervous system (CNS) tumors may meaningfully impact diagnosis and treatment. Prajwal Rajappa, MD, MS, a physician-scientist and principal investigator for the Steve and Cindy Rasmussen Institute for Genomic Medicine (IGM) at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, has long advocated for…

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Ewing Sarcoma Transcription Factor Mediates Changes in Transcription by Reprogramming Chromatin Structure
Ewing Sarcoma Transcription Factor Mediates Changes in Transcription by Reprogramming Chromatin Structure 1024 575 Abbie Miller

By binding to DNA in the nucleus, the Ewing sarcoma-specific transcription factor EWS/FLI changes chromatin organization, leading to altered gene expression and the development of Ewing sarcoma.   A new report, published in Nucleic Acids Research, focuses on how the Ewing sarcoma-specific transcription factor…

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Breast Surgery in Adolescents: When Should You Consider It?
Breast Surgery in Adolescents: When Should You Consider It? 150 150 Ibrahim Khansa, MD

Research shows that addressing macromastia, breast asymmetry and gynecomastia in adolescence can improve physical symptoms as well as quality of life and mental wellbeing. Breast disorders such as macromastia, breast asymmetry and gynecomastia are in adolescents.2 Those conditions can negatively impair quality-of-life, and their…

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Brain Organoids Provide Novel Mechanistic Insight into Microcephaly Associated with AUTS2 Syndrome
Brain Organoids Provide Novel Mechanistic Insight into Microcephaly Associated with AUTS2 Syndrome 873 552 Lauren Dembeck

Researchers have functionally validated a genotype-phenotype relationship between a variant in the AUTS2 gene and neurodevelopmental deficits in AUTS2 syndrome using patient-derived brain organoids. Genetic variants in more than 100 genes, including the gene AUTS2, have been associated with autism spectrum disorders. However, the…

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Featured Researcher — Sarah O’Brien, MD
Featured Researcher — Sarah O’Brien, MD 150 150 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

The lab of Sarah O’Brien, MD, principal investigator in the Center for Child Health Equity and Outcomes Research at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, operates at the intersection of hematology and women’s health. Dr. O’Brien, who also leads the Young Women’s Hematology Clinic at Nationwide Children’s,…

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Predicting Response to Bronchodilators in Infants with Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia
Predicting Response to Bronchodilators in Infants with Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia 1024 683 Mary Bates, PhD

Study emphasizes importance of identifying those patients who will respond to treatment. Certain pulmonary function test parameters in newborns with bronchopulmonary dysplasia are associated with bronchodilator response, according to a new study from researchers at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. The team also found that responders…

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Study Shows 1 in 4 Girls Born With Anorectal Malformations Have Co-occurring Gynecologic Anomalies
Study Shows 1 in 4 Girls Born With Anorectal Malformations Have Co-occurring Gynecologic Anomalies 1024 575 Jessica Nye, PhD

Gynecological anomalies are common among girls with anorectal malformations (ARM) with or without associated vertebral, anorectal, cardiovascular, trachea-esophageal, renal and limb (VACTERL) anomalies. One in 5,000 live births have ARM and 20%-70% co-occur with other congenital anomalies, including VACTERL. For girls born with ARM,…

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Discovering the Genetic Causes of Congenital Heart Defects
Discovering the Genetic Causes of Congenital Heart Defects 1024 575 Lauren Dembeck

By studying the genomes of children and members of their family, researchers have discovered novel disease genes in families impacted by cardiac defects. Congenital heart disease is a leading cause of death in children under one year of age, and evidence supports a strong…

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Quality of Life in Pediatric Patients With Non-ambulatory Cerebral Palsy and Epilepsy
Quality of Life in Pediatric Patients With Non-ambulatory Cerebral Palsy and Epilepsy 600 400 Mary Bates, PhD

Study indicates that quality of life in young people with non-ambulatory cerebral palsy decreases with the use of more antiseizure medications. In a new study, researchers from Nationwide Children’s Hospital assessed the relationship between epilepsy-specific characteristics and proxy-reported health-related quality of life in children…

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Is There a Role for D-Mannose, Cranberry or Probiotics in Preventing Pediatric UTIs?
Is There a Role for D-Mannose, Cranberry or Probiotics in Preventing Pediatric UTIs? 1024 683 Deborah L. Ungerleider, MD, FAAP

Alternatives for prophylaxis of UTIs in children may help reduce antibiotic overuse. Preventing urinary tract infections (UTIs) in children is important, as multiple UTIs can lead to scarring of the kidneys, which can then lead to hypertension or end-stage renal disease.1 UTIs in children…

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Factors Modulating Parenting Stress in Families of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder
Factors Modulating Parenting Stress in Families of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder 1024 575 Mary Bates, PhD

Parenting self-efficacy and family resources impact the relationship between behavior problems in children with autism spectrum disorder and parenting stress. Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often exhibit co-occurring conditions that may increase parenting stress. These include externalizing behaviors, such as tantrums and disruptive…

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The Latest Developments in Limb Lengthening and Reconstruction Research
The Latest Developments in Limb Lengthening and Reconstruction Research 1024 683 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

Orthopedic experts publish an invited review of the past year’s most significant papers in the field of limb deformity correction and lengthening. To aid clinicians and surgeons who don’t have time for an annual deep-dive into the literature of their subspecialty, The Journal of…

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Anal Sphincter Botox Injections for Children With Severe Constipation
Anal Sphincter Botox Injections for Children With Severe Constipation 1024 680 Mary Bates, PhD

The treatment is safe and effective for many children with Hirschsprung disease and, to a lesser extent, functional constipation. In a new prospective study, researchers at Nationwide Children’s evaluated children with severe, refractory constipation treated with anal sphincter botulinum toxin (Botox) injection. They found…

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Long-Term Pulmonary Symptoms Following COVID-19 Infection in Children
Long-Term Pulmonary Symptoms Following COVID-19 Infection in Children 1024 683 Mary Bates, PhD

Fatigue and shortness of breath may persist, even in the absence of abnormal test results. Researchers at Nationwide Children’s recently published the largest U.S. study to date of pediatric patients with long-term pulmonary sequelae following COVID-19 infection. The authors note the persistence of symptoms…

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Profiling the Tumor Microenvironment Offers New Insight for Hard-to-Treat Tumors
Profiling the Tumor Microenvironment Offers New Insight for Hard-to-Treat Tumors 1024 269 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

A multi-faceted approach to precision medicine may allow clinicians to gain a better understanding of cancer and the complex ecosystem in which it resides. The field of precision medicine has evolved in leaps and bounds in the past two decades. Genomic profiling tools that…

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New Disorder of Copper Metabolism Identified, Caused by Variants in CTR1 Gene
New Disorder of Copper Metabolism Identified, Caused by Variants in CTR1 Gene 1024 575 Abbie Miller

A novel missense mutation in identical twins leads to discovery and definition of new inherited disorder of brain copper metabolism. Copper is essential for many cellular functions, including cellular respiration, antioxidant defense, neurotransmitter biosynthesis and neuropeptide amidation, among others. Until recently, only two inborn…

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Featured Researcher — Allison Bradbury, MS, PhD
Featured Researcher — Allison Bradbury, MS, PhD 150 150 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

Allison Bradbury, MS, PhD, is an accomplished principal investigator in the Center for Gene Therapy at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, but her introduction to medical research and the field of rare neurologic diseases wasn’t at school — it was in her great uncle’s garage, when his…

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How are Depression, Diabetes Distress and Glycemic Control Related in Adolescents With Type 2 Diabetes?
How are Depression, Diabetes Distress and Glycemic Control Related in Adolescents With Type 2 Diabetes? 150 150 Mary Bates, PhD

For adolescents with T2D, obesity and attempts at weight loss may contribute more to depression and diabetes distress than the demands of diabetes management. Diabetes distress is a negative emotional response to living with diabetes, a life-threatening illness that requires chronic, demanding, self-management. It…

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Nurse caring for infant in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU)
Nephrotoxic Medications in the NICU
Nephrotoxic Medications in the NICU 1024 575 Mary Bates, PhD

New study shows treatment with nephrotoxic medications in newborns is associated with the development of acute kidney injury, yet remains common. A multicenter analysis of nearly 50 pediatric hospitals showed that newborns are commonly treated with nephrotoxic medications and, troublingly, the prevalence of acute…

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Fertility Navigators Support Important Consultations in Pediatric Settings
Fertility Navigators Support Important Consultations in Pediatric Settings 150 150 Mary Bates, PhD

At Nationwide Children’s, hiring a full-time fertility navigator increased access to fertility care among pediatric patients. With advances in chemotherapy and radiation, more children are surviving cancer and entering adulthood. However, a potential consequence of such treatments is fertility impairment, which can affect about…

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Do Symptom Scores and pH Impedance Correlate in Infants Treated for Gastroesophageal Reflux?
Do Symptom Scores and pH Impedance Correlate in Infants Treated for Gastroesophageal Reflux? 1024 683 Lauren Dembeck

Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) — the passage of gastric contents into the esophagus — is a physiologic process that can be considered normal or abnormal depending on whether troublesome symptoms and/or complications also occur. In infants, it is difficult for clinicians to distinguish between GER…

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Salivary MicroRNAs: A Promising Biomarker for Persistent Post-concussive Symptoms in Children With Concussion
Salivary MicroRNAs: A Promising Biomarker for Persistent Post-concussive Symptoms in Children With Concussion 1024 768 Lauren Dembeck

The multidisciplinary study used children’s saliva and genomic analysis to identify promising biomarkers for persistent post-concussive symptoms. Predicting clinical recovery of children with concussion is challenging. While concussion symptoms typically resolve within one to three weeks, up to one-third of children develop persistent post-concussive…

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Telehealth Has the Potential to Bridge Gaps in Psychiatric and Behavioral Health Care
Telehealth Has the Potential to Bridge Gaps in Psychiatric and Behavioral Health Care 1024 535 Jessica Nye, PhD

A growing body of evidence supports telebehavioral health delivery for children, adolescents and their families, as outcomes are comparable to in-person treatment delivery. Despite evidence of efficacy, regulatory and financial concerns and technology barriers continue to impede widespread uptake of telebehavioral health. “There have…

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What’s the Scope of Nephritis in Pediatric Patients With IgA Vasculitis?
What’s the Scope of Nephritis in Pediatric Patients With IgA Vasculitis? 150 150 Jessica Nye, PhD

A multicenter study from the Pediatric Nephrology Research Consortium found that many pediatric patients with IgA vasculitis nephritis (IgAVN) are treated with immunosuppressive (IS) agents, and some had evidence of chronic kidney disease as early as 12 months after presentation.   IgA vasculitis (IgAV)…

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A Single-Dose Cancer Immunotherapy via Gene Transfer
A Single-Dose Cancer Immunotherapy via Gene Transfer 150 150 Mary Bates, PhD

Researchers at Nationwide Children’s Hospital report proof-of-principle results for a new gene therapy cancer treatment. The off-the-shelf, single-dose immunotherapy serves as an alternative to CAR-T therapy and can be engineered to be on-demand. T cells redirected to cancer cells either via a chimeric antigen…

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Tissue engineered vascular graft
Researchers Characterize Growth and Remodeling of Tissue-Engineered Blood Vessels
Researchers Characterize Growth and Remodeling of Tissue-Engineered Blood Vessels 600 400 Lauren Dembeck

Tissue engineering may soon give babies with congenital heart disease new blood vessels capable of native function and growth.   Major cardiovascular reconstructive operations in babies with congenital heart defects require the use of artificial blood vessels called vascular grafts. Because these grafts are…

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Quality Improvement Scorecard Enhances Safety for Newborns
Quality Improvement Scorecard Enhances Safety for Newborns 1024 683 Emily Siebenmorgen

The collaborative program between academic and community hospitals improves neonatal care quality. In a recent study published in The Journal of Pediatrics, researchers from Nationwide Children’s Hospital and affiliated level one and two community hospital nurseries implemented a quality improvement (QI) scorecard and found…

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Predicting Disease Severity and Assessing Long-Term Outcomes of Pediatric La Crosse Virus
Predicting Disease Severity and Assessing Long-Term Outcomes of Pediatric La Crosse Virus 1024 683 JoAnna Pendergrass, DVM

Limited data exist on mosquito-borne La Crosse Virus in children, underscoring the importance of determining which patients are at risk for severe disease and long-term neurobehavioral difficulties.   La Crosse Virus (LACV) is a neuroinvasive arbovirus spread by the Aedes triseriatus mosquito, causing symptoms…

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Featured Researcher — Mitchel Stacy, PhD
Featured Researcher — Mitchel Stacy, PhD 150 150 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

Mitchel Stacy, PhD, a principal investigator in the Center for Regenerative Medicine at Nationwide Children’s Hospital and assistant professor of Surgery at The Ohio State University, started his education with dietetics in mind. Finding his way instead to nuclear and molecular imaging of cardiovascular…

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Investigators Develop Technique to Effectively Edit NK Cells to Target Specific Cancer Cells
Investigators Develop Technique to Effectively Edit NK Cells to Target Specific Cancer Cells 1024 649 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

The third of three major challenges in enabling the clinical potential of NK cells for cancer therapy has just been addressed, thanks to the combined talents of gene editing experts and NK cell specialists at Nationwide Children’s Hospital.   Originally, NK cells seemed promising…

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Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation Post-COVID: Could Your Patient Benefit?
Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation Post-COVID: Could Your Patient Benefit? 1024 728 Abbie Miller

The road to recovery from COVID-19, the disease caused by SARS-CoV-2, is not always smooth, short or straight. For adults and children, long COVID, a condition where symptoms such as fatigue, headache and decreased respiratory function persist after the virus has “cleared” the body,…

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How Do Children With IBD and Their Caregivers Perceive Biosimilars?
How Do Children With IBD and Their Caregivers Perceive Biosimilars? 640 427 JoAnna Pendergrass, DVM

Many pediatric patients with inflammatory bowel disease and their caregivers are unaware of biosimilars, creating an opportunity for providers to educate patients and their families about this effective and less expensive treatment option. Infliximab is a biologic therapy that effectively manages inflammatory bowel disease…

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BRUE: What Is It? How Is It Treated?
BRUE: What Is It? How Is It Treated? 1024 575 Abbie Miller

BRUE –brief resolved unexplained event – whether you pronounce it brew-EE or brOO, it might be a term you haven’t run across since medical school. In a recent resident-led episode of PediaCast CME, Meghan Fennell, MD, and Vanessa Thiel, MD, break down everything you…

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Featured Researcher — Ashley Jackson, PhD
Featured Researcher — Ashley Jackson, PhD 150 150 Natalie Wilson

Ashley Jackson, PhD, is a principal investigator in The Kidney and Urinary Tract Center at Nationwide Children’s studying renal urothelium, the special surface tissue that lines most of the urinary tract, or the drainage system of the kidneys, to slow kidney disease progression in…

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Functional Neurological Disorders: What Pediatric Neurologists Should Know
Functional Neurological Disorders: What Pediatric Neurologists Should Know 150 150 Mary Bates, PhD

The diagnosis is common, yet this group of disorders has been subjected to confusion and stigma throughout history. Functional neurological disorders are a collection of disorders in which patients experience neurological symptoms, such as numbness, weakness, seizure-like events, or abnormal gait or movements, but…

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Self-Harm Risk Among Youth With First-Episode Psychosis
Self-Harm Risk Among Youth With First-Episode Psychosis 1024 575 Mary Bates, PhD

Study narrows down period of acute risk and finds shared and unique risk factors among adolescents and young adults. Although it is known that young people with psychosis are at an elevated risk for suicide and suicide-related behavior, it has not been clear which…

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Variability in Cardiac Diagnostics and Therapies for Patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy
Variability in Cardiac Diagnostics and Therapies for Patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy 1024 670 Mary Bates, PhD

Survey shows different approaches to cardiac diagnostics and therapy among a multicenter collaborative network. Cardiac disease is a major cause of mortality in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), yet data regarding outcomes and cardiac disease progression are lacking. This has led to a highly variable…

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The True History of the Nuremberg Code: Leo Alexander’s Blueprint Uncovered
The True History of the Nuremberg Code: Leo Alexander’s Blueprint Uncovered 150 150 Abbie Miller

An investigation of Duke University’s Medical Center’s Archives boxes labeled “Alexander’s Papers” reveals a document containing six principles, which were included nearly word-for-word in the Nuremberg Code.  At the end of the famous Doctors’ Trial, the trial of Nazi doctors for their crimes and…

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Featured Researcher — Juhi Bagaitkar, PhD
Featured Researcher — Juhi Bagaitkar, PhD 150 150 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

Juhi Bagaitkar, PhD, a principal investigator in the Center for Microbial Pathogenesis at the Abigail Wexner Research Institute (AWRI) at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, studies how immune cells and barrier epithelial cells (the cells that cover all internal and external surfaces in the body) protect…

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Novel Compound Shows Promise for Treating Nephrotic Syndrome
Novel Compound Shows Promise for Treating Nephrotic Syndrome 1024 575 Mary Bates, PhD

PPARγ selective modulator appear to be more efficacious in reducing proteinuria and comorbidities, and has fewer side effects than a traditional PPARγ agonist in a preclinical model of nephrotic syndrome. Nephrotic syndrome, characterized by high proteinuria, is one of the most common forms of…

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Hydroxyurea Dose and Adherence Affect Hematologic Outcomes in Children With Sickle Cell Disease
Hydroxyurea Dose and Adherence Affect Hematologic Outcomes in Children With Sickle Cell Disease 1024 683 JoAnna Pendergrass, DVM

Optimal hydroxyurea dosing and medication adherence can improve hematologic outcomes for children with sickle cell anemia.   For pediatric patients with sickle cell anemia, hydroxyurea is highly effective at reducing disease complications. However, it can be challenging for these patients to take hydroxyurea for…

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sleeping infant
Nafcillin is a Safe Alternative to Vancomycin for Empirical Treatment of Late-Onset Sepsis Among Infants in the NICU
Nafcillin is a Safe Alternative to Vancomycin for Empirical Treatment of Late-Onset Sepsis Among Infants in the NICU 1024 681 Mary Bates, PhD

Guidelines to reduce vancomycin use at three Ohio NICUs did not impact mortality rate. In 2014, the Neonatal Antimicrobial Stewardship Program at Nationwide Children’s Hospital recommended nafcillin rather than vancomycin for empirical therapy of possible late-onset sepsis in infants without a history of methicillin-resistant…

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A More Efficient Method for Diagnosing Electrical Status Epilepticus in Sleep?
A More Efficient Method for Diagnosing Electrical Status Epilepticus in Sleep? 375 280 Mary Bates, PhD

Calculating the spike-wave index of the EEG of just the first 100 seconds of sleep is enough for diagnosis. Electrical status epilepticus in sleep (ESES) is an electrographic pattern in which epileptiform activity is dramatically activated by sleep. The ESES pattern is a key…

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When Functional Outcomes Are Achieved Post-Op, Do Patients and Families Care About Scarring?
When Functional Outcomes Are Achieved Post-Op, Do Patients and Families Care About Scarring? 1024 683 Abbie Miller

A recent editorial from Dr. Daniel DaJusta questions whether cosmetic concerns after surgery are primarily driven by surgeons, patients or parents. It is widely accepted that having a smaller, neater or less visible scar following surgery is a preferable cosmetic outcome to a large,…

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NASPGHAN: New Guidance for Surgical Procedure Selection in Pediatric Chronic Pancreatitis
NASPGHAN: New Guidance for Surgical Procedure Selection in Pediatric Chronic Pancreatitis 899 450 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

Informed, multispecialty decision-making is essential to give children with chronic pancreatitis the best chance for long-term pain relief and improved quality of life, according to new guidance issued by the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology & Nutrition.   Chronic pancreatitis has long…

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Strategies and Resources for Managing Anxiety in Pediatric Patients
Strategies and Resources for Managing Anxiety in Pediatric Patients 1024 575 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

Anxiety disorders are one of the most common mental health diagnoses affecting children, making regular assessment and robust care resources essential to both primary and specialty care practices. Data from 2016-2019 report indicates that nearly 1 in 10 children ages 3-17 have ever been…

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Close up color photo of little boy holding hands on his belly
Is 3D Anorectal Manometry Preferable to Traditional Anorectal Manometry in Children With Functional Constipation?
Is 3D Anorectal Manometry Preferable to Traditional Anorectal Manometry in Children With Functional Constipation? 1024 680 Mary Bates, PhD

Study finds 3D-ARM is less comfortable and does not provide additional information compared to traditional ARM.   In a recent pilot study, researchers from Nationwide Children’s compared outcomes and patient experience of a new three-dimensional (3D) anorectal manometry (ARM) technique compared to regular ARM…

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Illustrations of clock faces at different times and angles
When Every Week Matters: Advancing a Treatment to the Clinic
When Every Week Matters: Advancing a Treatment to the Clinic 1024 491 Natalie Wilson

Researchers and regulatory experts bring a potential new therapy for a deadly neurodegenerative disease from IND application to clinical trial enrollment in a matter of weeks, setting a new standard in translating therapies from bench to bedside. In October 2021, the Office of Research…

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Optimizing the Body’s Natural Cancer Killers
Optimizing the Body’s Natural Cancer Killers 1024 649 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

Recent advances in the expansion and production of natural killer cells offers pediatric patients new hope for remission after high-risk cancer diagnoses. Natural killer (NK) cells are the innate immune system’s first line of defense for viral infections. Although these white blood cells don’t…

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How Does Allergic Disease Protect Against Developing Asthma After Viral Infection?
How Does Allergic Disease Protect Against Developing Asthma After Viral Infection? 1024 523 Mary Bates, PhD

Neutrophils and IL-4 are critical in preventing post-viral airway disease in mice with pre-existing allergic disease. In a new study, researchers from Nationwide Children’s Hospital show that in a mouse mode simulating human respiratory viral infection, pre-existing allergic disease prevents the development of asthma…

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