In Brief

The Heart Center Team Employs New Device to Remove High-Risk Blood Clot
The Heart Center Team Employs New Device to Remove High-Risk Blood Clot 1024 670 Emily Siebenmorgen

This first-in-pediatrics procedure was performed by Arash Salavitabar, MD, interventional cardiologist at Nationwide Children’s Hospital.  When a pediatric patient sought care for an accidental gunshot wound to the abdomen, a central line infection during his course at a large regional hospital led to a much more serious blood clot in his right atrium. His case…

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The New Book on Youth Suicide Prevention
The New Book on Youth Suicide Prevention 150 150 John Ackerman, PhD and Lisa Horowitz, PhD, MPH

Our new open access Springer Series book helps close the gap between the latest research in youth suicide prevention and how to make an impact in our communities.  Youth suicide is a public health crisis. It is the second leading cause of death among youth aged 10-17 in the United States, according to data from…

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Examining Pediatric Injury-Related Emergency Department Vistis During the COVID-19 Pandemic
Examining Pediatric Injury-Related Emergency Department Vistis During the COVID-19 Pandemic 480 320 JoAnna Pendergrass, DVM

During the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic, the frequency of pediatric injury-related visits to the emergency department decreased, while injury severity increased. The COVID-19 pandemic caused disruptions not only on a global scale but also for individuals, particularly children. Pandemic-related closures of school and extracurricular activities significantly impacted the daily routines of children and…

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Significant Weight Gain Observed in Low-Income Youth During the Early COVID-19 Pandemic
Significant Weight Gain Observed in Low-Income Youth During the Early COVID-19 Pandemic 150 150 JoAnna Pendergrass, DVM

Low-income youth experienced significant weight gain during the first six months of the COVID-19 pandemic, highlighting the need for simultaneous childhood obesity prevention and treatment.   The COVID-19 pandemic and subsequent mitigation efforts profoundly affected children. Specifically, remote learning and cancellation of extracurricular activities disrupted children’s daily routines and reduced opportunities for physical activity, increasing…

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How One Family In Appalachia Changed the Medical Field’s Understanding of Pancreatitis
How One Family In Appalachia Changed the Medical Field’s Understanding of Pancreatitis 150 150 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

More than 30 years ago, a teenager from Kentucky named Kevin Slone had his first attack of acute pancreatitis. Doctors at the Cleveland Clinic urged his father, Bobby Slone, to try to document whether other people in the family had similar stomach problems. Bobby Slone took the homework to heart, documenting incidences of similar symptoms…

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Understanding Pediatric Critical COVID-19 Disease Around the World
Understanding Pediatric Critical COVID-19 Disease Around the World 150 150 Natalie Wilson

A large, multinational study found more children hospitalized with critical COVID-19 died than was indicated by previous studies.   Children under 18 represent around 22% of the population in the United States. Yet, just 15% of over 75 million U.S. COVID-19 cases reported to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and fewer than 0.2% of over…

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Ewing Sarcoma Transcription Factor Mediates Changes in Transcription by Reprogramming Chromatin Structure
Ewing Sarcoma Transcription Factor Mediates Changes in Transcription by Reprogramming Chromatin Structure 1024 575 Abbie Roth
yellow squiggly lines representing chromatin strands in the nucleus

By binding to DNA in the nucleus, the Ewing sarcoma-specific transcription factor EWS/FLI changes chromatin organization, leading to altered gene expression and the development of Ewing sarcoma.   A new report, published in Nucleic Acids Research, focuses on how the Ewing sarcoma-specific transcription factor EWS/FLI changes spatial organization of DNA in the nucleus of Ewing…

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Brain Organoids Provide Novel Mechanistic Insight into Microcephaly Associated with AUTS2 Syndrome
Brain Organoids Provide Novel Mechanistic Insight into Microcephaly Associated with AUTS2 Syndrome 873 552 Lauren Dembeck
Microscopy image of cerebral organoid sections

Researchers have functionally validated a genotype-phenotype relationship between a variant in the AUTS2 gene and neurodevelopmental deficits in AUTS2 syndrome using patient-derived brain organoids. Genetic variants in more than 100 genes, including the gene AUTS2, have been associated with autism spectrum disorders. However, the model systems used to study the mechanisms underlying how these genetic…

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Predicting Response to Bronchodilators in Infants with Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia
Predicting Response to Bronchodilators in Infants with Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia 1024 683 Mary Bates, PhD

Study emphasizes importance of identifying those patients who will respond to treatment. Certain pulmonary function test parameters in newborns with bronchopulmonary dysplasia are associated with bronchodilator response, according to a new study from researchers at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. The team also found that responders had evidence of greater dysanaptic lung growth than nonresponders. Bronchodilators are…

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Study Shows 1 in 4 Girls Born With Anorectal Malformations Have Co-occurring Gynecologic Anomalies
Study Shows 1 in 4 Girls Born With Anorectal Malformations Have Co-occurring Gynecologic Anomalies 1024 575 Jessica Nye, PhD

Gynecological anomalies are common among girls with anorectal malformations (ARM) with or without associated vertebral, anorectal, cardiovascular, trachea-esophageal, renal and limb (VACTERL) anomalies. One in 5,000 live births have ARM and 20%-70% co-occur with other congenital anomalies, including VACTERL. For girls born with ARM, gynecologic congenital anomalies can occur, especially with more complex ARM. To…

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Discovering the Genetic Causes of Congenital Heart Defects
Discovering the Genetic Causes of Congenital Heart Defects 1024 575 Lauren Dembeck

By studying the genomes of children and members of their family, researchers have discovered novel disease genes in families impacted by cardiac defects. Congenital heart disease is a leading cause of death in children under one year of age, and evidence supports a strong genetic component underlying this group of common developmental defects. However, historically,…

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Quality of Life in Pediatric Patients With Non-ambulatory Cerebral Palsy and Epilepsy
Quality of Life in Pediatric Patients With Non-ambulatory Cerebral Palsy and Epilepsy 600 400 Mary Bates, PhD

Study indicates that quality of life in young people with non-ambulatory cerebral palsy decreases with the use of more antiseizure medications. In a new study, researchers from Nationwide Children’s Hospital assessed the relationship between epilepsy-specific characteristics and proxy-reported health-related quality of life in children and young people with non-ambulatory cerebral palsy. The findings indicate that…

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The Latest Developments in Limb Lengthening and Reconstruction Research
The Latest Developments in Limb Lengthening and Reconstruction Research 1024 683 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES
Dr. Iobst with patient

Orthopedic experts publish an invited review of the past year’s most significant papers in the field of limb deformity correction and lengthening. To aid clinicians and surgeons who don’t have time for an annual deep-dive into the literature of their subspecialty, The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery publishes yearly reviews courtesy of invited guest…

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Anal Sphincter Botox Injections for Children With Severe Constipation
Anal Sphincter Botox Injections for Children With Severe Constipation 1024 680 Mary Bates, PhD
Close up color photo of little boy holding hands on his belly

The treatment is safe and effective for many children with Hirschsprung disease and, to a lesser extent, functional constipation. In a new prospective study, researchers at Nationwide Children’s evaluated children with severe, refractory constipation treated with anal sphincter botulinum toxin (Botox) injection. They found the treatment can be effective in patients with both Hirschsprung disease…

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Long-Term Pulmonary Symptoms Following COVID-19 Infection in Children
Long-Term Pulmonary Symptoms Following COVID-19 Infection in Children 1024 683 Mary Bates, PhD

Fatigue and shortness of breath may persist, even in the absence of abnormal test results. Researchers at Nationwide Children’s recently published the largest U.S. study to date of pediatric patients with long-term pulmonary sequelae following COVID-19 infection. The authors note the persistence of symptoms such as shortness of breath and fatigue and highlight at least…

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Profiling the Tumor Microenvironment Offers New Insight for Hard-to-Treat Tumors
Profiling the Tumor Microenvironment Offers New Insight for Hard-to-Treat Tumors 1024 269 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

A multi-faceted approach to precision medicine may allow clinicians to gain a better understanding of cancer and the complex ecosystem in which it resides. The field of precision medicine has evolved in leaps and bounds in the past two decades. Genomic profiling tools that were once cost-prohibitive and slow are now reasonably affordable and fast…

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New Disorder of Copper Metabolism Identified, Caused by Variants in CTR1 Gene
New Disorder of Copper Metabolism Identified, Caused by Variants in CTR1 Gene 1024 575 Abbie Roth

A novel missense mutation in identical twins leads to discovery and definition of new inherited disorder of brain copper metabolism. Copper is essential for many cellular functions, including cellular respiration, antioxidant defense, neurotransmitter biosynthesis and neuropeptide amidation, among others. Until recently, only two inborn errors of copper metabolism were well established. Both are rare. Wilson’s…

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How are Depression, Diabetes Distress and Glycemic Control Related in Adolescents With Type 2 Diabetes?
How are Depression, Diabetes Distress and Glycemic Control Related in Adolescents With Type 2 Diabetes? 150 150 Mary Bates, PhD

For adolescents with T2D, obesity and attempts at weight loss may contribute more to depression and diabetes distress than the demands of diabetes management. Diabetes distress is a negative emotional response to living with diabetes, a life-threatening illness that requires chronic, demanding, self-management. It is frequently mistaken for depression and the two are interrelated. Previous…

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Nephrotoxic Medications in the NICU
Nephrotoxic Medications in the NICU 1024 575 Mary Bates, PhD
Nurse caring for infant in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU)

New study shows treatment with nephrotoxic medications in newborns is associated with the development of acute kidney injury, yet remains common. A multicenter analysis of nearly 50 pediatric hospitals showed that newborns are commonly treated with nephrotoxic medications and, troublingly, the prevalence of acute kidney injury is higher in newborns treated with these drugs. The…

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Do Symptom Scores and pH Impedance Correlate in Infants Treated for Gastroesophageal Reflux?
Do Symptom Scores and pH Impedance Correlate in Infants Treated for Gastroesophageal Reflux? 1024 683 Lauren Dembeck

Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) — the passage of gastric contents into the esophagus — is a physiologic process that can be considered normal or abnormal depending on whether troublesome symptoms and/or complications also occur. In infants, it is difficult for clinicians to distinguish between GER and pathophysiologic GER disease (GERD). “Current diagnostic criteria for GERD are…

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Telehealth Has the Potential to Bridge Gaps in Psychiatric and Behavioral Health Care
Telehealth Has the Potential to Bridge Gaps in Psychiatric and Behavioral Health Care 1024 535 Jessica Nye, PhD
Collage of health technology tools

A growing body of evidence supports telebehavioral health delivery for children, adolescents and their families, as outcomes are comparable to in-person treatment delivery. Despite evidence of efficacy, regulatory and financial concerns and technology barriers continue to impede widespread uptake of telebehavioral health. “There have definitely been silver linings to the pandemic, and this is one…

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A Single-Dose Cancer Immunotherapy via Gene Transfer
A Single-Dose Cancer Immunotherapy via Gene Transfer 1024 575 Mary Bates, PhD

Researchers at Nationwide Children’s Hospital report proof-of-principle results for a new gene therapy cancer treatment. The off-the-shelf, single-dose immunotherapy serves as an alternative to CAR-T therapy and can be engineered to be on-demand. T cells redirected to cancer cells either via a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR-T) or a bispecific molecule have been game-changers in treating…

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Researchers Characterize Growth and Remodeling of Tissue-Engineered Blood Vessels
Researchers Characterize Growth and Remodeling of Tissue-Engineered Blood Vessels 600 400 Lauren Dembeck
Tissue engineered vascular graft

Tissue engineering may soon give babies with congenital heart disease new blood vessels capable of native function and growth.   Major cardiovascular reconstructive operations in babies with congenital heart defects require the use of artificial blood vessels called vascular grafts. Because these grafts are made of man-made materials, the recipients’ tissues eventually begin to outgrow…

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Quality Improvement Scorecard Enhances Safety for Newborns
Quality Improvement Scorecard Enhances Safety for Newborns 1024 683 Emily Siebenmorgen

The collaborative program between academic and community hospitals improves neonatal care quality. In a recent study published in The Journal of Pediatrics, researchers from Nationwide Children’s Hospital and affiliated level one and two community hospital nurseries implemented a quality improvement (QI) scorecard and found improvements in important perinatal outcomes. “Roughly half of all newborns in…

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Predicting Disease Severity and Assessing Long-Term Outcomes of Pediatric La Crosse Virus
Predicting Disease Severity and Assessing Long-Term Outcomes of Pediatric La Crosse Virus 1024 683 JoAnna Pendergrass, DVM

Limited data exist on mosquito-borne La Crosse Virus in children, underscoring the importance of determining which patients are at risk for severe disease and long-term neurobehavioral difficulties.   La Crosse Virus (LACV) is a neuroinvasive arbovirus spread by the Aedes triseriatus mosquito, causing symptoms such as vomiting, seizures and altered mental status (AMS). Within the…

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Investigators Develop Technique to Effectively Edit NK Cells to Target Specific Cancer Cells
Investigators Develop Technique to Effectively Edit NK Cells to Target Specific Cancer Cells 1024 649 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

The third of three major challenges in enabling the clinical potential of NK cells for cancer therapy has just been addressed, thanks to the combined talents of gene editing experts and NK cell specialists at Nationwide Children’s Hospital.   Originally, NK cells seemed promising for a natural therapy to fight cancer due to their innate…

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Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation Post-COVID: Could Your Patient Benefit?
Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation Post-COVID: Could Your Patient Benefit? 1024 728 Abbie Roth

The road to recovery from COVID-19, the disease caused by SARS-CoV-2, is not always smooth, short or straight. For adults and children, long COVID, a condition where symptoms such as fatigue, headache and decreased respiratory function persist after the virus has “cleared” the body, can add increased stress and hardship. Additionally, even mild cases of…

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How Do Children With IBD and Their Caregivers Perceive Biosimilars?
How Do Children With IBD and Their Caregivers Perceive Biosimilars? 640 427 JoAnna Pendergrass, DVM

Many pediatric patients with inflammatory bowel disease and their caregivers are unaware of biosimilars, creating an opportunity for providers to educate patients and their families about this effective and less expensive treatment option. Infliximab is a biologic therapy that effectively manages inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in adult and pediatric patients. However, biologic therapies are expensive,…

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BRUE: What Is It? How Is It Treated?
BRUE: What Is It? How Is It Treated? 1024 575 Abbie Roth

BRUE –brief resolved unexplained event – whether you pronounce it brew-EE or brOO, it might be a term you haven’t run across since medical school. In a recent resident-led episode of PediaCast CME, Meghan Fennell, MD, and Vanessa Thiel, MD, break down everything you need to know about BRUE. Listen to the PediaCast CME Episode…

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Self-Harm Risk Among Youth With First-Episode Psychosis
Self-Harm Risk Among Youth With First-Episode Psychosis 1024 575 Mary Bates, PhD

Study narrows down period of acute risk and finds shared and unique risk factors among adolescents and young adults. Although it is known that young people with psychosis are at an elevated risk for suicide and suicide-related behavior, it has not been clear which patients are at the most risk and when. In a new…

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Variability in Cardiac Diagnostics and Therapies for Patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy
Variability in Cardiac Diagnostics and Therapies for Patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy 1024 670 Mary Bates, PhD

Survey shows different approaches to cardiac diagnostics and therapy among a multicenter collaborative network. Cardiac disease is a major cause of mortality in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), yet data regarding outcomes and cardiac disease progression are lacking. This has led to a highly variable approach to heart failure therapy in DMD from center to center,…

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The True History of the Nuremberg Code: Leo Alexander’s Blueprint Uncovered
The True History of the Nuremberg Code: Leo Alexander’s Blueprint Uncovered 150 150 Abbie Roth

An investigation of Duke University’s Medical Center’s Archives boxes labeled “Alexander’s Papers” reveals a document containing six principles, which were included nearly word-for-word in the Nuremberg Code.  At the end of the famous Doctors’ Trial, the trial of Nazi doctors for their crimes and treatment of people who were identified as “research participants,” Judge Sebring…

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Novel Compound Shows Promise for Treating Nephrotic Syndrome
Novel Compound Shows Promise for Treating Nephrotic Syndrome 1024 575 Mary Bates, PhD

PPARγ selective modulator appear to be more efficacious in reducing proteinuria and comorbidities, and has fewer side effects than a traditional PPARγ agonist in a preclinical model of nephrotic syndrome. Nephrotic syndrome, characterized by high proteinuria, is one of the most common forms of glomerular disease. It is typically associated with edema, hypercholesterolemia, hypoalbuminemia, systemic…

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Hydroxyurea Dose and Adherence Affect Hematologic Outcomes in Children With Sickle Cell Disease
Hydroxyurea Dose and Adherence Affect Hematologic Outcomes in Children With Sickle Cell Disease 1024 683 JoAnna Pendergrass, DVM

Optimal hydroxyurea dosing and medication adherence can improve hematologic outcomes for children with sickle cell anemia.   For pediatric patients with sickle cell anemia, hydroxyurea is highly effective at reducing disease complications. However, it can be challenging for these patients to take hydroxyurea for the long term. “There are many barriers to medication adherence in…

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Nafcillin is a Safe Alternative to Vancomycin for Empirical Treatment of Late-Onset Sepsis Among Infants in the NICU
Nafcillin is a Safe Alternative to Vancomycin for Empirical Treatment of Late-Onset Sepsis Among Infants in the NICU 1024 681 Mary Bates, PhD
sleeping infant

Guidelines to reduce vancomycin use at three Ohio NICUs did not impact mortality rate. In 2014, the Neonatal Antimicrobial Stewardship Program at Nationwide Children’s Hospital recommended nafcillin rather than vancomycin for empirical therapy of possible late-onset sepsis in infants without a history of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection or colonization. In a new study, researchers…

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A More Efficient Method for Diagnosing Electrical Status Epilepticus in Sleep?
A More Efficient Method for Diagnosing Electrical Status Epilepticus in Sleep? 375 280 Mary Bates, PhD

Calculating the spike-wave index of the EEG of just the first 100 seconds of sleep is enough for diagnosis. Electrical status epilepticus in sleep (ESES) is an electrographic pattern in which epileptiform activity is dramatically activated by sleep. The ESES pattern is a key electrographic feature in several pediatric seizure disorders that vary in severity.…

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When Functional Outcomes Are Achieved Post-Op, Do Patients and Families Care About Scarring?
When Functional Outcomes Are Achieved Post-Op, Do Patients and Families Care About Scarring? 1024 683 Abbie Roth

A recent editorial from Dr. Daniel DaJusta questions whether cosmetic concerns after surgery are primarily driven by surgeons, patients or parents. It is widely accepted that having a smaller, neater or less visible scar following surgery is a preferable cosmetic outcome to a large, ragged or highly visible scar. This is supported anecdotally by surgeons,…

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Strategies and Resources for Managing Anxiety in Pediatric Patients
Strategies and Resources for Managing Anxiety in Pediatric Patients 1024 575 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

Anxiety disorders are one of the most common mental health diagnoses affecting children, making regular assessment and robust care resources essential to both primary and specialty care practices. Data from 2016-2019 report indicates that nearly 1 in 10 children ages 3-17 have ever been diagnosed with an anxiety disorder — a number believed to have…

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Is 3D Anorectal Manometry Preferable to Traditional Anorectal Manometry in Children With Functional Constipation?
Is 3D Anorectal Manometry Preferable to Traditional Anorectal Manometry in Children With Functional Constipation? 1024 680 Mary Bates, PhD
Close up color photo of little boy holding hands on his belly

Study finds 3D-ARM is less comfortable and does not provide additional information compared to traditional ARM.   In a recent pilot study, researchers from Nationwide Children’s compared outcomes and patient experience of a new three-dimensional (3D) anorectal manometry (ARM) technique compared to regular ARM in children with functional constipation. They found that the use of…

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How Does Allergic Disease Protect Against Developing Asthma After Viral Infection?
How Does Allergic Disease Protect Against Developing Asthma After Viral Infection? 1024 523 Mary Bates, PhD

Neutrophils and IL-4 are critical in preventing post-viral airway disease in mice with pre-existing allergic disease. In a new study, researchers from Nationwide Children’s Hospital show that in a mouse mode simulating human respiratory viral infection, pre-existing allergic disease prevents the development of asthma following viral infection. Further experiments revealed that this protection against post-viral…

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Engineered Viruses Help the Immune System Target Cancer Cells
Engineered Viruses Help the Immune System Target Cancer Cells 1024 623 Lauren Dembeck

The seemingly unlikely “partnership” leads to strong antitumor responses in pediatric tumor models. A recent study from researchers at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, published in the Journal for Immuno Therapy of Cancer, describes how a type of viroimmunotherapy activates the immune system to preferentially target tumor cells. “Pediatric tumor typically lack neoantigens – new proteins that…

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SARS-CoV-2 RNA in the Blood is Associated With Worse Outcomes in Kids
SARS-CoV-2 RNA in the Blood is Associated With Worse Outcomes in Kids 1024 575 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

Researchers have identified a risk factor for more severe illness in children with COVID-19: detectable levels of SARS-CoV-2 RNA circulating in the blood. Children with detectable SARS-CoV-2 RNA in the blood, called RNAemia, were more likely to require oxygen and be admitted to the intensive care unit than children with COVID-19 who did not have…

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Multi-Disciplinary Team Develops Evidence-Based Guidelines for Acute Management of Persistent Pulmonary Hypertension in Newborns
Multi-Disciplinary Team Develops Evidence-Based Guidelines for Acute Management of Persistent Pulmonary Hypertension in Newborns 1024 683 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES
Baby in NICU

What began as an internal effort to simplify practice has transformed into published evidence-based guidelines to standardize care for acute stabilization and management of newborns with pulmonary hypertension.   Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN) is a highly varied and changeable condition that presents a challenge for clinical management, even among tertiary care centers…

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Perceptions About Type 2 Diabetes Differ Among Adolescent Patients, Parents and Physicians
Perceptions About Type 2 Diabetes Differ Among Adolescent Patients, Parents and Physicians 1024 683 JoAnna Pendergrass, DVM

Differing perceptions about type 2 diabetes among teens, parents and physicians can create barriers to diagnosing and managing the disease.   Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is becoming increasingly prevalent in adolescents, with a median age of diagnosis of 13.5 years in the pediatric population. Managing pediatric T2D is challenging, given that traditional medical and non-medical…

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Which Surgical Approach for Catheterizable Channels in Bowel and Bladder Management Is Best?
Which Surgical Approach for Catheterizable Channels in Bowel and Bladder Management Is Best? 150 150 Jessica Nye, PhD

Specific patient characteristics, such as appendix size, may help guide clinicians when deciding which surgical approach to use for patients in need of catheterizable channels for bladder and bowel management. Many patients with neurologic disorders experience urinary and fecal incontinence. The appendix or the transverse ileal tube can be repurposed as a catheterizable channel to…

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Improving Identification of Neonatal Acute Kidney Injury in the NICU
Improving Identification of Neonatal Acute Kidney Injury in the NICU 1024 575 Mary Bates, PhD

Approaches at three different institutions all resulted in improved identification and care of acute kidney injury in newborns. In a new study, researchers describe three different approaches to standardizing the identification and care of acute kidney injury (AKI) in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), including the approach taken at Nationwide Children’s. They report that…

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COVID-19 and Neurologic Manifestations in Children
COVID-19 and Neurologic Manifestations in Children 1024 512 Marlina Lovett, MD
coronavirus

Just weeks after SARS-CoV-2 was identified, global consortiums were formed to combat the pandemic. Health care providers and scientists worked together to learn how SARS-CoV-2 impacted the body, to share information, to generate hypotheses and to develop treatment approaches. The Global Consortium Study of Neurologic Dysfunction in COVID-19 (GCS-NeuroCOVID) was designed to provide insight into…

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What Psychosocial Interventions Are Well Established for the Treatment of Bipolar Disorder in Youth?
What Psychosocial Interventions Are Well Established for the Treatment of Bipolar Disorder in Youth? 150 150 Lauren Dembeck

Clinical psychology researchers at Nationwide Children’s Hospital recently published a comprehensive review of evidence-based psychosocial treatments for bipolar disorder in youth.  Bipolar spectrum disorders (BPSDs) are chronic, recurrent conditions characterized by episodic mood disturbance alternating between periods of depression and (hypo)mania. These conditions are associated with considerable impairment, reduced quality of life, high rates of…

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The Success of an EMR-Based Health-Related Social Needs Screen in Pediatrics
The Success of an EMR-Based Health-Related Social Needs Screen in Pediatrics 1024 683 Deborah L. Ungerleider, MD, FAAP

Standardized universal HRSN screening with an EMR system and follow-up by social work consults can be successful and contribute to reducing health disparities.   Health-related social needs (HRSNs), sometimes referred to as social determinants of health (SODH), are the risk factors of food insecurity, lack of stable housing and poverty, all of which can play…

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Stress Increases Systemic Inflammation and Anxiety in Mouse Model of IBD
Stress Increases Systemic Inflammation and Anxiety in Mouse Model of IBD 1024 606 Mary Bates, PhD

Exposure to stress did not induce a relapse in colitis in the mice. In a new study, researchers at Nationwide Children’s Hospital and the Abigail Wexner Research Institute tested whether exposure to stress would lead to flares of intestinal inflammation in a mouse model of inflammatory bowel disease. They found stress did not exacerbate colitis…

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