Monthly Archives :

January 2021

Lauren Bakaletz Named 2021 Allen Distinguished Scholar in Pediatric Research
Lauren Bakaletz Named 2021 Allen Distinguished Scholar in Pediatric Research 1024 575 Abbie Roth

Lauren Bakaletz, PhD, director of the Center for Microbial Pathogenesis in the Abigail Wexner Research Institute (AWRI) at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, was named the 2021 Allen Distinguished Scholar in Pediatric Research. The award is given in honor of former Nationwide Children’s CEO, Steve Allen, MD, and his role in growing the AWRI into a preeminent research institution.…

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Novel Genetic Driver Discovered for Pediatric Meningiomas Using Molecular Profiling
Novel Genetic Driver Discovered for Pediatric Meningiomas Using Molecular Profiling 1024 575 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

Researchers have uncovered a rare subset of meningiomas with a genetic driver shared by another cancer type, opening the door to new therapeutic considerations. When an interesting or intractable cancer case arises at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, researchers and clinicians involved in the Brain Tumor Protocol through The Steve and Cindy Rasmussen Institute for Genomic Medicine…

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Study Shows That When Housing Quality is Poor, Children Suffer
Study Shows That When Housing Quality is Poor, Children Suffer 1024 575 Jeb Phillips
two houses: one in poor repair, one in good repair

Holes in floors, cracks in walls, plumbing issues and/or problems with pests are linked with overall poorer pediatric health and higher health care use in a nationally representative study. Housing instability and homelessness are widely understood to have an impact on health, and certain housing problems have been linked to specific childhood health conditions, such…

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Pediatric Kidney Care: A Complex Issue for Low-Resource Nations
Pediatric Kidney Care: A Complex Issue for Low-Resource Nations 1024 575 Eric Butterman

Children are dying from kidney disease at alarming rates in low-resource nations. And some procedures that could reduce this high mortality would be considered simple and low-cost for many countries, says William Smoyer, MD, vice president and director of the Center for Clinical and Translational Research in the Abigail Wexner Research Institute (AWRI) at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. Dr.…

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Determining the Probability of a Sequential Slipped Hip
Determining the Probability of a Sequential Slipped Hip 1024 683 Mary Bates, PhD
Kevin Klingele, MD

A new predictive tool offers an objective method to help guide treatment in patients with unilateral slipped capital femoral epiphysis. In a recent study, researchers at Nationwide Children’s developed a scoring system based on radiological findings to predict sequential hip involvement in patients with unilateral slipped capital femoral epiphysis. They hope this predictive tool will help…

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Batten Disease Experts Publish Common Key Practices For Enzyme Replacement Therapy
Batten Disease Experts Publish Common Key Practices For Enzyme Replacement Therapy 1024 683 Lauren Dembeck

Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis type 2 disease is a rare, rapidly-progressing, neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disorder caused by tripeptidyl peptidase 1 deficiency. This form of Batten disease has an onset between two to four years of age. Children with CLN2 disease may experience intractable epilepsy, progressive cognitive and motor decline, and loss of vision. Historically, most children…

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CLABSI in Hematology and Oncology: Progress Toward Zero
CLABSI in Hematology and Oncology: Progress Toward Zero 1024 576 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES
Blood cells

A thorough review of five years of CLABSI data reveals key gaps in clinical knowledge that must be addressed to further reduce infection rates. For some time, any bloodstream infection (BSI) in a patient with a central venous catheter was considered a central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI). In 2013, refined definitions enabled a distinction between…

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Polysomnography in Infants: How Much Total Sleep Time is Really Needed?
Polysomnography in Infants: How Much Total Sleep Time is Really Needed? 1024 575 Abbie Roth
small baby with nose canula

Study identifies factors affecting total sleep time and suggests shorter sleep times can be effective for accurate interpretation and clinical decision making. In a recent study published in American Journal of Perinatology, experts from Nationwide Children’s Hospital investigated factors that affect total sleep time(TST) during infant polysomnography (PSG) in an effort to determine how much TST is…

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Novel Roles of the Urothelium in the Development of Congenital Anomalies of the Kidney and Urinary Tract
Novel Roles of the Urothelium in the Development of Congenital Anomalies of the Kidney and Urinary Tract 150 150 Lauren Dembeck

In addition to genetic defects, interactions of the developing urothelium with its underlying mesenchyme and superficial plaque may contribute to congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract. Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUTs) are the leading cause of chronic and end-stage kidney disease in children. Collaborative translational research at Nationwide Children’s…

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Risk Stratification in Infants With Primary Pulmonary Vein Stenosis
Risk Stratification in Infants With Primary Pulmonary Vein Stenosis 1024 681 Mary Bates, PhD
sleeping infant

Categorizing infants with pulmonary vein stenosis into stable and progressive groups could help inform treatment. Primary pulmonary vein stenosis is a rare, often lethal, cardiac disease. It is challenging to treat, as the disease can be progressive in some patients but not others. In a new study, researchers from Nationwide Children’s describe outcomes among preterm infants…

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Early Intervention is Key to Avoid Hospitalization for Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome
Early Intervention is Key to Avoid Hospitalization for Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome 1024 683 Mary Bates, PhD
Health care provider talking to male teen patient

Study finds that waiting to go to the emergency department for treatment increases likelihood of hospitalization. Cyclic vomiting syndrome is a functional gastrointestinal disorder characterized by periodic episodes of intense nausea and vomiting lasting hours to days. During episodes, some children become very sick and require emergency department care and hospitalization to manage symptoms and…

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Boosting Natural Killer Cells for the Treatment of COVID-19
Boosting Natural Killer Cells for the Treatment of COVID-19 150 150 Lauren Dembeck

Natural killer cells — critical for immune surveillance and host defense — have an important role in cancer immunotherapy and antiviral responses. While driving to the laboratory one day, Brian Tullius, MA, MD, a fourth-year bone marrow transplant and cell therapies fellow at Nationwide Children’s in the Lee Lab, had an epiphany. “I thought, ‘wait…

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What Kids and Kidneys Can Teach Pediatricians About Racism in America
What Kids and Kidneys Can Teach Pediatricians About Racism in America 1024 575 Ray Bignall

O.N. Ray Bignall II, MD, FAAP, director of Kidney Health Advocacy and Community Engagement, explores how “race modifiers,” structural racism and health disparities are perpetuated in kidney care for kids, highlighting important areas primed for change.

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