Monthly Archives :

October 2016

Stronger Together: A Multi-institutional Database Is Connecting Down Syndrome Clinics for Better Outcomes
Stronger Together: A Multi-institutional Database Is Connecting Down Syndrome Clinics for Better Outcomes 1024 575 Stephanie Santoro, MD

Due to medical advances, people with Down syndrome are living longer than ever before. This increased life expectancy has nearly doubled in the past 25 years. The National Down Syndrome Society estimates that 400,000 people with Down syndrome are living in the United States. Despite this increased life expectancy, little current information on the secondary…

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From Military Zones to Pediatric Trauma Centers, Implementing Massive Transfusion Protocols
From Military Zones to Pediatric Trauma Centers, Implementing Massive Transfusion Protocols 150 150 Abbie Roth

While military and adult research has shown massive transfusion protocols to be lifesaving, implementation and validation in pediatrics lags. When someone is critically injured with life-threatening bleeding, the primary objective of the care team is to stop the bleeding and replace the lost blood. Historically, children in this situation were administered red blood cells (RBCs)…

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Pediatricians and Subspecialists May Need to Up Their ADHD Game
Pediatricians and Subspecialists May Need to Up Their ADHD Game 150 150 Kevin Mayhood

From sixth to eighth grade, Stacy Gibson sought out kids he knew had attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and bought their Ritalin or Adderall, sometimes by the handful. “I would party all night,then I’d take the pills to get through class. It gave me a rush of energy that I needed,” says Gibson, now 32 and in his…

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Solving the Problem of Managing Big Genomic Data
Solving the Problem of Managing Big Genomic Data 150 150 Abbie Roth

Researchers at Nationwide Children’s Hospital complete a first-of-its-kind project to evaluate a large-scale genomic data management system on the scale of up to one million genomes. The influx of genomics data resulting from the increasing affordability of whole exome/genome sequencing and President Obama’s Precision Medicine Initiative requires a novel technological solution to data storage, communication…

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Diagnosing GERD in Neonates? Be Cautious
Diagnosing GERD in Neonates? Be Cautious 150 150 Jeb Phillips

Gastroesophageal reflux disease is likely over-diagnosed in neonates, leading to unnecessary and harmful treatment. Approximately 10 percent of infants born preterm in the United States are diagnosed with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). But it’s almost certain that not all of those babies actually have GERD, say neonatologists at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. The probable over diagnosis leads to…

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A New Use for Kangaroo Care
A New Use for Kangaroo Care 150 150 Kevin Mayhood

A parent’s touch reduces agitation, allows infants and toddlers to remain extubated after heart surgery. A small percentage of babies and young children who have undergone congenital cardiac surgery and early tracheal extubation are treated with a calming parent’s touch at Nationwide Children’s Hospital – a strategy that physicians have found works better in some…

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How Can We Increase the HPV Vaccination Rate?
How Can We Increase the HPV Vaccination Rate? 150 150 Michael T. Brady, MD

Cancer is a terrifying diagnosis for a patient to receive or a doctor to give. So it would make sense that a vaccine proven to prevent cancer would be welcomed by everyone. The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine could prevent 28,500 HPV-related cancer cases – cervical, vaginal, vulvar, anal, rectal, penile and oropharyngeal – each year. The Centers…

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How to Integrate Genomics into Clinical Practice
How to Integrate Genomics into Clinical Practice 150 150 Abbie Roth

Recommendations from the Clinical Genetics Think Tank outline five key areas of focus for bringing genome and exome sequencing into the clinic. Clinical genome and exome sequencing (CGES) as a diagnostic tool is altering practice for clinical geneticists, genetic counselors and other clinical specialists. The Clinical Genetics Think Tank (CGTT) has identified five areas of…

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In Sight: Two Stage Surgery for Epilepsy
In Sight: Two Stage Surgery for Epilepsy 150 150 Abbie Roth

Surgery proves to be a viable option for patients with medically refractory epilepsy. Childhood onset epilepsy affects 1 percent of children worldwide. About 25 to 30 percent of these patients will have medically refractory epilepsy, continuing to have seizures despite using two or more antiseizure medications. Options for this group of patients include intercranial epilepsy surgery, Vagus…

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Great Minds Aren’t Thinking Alike About Asthma Care
Great Minds Aren’t Thinking Alike About Asthma Care 150 150 Brianne Moore

A recent audit of the Pediatric Hospital Information System using template matching finds wide variation in care provided to pediatric asthma patients. While asthma is a common and manageable disease, nine people still die from asthma each day. It is well known that asthma is the leading cause of pediatric hospitalization as well as the…

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One Dose Probiotic Biofilm Protects Against NEC
One Dose Probiotic Biofilm Protects Against NEC 150 150 Kevin Mayhood

Probiotic biofilm enables the beneficial bacteria to withstand stomach acid, promote microbial activity and decrease intestinal inflammation. A single dose of a probiotic biofilm grown on microspheres prevented or significantly reduced the severity of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in animal models of the disease, researchers show. This delivery method not only appears to protect against NEC…

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Novel Practice Pathway Addresses Problem Behaviors Among Patients With Autism
Novel Practice Pathway Addresses Problem Behaviors Among Patients With Autism 150 150 Kevin Mayhood

Pediatricians urged to investigate underlying causes. Issues causing children with autism spectrum disorder to be irritable or belligerent can be difficult for parents, teachers and other care providers to uncover. And, wait times to see a specialist may leave a child frustrated, distressed or in physical pain for months. Primary care physicians who see the…

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How Can You Optimize Care for Homeless Patients?
How Can You Optimize Care for Homeless Patients? 150 150 Tiasha Letostak, PhD

A recent policy statement from the AAP describes how pediatricians can help improve the health and well-being of homeless children in America. As of 2014, the National Center on Family Homelessness reported that a staggering 2.5 million children are homeless each year in America, a historic high representing one in every 30 children in the country. These…

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New Guidelines Better Diagnose Common GI Disorders
New Guidelines Better Diagnose Common GI Disorders 150 150 Jeb Phillips

The new Rome IV criteria offer guidance to common but often misunderstood conditions. Because there are no clear causes of functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs), diagnosis and treatment can be difficult. Some physicians and parents may doubt the disorders exist at all, although pediatric gastroenterologists estimate they affect 30 to 40 percent of children. However, recently…

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A Better Approach to Prescribing Medication
A Better Approach to Prescribing Medication 150 150 Jeb Phillips

A small change in the way a doctor prescribes a medication can make a big difference. Officials from the accountable care organization Partners For Kids use this example all the time: Abilify, a behavioral health drug, is usually priced per pill, not by strength of dose. Two 5 mg pills cost nearly twice the amount of…

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Best Practices for Research Recruitment and Retention
Best Practices for Research Recruitment and Retention 1024 575 Tiasha Letostak, PhD

You can’t obtain study data without participants. From initial design and promotion to communication tactics and patient satisfaction, here are some strategies to ensure success. Advancing pediatric research depends on successful recruitment and retention of study participants. Unfortunately, 9 out of 10 trials end up having to double their original timelines in order to meet…

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Childhood Kidney Stones: Their Surprising Connection to Future Disease
Childhood Kidney Stones: Their Surprising Connection to Future Disease 150 150 Jeb Phillips

Once thought to be an adult condition, urinary stone disease is increasingly found in children – and may be related to the development of cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney disease and low bone density. By one well-regarded estimate, the risk of developing urinary stone disease in childhood doubled between 1997 and 2012. That’s worrying enough on…

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Harnessing the Immune System: Has the Cure for Cancer Been Within Us All Along?
Harnessing the Immune System: Has the Cure for Cancer Been Within Us All Along? 1024 575 Abbie Roth

By learning to manipulate the immune system to target cancer cells, clinician-scientists are ushering in a new era in cancer treatments. The advances in cancer immunotherapy have been headline-making, and some clinical studies have produced stories of near-miraculous recoveries. From the immunotherapy drug credited with curing former president Jimmy Carter’s cancer (pembrolizumab) to the promising…

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Changing the Game: Virtual Reality Distracts From Pain, Transforming the Patient Experience
Changing the Game: Virtual Reality Distracts From Pain, Transforming the Patient Experience 844 487 Gina Bericchia

A first-of-its-kind virtual reality experience from the hemophilia team and design experts at Nationwide Children’s Hospital and The Ohio State University distracts patients with an immersive environment of penguins, pirates and hermit crabs during infusions and other procedures. A pilot study is testing the feasibility of integrating the virtual reality technology into the clinic setting.…

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Minimally-Invasive Technology Proving Itself in Epilepsy Procedures
Minimally-Invasive Technology Proving Itself in Epilepsy Procedures 150 150 Kevin Mayhood

MRI-guided stereotactic laser ablation may become the option of choice for appropriate patients. MRI-guided stereotactic laser ablation is proving comparable to open surgery in several procedures aimed at controlling epilepsy, researchers report. Importantly, patients’ recovery is considerably easier and shorter than recuperation from traditional surgeries, and while thorough studies are needed, early results indicate fewer…

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Use Caution When Prescribing a Gluten-Free Diet
Use Caution When Prescribing a Gluten-Free Diet 150 150 Kevin Mayhood

A gluten-free diet makes diagnosing underlying conditions difficult and can leave potential, long-term consequences unaddressed. The growing popularity of a gluten-free diet among adults appears to be spilling over to children, with help from the pediatrician’s office. “An increasing number of primary care physicians, who are seeing children with symptoms possibly related to gluten intolerance,…

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