In Brief

Therapy With Double-Bright Natural Killer Cell Infusions Increases Response Rates Among Frail Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia
Therapy With Double-Bright Natural Killer Cell Infusions Increases Response Rates Among Frail Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia 969 533 Jessica Nye, PhD
Illustration of NK Cells, T Cells, other immune cells floating across white background

A case series of 13 patients with relapsed/refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML) finds that a novel approach using repeated infusions of cultured natural killer (NK) cells increases overall and complete response rates. NK cells are lymphocytes – white blood cell components of the innate immune response – that have anti-leukemic properties. Although efforts to incorporate…

read more
Repeated Injury to Stem Cells Could be a Significant Contributor to Chronic Lung Disease
Repeated Injury to Stem Cells Could be a Significant Contributor to Chronic Lung Disease 1024 575 Abbie Roth
Illustration of lungs on blue silhouette of upper chest on black background

A series of experiments shows that biological aging of tracheobronchial stem cells could drive the development of chronic lung disease. In a recent publication in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine (SCTM), researchers showed that repeated injury to epithelial cells in the airway caused biological aging of the stem cells located there. Tracheobronchial stem cells (TSCs) are…

read more
Treating Intrauterine Opioid Exposure in Infants Born Preterm
Treating Intrauterine Opioid Exposure in Infants Born Preterm 1024 575 Deborah L. Ungerleider, MD, FAAP

We need a protocol to evaluate and treat neonatal abstinence syndrome in preterm infants. Neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) occurs when infants who are exposed to opioids in utero develop withdrawal signs and symptoms after birth.1 According to past studies, NAS occurs in 55% to 94% of infants exposed to opioids, with an increasing incidence between…

read more
A Patient-Centered Medical Home for Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease
A Patient-Centered Medical Home for Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease 1024 683 Mary Bates, PhD

The Center for Pediatric and Adolescent IBD serves as a case study for comprehensive, multidisciplinary care. In a new paper published in Inflammatory Bowel Disease, researchers from Nationwide Children’s describe the multidisciplinary care model at the Center for Pediatric and Adolescent Inflammatory Bowel Disease as an example of a pediatric specialty medical home. The researchers…

read more
Standardizing Training in Pediatric Cardiac Critical Care
Standardizing Training in Pediatric Cardiac Critical Care 150 150 Mary Bates, PhD

In a new report, a taskforce of experts presented their recommendations to standardize training in pediatric cardiac critical care. The authors hope the report is a first step toward more oversight of training and certification in the field. The field of pediatric cardiac critical care is relatively young but growing quickly. Currently, there are 120…

read more
Validity of the WISC-V Intelligence Testing in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder
Validity of the WISC-V Intelligence Testing in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder 1024 575 Mary Bates, PhD

Evaluating thinking and reasoning abilities for children with autism using conventional intelligence tests can be done, but with some caution. The Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, Fifth Edition (WISC-V) is one of the most widely used intelligence tests for children. However, little is known about the validity of this test in children with autism spectrum…

read more
Codetection of Respiratory Bacteria in Infants With RSV Infection Associated With Worse Outcomes
Codetection of Respiratory Bacteria in Infants With RSV Infection Associated With Worse Outcomes 1024 575 Lauren Dembeck
Color photo of Black father holding infant on shoulder in front of nursery background with clouds on the wall

The interaction between the bacteria and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) appears to be synergistic. Researchers are now working to understand the underlying biological mechanisms. Researchers at Nationwide Children’s Hospital have discovered that codetection of Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae in the upper respiratory tract of previously healthy infants with RSV infection was independently associated with…

read more
Additional Ventures: Investing in Congenital Heart Disease Research to Advance Care
Additional Ventures: Investing in Congenital Heart Disease Research to Advance Care 150 150 Natalie Wilson

Additional Ventures is a purpose-driven nonprofit that has developed the Single Ventricle Research Fund (SVRF), an annual research award program dedicated to accelerating research and improving care for people with single ventricle heart defects. The fund supports investigators through multi-year, high-impact grants focused on different elements in their carefully structured research roadmap. By funding investigators…

read more
Lubiprostone Found to be Safe, as Effective as Placebo in Children With Constipation
Lubiprostone Found to be Safe, as Effective as Placebo in Children With Constipation 1024 680 Mary Bates, PhD
Close up color photo of little boy holding hands on his belly

The medication, FDA-approved for adults, may benefit older pediatric patients with less of a behavioral component to their constipation. Pediatric functional constipation, though common, remains challenging to treat. Lubiprostone is a medication approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of constipation and irritable bowel syndrome with constipation in adults. In…

read more
Distinct Transcriptional Regulatory Domain Identified in Ewing Sarcoma Fusion Protein
Distinct Transcriptional Regulatory Domain Identified in Ewing Sarcoma Fusion Protein 1024 1024 Lauren Dembeck
Illustration of split DNA - Single strand ribonucleic acid

A better understanding of a newly defined region in the fusion protein that causes Ewing sarcoma may lead to novel approaches for therapeutic targeting. Ewing sarcoma is an aggressive pediatric bone cancer defined by the presence of a single genetic abnormality: a chromosomal translocation. The translocation splits two genes and joins them abnormally, creating a…

read more
Impulsivity, Not Inattention, Predicts Externalizing Disorders
Impulsivity, Not Inattention, Predicts Externalizing Disorders 1024 683 Natalie Wilson
Black and white image of five smiling kids/adolescents

Without early intervention, children with hyperactive-impulsive symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder may be vulnerable to developing other externalizing behavior disorders. Contributing to a small but growing body of litera­ture evaluating trait impulsivity theory, a team of researchers led by Mary A. Fristad, PhD, ABPP, director of Academic Affairs and Research Development in the Division of Child…

read more
Risk for Serious Complications From Vaccine-Preventable Infections After Hematopoietic Cell Transplant
Risk for Serious Complications From Vaccine-Preventable Infections After Hematopoietic Cell Transplant 1024 683 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

Clinician-scientists reveal the burden of vaccine-preventable infections among children post-transplant, when immunity is low and risk is high. When a hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipient at Nationwide Children’s Hospital was diagnosed with a vaccine-preventable infection (VPI), treating clinicians decided to evaluate the burden of VPI in HCT patients at Nationwide Children’s and elsewhere. The team…

read more
How Policy Can Influence Distracted Driving
How Policy Can Influence Distracted Driving 150 150 Laura Dattner

To combat the risks of using a cellphone while driving, states have implemented a variety of laws. As of July 2021, 21 of 50 states have implemented comprehensive hands-free cellphone laws (i.e., comprehensive handheld cellphone bans), which prohibit almost all handheld cellphone use including texting, calling and using apps. In addition, three states and the…

read more
Kidney and Urinary Tract Protein Demonstrates Antimicrobial Activity
Kidney and Urinary Tract Protein Demonstrates Antimicrobial Activity 1024 683 Lauren Dembeck

A little-studied peptide found in the urinary tract is a potential biomarker for urinary tract infection risk and could be developed into a novel therapeutic against drug-resistant bacteria.  Researchers at Nationwide Children’s Hospital have demonstrated that an understudied protein expressed in the human kidney and bladder kills the bacteria that cause urinary tract infections (UTI).…

read more
Is Tracheostomy Tube Placement in Preemies Safe?
Is Tracheostomy Tube Placement in Preemies Safe? 1024 575 Mary Bates, PhD
Nurse caring for infant in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU)

The procedure is safe and effective in newborns requiring high ventilator pressures. Tracheostomy tube placement is a common procedure performed for premature infants requiring respiratory assistance. Compared to an endotracheal tube, placement of a tracheostomy tube is thought to allow the infant more opportunities for comfort, interaction, nutrition and growth. However, rates of tracheostomy tube…

read more
Long-Term Follow-up Study Shows Cannabidiol is Safe and Effective for Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome
Long-Term Follow-up Study Shows Cannabidiol is Safe and Effective for Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome 695 473 Mary Bates, PhD
Black and white environmental portrait of Dr. Anup Patel standing in the hospital in his lab coat with his hand in his pocket

Long-term treatment with highly purified plant-based CBD shows continued seizure reduction and no new side effects. The results of a long-term open-label extension trial of plant-derived, highly purified cannabidiol (CBD) show the treatment is effective and safe long term for patients with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. The treatment had a similar safety profile as in the original…

read more
A Novel FUS/ETV4 Fusion and Other Rare FET/ETS Fusion Proteins Are Bona Fide Ewing Sarcoma
A Novel FUS/ETV4 Fusion and Other Rare FET/ETS Fusion Proteins Are Bona Fide Ewing Sarcoma 1024 575 Jessica Nye, PhD

Researchers conduct a molecular comparison between the established EWS/FLI translocation with rarer FET/ETS fusions, broadly supporting the inclusion of FET/ETS chimeric proteins in Ewing Sarcoma diagnosis and treatment.   Ewing sarcoma, most commonly caused by a chromosomal translocation of the amino-terminal domain of EWSR1 with the transcription factor FLI (EWS/FLI), presents as an aggressive pediatric…

read more
Targeted Muscle Reinnervation for Amputees Offers Chance at Less Pain, More Prosthetic Options
Targeted Muscle Reinnervation for Amputees Offers Chance at Less Pain, More Prosthetic Options 1024 684 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

The innovative procedure pioneered by surgeons at The Ohio State University and Nationwide Children’s Hospital reduces postoperative pain and enables control of bioprosthetics.   What started as Department of Defense-funded research in adult amputees at The Ohio State University Medical Center about 6 years ago has morphed into standard of care treatment for children undergoing…

read more
Practical Tips for Clinicians to Support Transgender and Gender-Diverse Youth
Practical Tips for Clinicians to Support Transgender and Gender-Diverse Youth 1024 683 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

Experts share advice for family medicine and other practitioners hoping to learn more about supporting transgender and gender-diverse patients. Although gender identity-related health topics have made it into mainstream media in recent months, their lack of discussion in many clinician education programs has left some medical and mental health professionals unsure how to identify, interact…

read more
Ask A Specialist: Management of Labial Adhesions in Prepubertal Girls
Ask A Specialist: Management of Labial Adhesions in Prepubertal Girls 1024 680 Geri Hewitt, MD

What is the appropriate management of asymptomatic and symptomatic labial adhesions in a prepubertal girl? The management of labial adhesions has really evolved over time. The most important thing is to make sure you have the correct diagnosis and it’s not some other problem with the vagina opening. Labial adhesions are isolated (not associated with…

read more
Ask A Specialist: When Should Patients With Molluscum Contagiosum Be Referred to Dermatology?
Ask A Specialist: When Should Patients With Molluscum Contagiosum Be Referred to Dermatology? 1024 575 Patricia Witman, MD
Toddler playing with toys

What are the current treatment recommendations for moderate to severe molluscum, and when would you suggest referring to a dermatologist? Molluscum contagiosum is an infection caused by a virus that typically results in benign, mild skin disease characterized by lesions (Mollusca) that are small, raised and usually white, pink or flesh colored with a dimple…

read more
Identifying Early Urinary Biomarkers of Kidney Damage in Type 1 Diabetes
Identifying Early Urinary Biomarkers of Kidney Damage in Type 1 Diabetes 1024 575 Mary Bates, PhD

Markers of renal tubule injury and oxidative stress indicate diabetic nephropathy before microalbuminuria. Diabetic nephropathy is a common complication of type 1 diabetes. Traditionally, measurement of microalbuminuria is used to screen children with diabetes for diabetic nephropathy. However, evidence suggests that damage to the kidneys may begin soon after diagnosis, much earlier than microalbuminuria can…

read more
Probiotic Treatment Promotes Neurodevelopment After Experimental Necrotizing Enterocolitis
Probiotic Treatment Promotes Neurodevelopment After Experimental Necrotizing Enterocolitis 777 640 Lauren Dembeck
B&W image of Dr. Gail Besner posing for a photo in her lab coat

A single dose of a novel live probiotic therapeutic protects the rodent brain during early development and the effects persist into adolescence. Researchers at Nationwide Children’s Hospital have demonstrated that when given in a biofilm state, probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri prevents the detrimental neurodevelopmental sequalae of experimental necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC).1 The findings, published in Brain, Behavior…

read more
Specialized Treatment for Severe Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia Increases Survival
Specialized Treatment for Severe Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia Increases Survival 150 150 Mary Bates, PhD

Most infants with established BPD referred to Nationwide’s BPD Center improve and survive, despite the severity of their illness. In a new study, researchers analyzed the in-hospital outcomes for preterm infants with established bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) referred to Nationwide Children’s Comprehensive Center for BPD. They found that despite the high degree of illness severity in…

read more
Postoperative Care for Benign Ovarian Neoplasms
Postoperative Care for Benign Ovarian Neoplasms 150 150 Mary Bates, PhD

Study suggests no benefit from routine imaging and supports symptomatic imaging for postoperative management of benign ovarian neoplasms. In a new study, researchers at Nationwide Children’s Hospital led a collaboration with eight children’s hospitals examining the follow-up care and subsequent outcomes of pediatric patients after surgery for a benign ovarian neoplasm to develop evidence-based recommendations…

read more
Administering NK Cells Post-Transplant Improves Relapse in Myeloid Malignancies
Administering NK Cells Post-Transplant Improves Relapse in Myeloid Malignancies 150 150 Mary Bates, PhD

A Phase I/II clinical trial demonstrates donor-derived NK cells are safe and effective at decreasing relapse and increasing survival in adults with myeloid malignancies. Haploidentical stem-cell transplantation can be a successful treatment for patients with myeloid malignancies, but relapse remains a common risk. Natural killer (NK) cells are a subset of lymphocytes capable of recognizing…

read more
Stent Implantations Are an Option for Small Patients
Stent Implantations Are an Option for Small Patients 1024 670 Mary Bates, PhD

Stents that can be dilated to adult size are safe and effective for the treatment of coarctation of the aorta in young patients. Studies have demonstrated stent implantation is more effective and safer than balloon angioplasty for the treatment of coarctation of the aorta in adult and older pediatric patients. In smaller patients, however, particularly…

read more
Video Game-Based Therapy Makes Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation Program More Patient-Centric
Video Game-Based Therapy Makes Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation Program More Patient-Centric 1024 683 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES
Smiling boy outside

Patients can benefit from traditional therapeutic services as well as engaging, updated approaches to improve lung capacity and fitness.  The Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation Program at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, launched in 2005 after a year-long pilot, has long offered services for patients to improve their ability to engage in exercise, school and activities of daily living. As…

read more
Two Novel Biomarkers for Urinary Tract Infection Diagnosis Identified
Two Novel Biomarkers for Urinary Tract Infection Diagnosis Identified 1024 575 Mary Bates, PhD

Study identifies two proteins that are elevated in children with UTIs compared to those with culture-negative pyuria. In a new study from Nationwide Children’s, researchers identified two novel biomarkers that could be developed to further fine tune the diagnosis of urinary tract infection (UTI) in children. UTIs are common, but challenging to diagnose, in children.…

read more
When Dismantling Bacterial Biofilms, the First Line of Defense Comes From Within
When Dismantling Bacterial Biofilms, the First Line of Defense Comes From Within 1024 575 Natalie Wilson
Illustration showing the precise pattern of a biofilm - a perfect, 3D matrix

Researchers identified the mechanism behind the anti-biofilm properties of a protein found in all vertebrates. Too little of this protein allows disease-causing bacteria protected by biofilms to spread, while too much can lead to septic shock. Could a molecule of this protein be engineered to destroy biofilms without negative effects on the body? A team…

read more
Unraveling the Role of Pioneer Factors in Childhood Cancer
Unraveling the Role of Pioneer Factors in Childhood Cancer 150 150 Abbie Roth

New study implicates PAX3-FOXO1, an oncogenic driver of rhabdomyosarcoma, as a chimeric pioneer factor. Transcription factors are proteins that read the DNA sequences and can direct the transcription of that sequence into mRNA for translation into a protein. Transcription can become deregulated in cancer. Normally, transcription factors read sequences of DNA that are described as…

read more
Cylinder Mitral Valve Construct is a Safe and Durable Alternative for Young Patients
Cylinder Mitral Valve Construct is a Safe and Durable Alternative for Young Patients 1024 752 Mary Bates, PhD
Top-down view of heart valves

The new technique could potentially reduce the number of lifetime surgeries required by these patients, researchers say. In a new study, researchers from Nationwide Children’s Hospital report that pediatric patients who underwent cylinder mitral valve construct, a new technique for replacing the mitral valve, had improved left ventricular function over time. In addition, there were…

read more
Robotic Surgery Is Here to Stay
Robotic Surgery Is Here to Stay 150 150 Abbie Roth

A recent publication describes increases in the use of robotic surgery in children’s hospitals across the country.  The use of robotic surgery in tertiary children’s hospitals has been on the rise since the 2000s. In a recent publication, researchers from Nationwide Children’s Hospital sought to characterize the use and growth in acceptance of robotic surgeries…

read more
Molecular Toolset: Real-Time Screening for SARS-CoV-2 Variants
Molecular Toolset: Real-Time Screening for SARS-CoV-2 Variants 1024 683 Lauren Dembeck

Tracking variants of concern or interest is critical to inform public health decisions and to ensure patients receive the best available COVID-19 treatments for SARS-CoV-2 infections. Researchers at Nationwide Children’s Hospital and The Ohio State University (OSU) have developed a set of mutation-specific tests with same-day reporting that can detect five variants of concern (VOCs)…

read more
EVALI and MIS-C: Overlapping Diagnoses
EVALI and MIS-C: Overlapping Diagnoses 1024 575 Mary Bates, PhD

Taking a thorough history can differentiate these similarly presenting conditions. In a new report, researchers from Nationwide Children’s Hospital describe six patients admitted to the hospital with concerns for MIS-C who were later diagnosed with EVALI. The researchers discuss the factors that led them to differentiate between the two disorders and arrive at the correct…

read more
An Alarming Connection Between Justice System Involvement and Child Health
An Alarming Connection Between Justice System Involvement and Child Health 1024 575 Jeb Phillips

A first-of-its kind study finds that while only 2% of patients at a large children’s hospital are identified with likely personal or family involvement in the justice system, they account for large proportions of some troubling diagnoses. Research over the last decade has shown that young people who have been incarcerated can have poorer physical…

read more
5 Things to Know About Vertebral Body Tethering for Scoliosis
5 Things to Know About Vertebral Body Tethering for Scoliosis 150 150 Allan C. Beebe, MD and Crystal D. Seilhamer, FNP

As the surgical approach to scoliosis grows in popularity, understanding the pros, cons and contraindications becomes increasingly important. At the Center for Comprehensive Spine Care in the Department of Orthopedics at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, patients and providers are increasingly asking about vertebral body tethering for scoliosis. Traditionally, scoliosis is treated with a variety of modalities…

read more
Improving Suicide Prevention by Examining Characteristics and Precipitating Circumstances Among Children Aged 5 to 11 Years
Improving Suicide Prevention by Examining Characteristics and Precipitating Circumstances Among Children Aged 5 to 11 Years 150 150 Natalie Wilson

Suicides among children aged 11 or younger are on the rise. In response to this trend and a call to action by the National Institute of Mental Health task force on child suicide research, researchers have identified common themes across coroner’s and police reports on suicide deaths in this age group to identify warning signs…

read more
Diabetes Distress Associated With Poor Glycemic Control in Adolescents With Diabetes
Diabetes Distress Associated With Poor Glycemic Control in Adolescents With Diabetes 1024 683 Mary Bates, PhD

Screening for diabetes distress, in addition to depression, could benefit adolescents with diabetes. Adolescents with type 1 diabetes are more likely to experience depression than their peers without diabetes, and symptoms of depression can directly impact adherence to diabetes care. Thus, both the American Diabetes Association and International Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes recommend…

read more
Lawnmower Injuries in Children Are Limb-Threatening and Avoidable
Lawnmower Injuries in Children Are Limb-Threatening and Avoidable 1024 683 Ibrahim Khansa, MD

During the warm months, lawnmowers are a ubiquitous sight in American lawns. Unfortunately, more than 9,000 children are injured by lawnmowers every year in the United States. In a recent study, published in the Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery – Open, our group from the Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at Nationwide…

read more
Occurrence and Cost of Infections After Heart Transplant
Occurrence and Cost of Infections After Heart Transplant 150 150 Mary Bates, PhD

Researchers identify risk factors, long-term outcomes of vaccine-preventable infections following heart transplantation in pediatric patients. Recently, a study using the Pediatric Health Information System (PHIS) database found that one in six pediatric solid organ transplant recipients were hospitalized with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) or vaccine-preventable illness in the first five years after transplant. Within this…

read more
Providing Education and PrEP for Teens at Risk for HIV
Providing Education and PrEP for Teens at Risk for HIV 1024 683 Abbie Roth

In a recent PediaCast CME, Mike Patrick, MD, and Megan Brundrett, MD, share important information about offering PrEP and HIV-related education in your primary care practice. Listen to the Full Episode About 20% of new cases of HIV, the virus that causes Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS), are occurring in youth aged 13 to 24. HIV/AIDS…

read more
Unique Approach Helps Child Neurology Residents Improve Communication Skills
Unique Approach Helps Child Neurology Residents Improve Communication Skills 150 150 Natalie Wilson

More than 75% of residents said the opportunity to receive direct feedback from standardized patients, faculty and peers during simulated patient encounters was a valuable addition to their medical education. Teaching residents how to be sensitive, supportive, clear and thorough as they communicate complex information to patients and families is an essential part of medical…

read more
Does Twinkle Artifact on Ultrasound Indicate a Kidney Stone in Pediatric Patients?
Does Twinkle Artifact on Ultrasound Indicate a Kidney Stone in Pediatric Patients? 150 150 Abbie Roth

The presence of twinkle artifact on ultrasound is a useful, though imperfect, tool for diagnosing kidney stones in children. For pediatric patients, ultrasound is the recommended imaging modality used to diagnose kidney stones. Several findings are used to identify stones on ultrasound, including the presence of an echogenic focus, posterior acoustic shadowing, or twinkle artifact.…

read more
Understanding the Social Neural Network
Understanding the Social Neural Network 1024 575 Natalie Wilson
Young boy turned sideways in front of a dark background, with dark lighting and an illustration of his brain appearing in front of the side of his head

Neuroimaging of participants with and without epilepsy allows researchers to explore the neural networks associated with social skills. Epilepsy is a chronic brain disease characterized by neural network dysfunction and seizures. According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), 470,000 children in the United States had active epilepsy in 2015. These children are more likely…

read more
Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia: Characterizing the Chronic Lung Disease of Prematurity
Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia: Characterizing the Chronic Lung Disease of Prematurity 1024 575 Lauren Dembeck
Nurse caring for infant in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU)

  Precise definitions and/or classifications of bronchopulmonary dysplasia are needed to optimize outcomes. Researchers at Nationwide Children’s Hospital are continuing to help refine the definition of severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia (sBPD). In a recent study, members of the BPD Collaborative demonstrated that preterm infants with sBPD who were on invasive mechanical ventilation at 36 weeks, a…

read more
Diuretic Therapy in Preterm Infants With Acute Kidney Injury Is Common: Should It Be?
Diuretic Therapy in Preterm Infants With Acute Kidney Injury Is Common: Should It Be? 1024 575 Lauren Dembeck
small baby with nose canula

Lack of efficacy and safety data on diuretic therapy in the critically ill infants is cause for concern. Researchers at Nationwide Children’s Hospital are beginning to fill in the gaps. Despite the common use of diuretic therapy in preterm infants with acute kidney injury, to date, no large studies have evaluated the patterns of prescription…

read more
Chronic Pediatric Pancreatitis and (No) Persistent Belly Pain
Chronic Pediatric Pancreatitis and (No) Persistent Belly Pain 1024 575 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

Underlying — even silent — chronic pancreatitis can be at play in children without previous acute pancreatitis episodes, including among children with little or no reported pain. Pancreatitis in children is rare (about 3-13 per 100,000 people per year), but diagnosis is increasing, at least in part due to increased awareness among physicians. The path…

read more
Understanding Black Youth Suicide: Steps Toward Prevention
Understanding Black Youth Suicide: Steps Toward Prevention 1024 596 Abbie Roth

To understand the how and why of rising rates of Black youth suicide, researchers call for a ‘Ground Zero’ approach. In December 2019, the Congressional Black Caucus released the statement “Ring the Alarm: The Crisis of Black Youth Suicide in America.” The statement focused on rising suicide rates among Black youth in the United States.…

read more
“Left Behind Again:” Rural Children Enrolled in Medicaid Use Home Health Services Far Less Than Urban Children
“Left Behind Again:” Rural Children Enrolled in Medicaid Use Home Health Services Far Less Than Urban Children 1024 575 Jeb Phillips

Data from a pediatric accountable care organization is allowing physicians and researchers to explore the rural-urban health care gap. While it’s long been clear that children in rural areas have reduced access to some kinds of health care services compared to their urban peers, understanding the specifics of the care gap has proven difficult, because…

read more