Clinical Updates

InSight: Total Pancreatectomy With Islet Autotranplantation: The Basics
InSight: Total Pancreatectomy With Islet Autotranplantation: The Basics 1024 500 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES
illustrated cross section of islets from pancreas

Download a PDF version of this image.       This feature was published in the Fall/Winter 2022 print issue. Download the full issue.  Image credit: Mandy Root-Thompson for Nationwide Children’s

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TPIAT: A Way Forward for Chronic Pancreatitis
TPIAT: A Way Forward for Chronic Pancreatitis 1024 500 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES
illustrated cross section of islets from pancreas

Nationwide Children’s Hospital has assembled a veritable “dream team” of pancreatitis and pediatric transplant surgery experts to offer what they hope will become the world’s preeminent pediatric center for complex pancreatic care. Imagine your child suffering from a sudden, debilitating episode of abdominal pain. No obvious cause, no cure, just pain so severe it requires…

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Integrating Behavioral Health and Primary Care Increases Access and Equity
Integrating Behavioral Health and Primary Care Increases Access and Equity 1024 683 Mary Bates, PhD

With mental health concerns on the rise, more primary care providers are integrating behavioral health services in their practices.  Despite increasing demand for behavioral health care, multiple barriers still exist that limit access for pediatric patients. In recent years, primary care settings across the country have responded by integrating mental health specialists into their practices.…

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Predicting Response to Bronchodilators in Infants with Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia
Predicting Response to Bronchodilators in Infants with Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia 1024 683 Mary Bates, PhD

Study emphasizes importance of identifying those patients who will respond to treatment. Certain pulmonary function test parameters in newborns with bronchopulmonary dysplasia are associated with bronchodilator response, according to a new study from researchers at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. The team also found that responders had evidence of greater dysanaptic lung growth than nonresponders. Bronchodilators are…

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The Latest Developments in Limb Lengthening and Reconstruction Research
The Latest Developments in Limb Lengthening and Reconstruction Research 1024 683 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES
Dr. Iobst with patient

Orthopedic experts publish an invited review of the past year’s most significant papers in the field of limb deformity correction and lengthening. To aid clinicians and surgeons who don’t have time for an annual deep-dive into the literature of their subspecialty, The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery publishes yearly reviews courtesy of invited guest…

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Do Symptom Scores and pH Impedance Correlate in Infants Treated for Gastroesophageal Reflux?
Do Symptom Scores and pH Impedance Correlate in Infants Treated for Gastroesophageal Reflux? 1024 683 Lauren Dembeck

Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) — the passage of gastric contents into the esophagus — is a physiologic process that can be considered normal or abnormal depending on whether troublesome symptoms and/or complications also occur. In infants, it is difficult for clinicians to distinguish between GER and pathophysiologic GER disease (GERD). “Current diagnostic criteria for GERD are…

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Telehealth Has the Potential to Bridge Gaps in Psychiatric and Behavioral Health Care
Telehealth Has the Potential to Bridge Gaps in Psychiatric and Behavioral Health Care 1024 535 Jessica Nye, PhD
Collage of health technology tools

A growing body of evidence supports telebehavioral health delivery for children, adolescents and their families, as outcomes are comparable to in-person treatment delivery. Despite evidence of efficacy, regulatory and financial concerns and technology barriers continue to impede widespread uptake of telebehavioral health. “There have definitely been silver linings to the pandemic, and this is one…

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Quality Improvement Scorecard Enhances Safety for Newborns
Quality Improvement Scorecard Enhances Safety for Newborns 1024 683 Emily Siebenmorgen

The collaborative program between academic and community hospitals improves neonatal care quality. In a recent study published in The Journal of Pediatrics, researchers from Nationwide Children’s Hospital and affiliated level one and two community hospital nurseries implemented a quality improvement (QI) scorecard and found improvements in important perinatal outcomes. “Roughly half of all newborns in…

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Predicting Disease Severity and Assessing Long-Term Outcomes of Pediatric La Crosse Virus
Predicting Disease Severity and Assessing Long-Term Outcomes of Pediatric La Crosse Virus 1024 683 JoAnna Pendergrass, DVM

Limited data exist on mosquito-borne La Crosse Virus in children, underscoring the importance of determining which patients are at risk for severe disease and long-term neurobehavioral difficulties.   La Crosse Virus (LACV) is a neuroinvasive arbovirus spread by the Aedes triseriatus mosquito, causing symptoms such as vomiting, seizures and altered mental status (AMS). Within the…

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Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation Post-COVID: Could Your Patient Benefit?
Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation Post-COVID: Could Your Patient Benefit? 1024 728 Abbie Roth

The road to recovery from COVID-19, the disease caused by SARS-CoV-2, is not always smooth, short or straight. For adults and children, long COVID, a condition where symptoms such as fatigue, headache and decreased respiratory function persist after the virus has “cleared” the body, can add increased stress and hardship. Additionally, even mild cases of…

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BRUE: What Is It? How Is It Treated?
BRUE: What Is It? How Is It Treated? 1024 575 Abbie Roth

BRUE –brief resolved unexplained event – whether you pronounce it brew-EE or brOO, it might be a term you haven’t run across since medical school. In a recent resident-led episode of PediaCast CME, Meghan Fennell, MD, and Vanessa Thiel, MD, break down everything you need to know about BRUE. Listen to the PediaCast CME Episode…

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Functional Neurological Disorders: What Pediatric Neurologists Should Know
Functional Neurological Disorders: What Pediatric Neurologists Should Know 150 150 Mary Bates, PhD

The diagnosis is common, yet this group of disorders has been subjected to confusion and stigma throughout history. Functional neurological disorders are a collection of disorders in which patients experience neurological symptoms, such as numbness, weakness, seizure-like events, or abnormal gait or movements, but without a visible underlying pathology. Underlying mechanisms for these disorders are…

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Nafcillin is a Safe Alternative to Vancomycin for Empirical Treatment of Late-Onset Sepsis Among Infants in the NICU
Nafcillin is a Safe Alternative to Vancomycin for Empirical Treatment of Late-Onset Sepsis Among Infants in the NICU 1024 681 Mary Bates, PhD
sleeping infant

Guidelines to reduce vancomycin use at three Ohio NICUs did not impact mortality rate. In 2014, the Neonatal Antimicrobial Stewardship Program at Nationwide Children’s Hospital recommended nafcillin rather than vancomycin for empirical therapy of possible late-onset sepsis in infants without a history of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection or colonization. In a new study, researchers…

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Strategies and Resources for Managing Anxiety in Pediatric Patients
Strategies and Resources for Managing Anxiety in Pediatric Patients 1024 575 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

Anxiety disorders are one of the most common mental health diagnoses affecting children, making regular assessment and robust care resources essential to both primary and specialty care practices. Data from 2016-2019 report indicates that nearly 1 in 10 children ages 3-17 have ever been diagnosed with an anxiety disorder — a number believed to have…

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Is 3D Anorectal Manometry Preferable to Traditional Anorectal Manometry in Children With Functional Constipation?
Is 3D Anorectal Manometry Preferable to Traditional Anorectal Manometry in Children With Functional Constipation? 1024 680 Mary Bates, PhD
Close up color photo of little boy holding hands on his belly

Study finds 3D-ARM is less comfortable and does not provide additional information compared to traditional ARM.   In a recent pilot study, researchers from Nationwide Children’s compared outcomes and patient experience of a new three-dimensional (3D) anorectal manometry (ARM) technique compared to regular ARM in children with functional constipation. They found that the use of…

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Moving Emergency Medicine Research Forward
Moving Emergency Medicine Research Forward 1024 614 Abbie Roth

Utilizing exception from informed consent studies and a national network of emergency medicine experts, clinician-scientists are advancing research to uncover best practices and improve care. Exception from informed consent (EFIC) is a special rule set utilized by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to support research in emergency situations. The word exception is particularly…

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Multi-Disciplinary Team Develops Evidence-Based Guidelines for Acute Management of Persistent Pulmonary Hypertension in Newborns
Multi-Disciplinary Team Develops Evidence-Based Guidelines for Acute Management of Persistent Pulmonary Hypertension in Newborns 1024 683 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES
Baby in NICU

What began as an internal effort to simplify practice has transformed into published evidence-based guidelines to standardize care for acute stabilization and management of newborns with pulmonary hypertension.   Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN) is a highly varied and changeable condition that presents a challenge for clinical management, even among tertiary care centers…

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Perceptions About Type 2 Diabetes Differ Among Adolescent Patients, Parents and Physicians
Perceptions About Type 2 Diabetes Differ Among Adolescent Patients, Parents and Physicians 1024 683 JoAnna Pendergrass, DVM

Differing perceptions about type 2 diabetes among teens, parents and physicians can create barriers to diagnosing and managing the disease.   Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is becoming increasingly prevalent in adolescents, with a median age of diagnosis of 13.5 years in the pediatric population. Managing pediatric T2D is challenging, given that traditional medical and non-medical…

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Which Surgical Approach for Catheterizable Channels in Bowel and Bladder Management Is Best?
Which Surgical Approach for Catheterizable Channels in Bowel and Bladder Management Is Best? 150 150 Jessica Nye, PhD

Specific patient characteristics, such as appendix size, may help guide clinicians when deciding which surgical approach to use for patients in need of catheterizable channels for bladder and bowel management. Many patients with neurologic disorders experience urinary and fecal incontinence. The appendix or the transverse ileal tube can be repurposed as a catheterizable channel to…

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What Psychosocial Interventions Are Well Established for the Treatment of Bipolar Disorder in Youth?
What Psychosocial Interventions Are Well Established for the Treatment of Bipolar Disorder in Youth? 150 150 Lauren Dembeck

Clinical psychology researchers at Nationwide Children’s Hospital recently published a comprehensive review of evidence-based psychosocial treatments for bipolar disorder in youth.  Bipolar spectrum disorders (BPSDs) are chronic, recurrent conditions characterized by episodic mood disturbance alternating between periods of depression and (hypo)mania. These conditions are associated with considerable impairment, reduced quality of life, high rates of…

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The Success of an EMR-Based Health-Related Social Needs Screen in Pediatrics
The Success of an EMR-Based Health-Related Social Needs Screen in Pediatrics 1024 683 Deborah L. Ungerleider, MD, FAAP

Standardized universal HRSN screening with an EMR system and follow-up by social work consults can be successful and contribute to reducing health disparities.   Health-related social needs (HRSNs), sometimes referred to as social determinants of health (SODH), are the risk factors of food insecurity, lack of stable housing and poverty, all of which can play…

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First Multicenter, Prospective Study of Surgical Approach and Short-term Outcomes in Patients Undergoing Total Pancreatectomy With Islet Autotransplantation
First Multicenter, Prospective Study of Surgical Approach and Short-term Outcomes in Patients Undergoing Total Pancreatectomy With Islet Autotransplantation 150 150 Lauren Dembeck

The goal of the prospective study is to critically evaluate current clinical practices to determine which should be adopted or abandoned. It will also provide an opportunity to evaluate patients’ quality of life after total pancreatectomy with islet autotransplantation.   For children and adults with debilitating pancreatitis that fails to respond to medical and endoscopic…

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The Importance of Body Composition in Cystic Fibrosis
The Importance of Body Composition in Cystic Fibrosis 150 150 Mary Bates, PhD

Lean mass deficits are common in pediatric patients with cystic fibrosis and associated with impaired lung and bone health. Now, experts are calling for increased use of body composition measurements in clinical care.  In cystic fibrosis — a multisystem disorder characterized by progressive lung disease, pancreatic insufficiency, malabsorption and malnutrition — nutrition status is correlated with…

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Postoperative Management of Flexor Tendon Injuries in Children
Postoperative Management of Flexor Tendon Injuries in Children 150 150 Mary Bates, PhD

One month of immobilization followed by a modified Duran protocol leads to good outcomes. Pediatric flexor tendon injuries can be challenging due to children’s smaller anatomy and possible treatment nonadherence. In adults, immediate to early active motion for flexor tendon repairs has become standard, as prolonged postoperative immobilization can lead to adhesion formation and joint…

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Pediatric Bone Density Measures Require Adjusted Scoring for Accurate Interpretation
Pediatric Bone Density Measures Require Adjusted Scoring for Accurate Interpretation 1024 575 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

Understanding the limits of pediatric bone densitometry reports can make results more useful for clinical decision making. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, or DXA, is the standard scan used to assess bone mineral density (BMD) in children. It uses very little radiation and has extensive normative data from pediatric populations, to which a child’s results can be…

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Short- and Long-Term Kidney Issues in Children Treated for Leukemia
Short- and Long-Term Kidney Issues in Children Treated for Leukemia 720 480 Mary Bates, PhD

While outcomes for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have improved, researchers are finding long-term effects on kidney function that require monitoring. In a new study published recently in Pediatric Nephrology, researchers from Nationwide Children’s report the incidence of hypertension and kidney issues in pediatric patients diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia over a recent nine-year period.…

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What is “Normal” Thyroid Functioning in Preterm Infants?
What is “Normal” Thyroid Functioning in Preterm Infants? 1024 683 Mary Bates, PhD
Baby in NICU

Study provides one of the largest samples of thyroid values in preterm infants to establish reference intervals. Preterm infants are born with an immature hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis, putting them at risk for hypothyroidism from a delayed rise in thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). Currently in the United States, the thyroid function of all infants is evaluated within the…

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Making Exercise Part of Your Treatment Plan: Play Strong for Children With ASD
Making Exercise Part of Your Treatment Plan: Play Strong for Children With ASD 150 150 Deborah L. Ungerleider, MD, FAAP

How can clinicians use exercise in their treatment of behavioral and mental health disorders? Experts share lessons learned from the Play Strong program.   It is well-known in the medical world that exercise is good for the mind and body, both for children and adults. However, although health care providers may recommend that exercise be…

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NCHart-1 a New Approach to Estimating Total Body Surface Area Burn Percentages
NCHart-1 a New Approach to Estimating Total Body Surface Area Burn Percentages 150 150 Abbie Roth

The new chart reduces math errors, improving accuracy for better outcomes. When a child has a burn injury, immediate care is essential. Fluid administration and treatment resources needed are decisions made in the field by emergency medical technicians (EMTs) and paramedics. Both decisions hinge on what percent of the child’s skin has burns. This number…

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Multiple Fractures in Children: When to Suspect Medical or Malevolent Causes
Multiple Fractures in Children: When to Suspect Medical or Malevolent Causes 1024 770 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES
Girl with cast on her arm

Rapid growth and high-risk activities during childhood leave kids ripe for repeat fracture opportunities, but key factors can alert clinicians to possible underlying disease-related fragility or non-accidental injury. Fractures are common in childhood, with up to 40% of girls and as many as 50% of boys experiencing a fracture. There are many benign explanations for…

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Zero Suicide: A Comprehensive Framework for Pediatric Hospitals
Zero Suicide: A Comprehensive Framework for Pediatric Hospitals 1024 683 Mary Bates, PhD
Sad black teenage girl

Key elements of the program include leadership support, practical tools and training for staff, and a quality improvement infrastructure. Suicide is the second leading cause of death among 10- to 24-year-olds, and the number of youths presenting to pediatric hospitals for suicide-related concerns has doubled in recent years. Suicide is more than just a mental…

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Children Testing Positive for X-ALD on Updated Newborn Screening Panels Require Long-Term Monitoring
Children Testing Positive for X-ALD on Updated Newborn Screening Panels Require Long-Term Monitoring 1024 575 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

A condition soon to be added to the Ohio Newborn Screening Panel may not affect children for years or even decades after diagnosis, and follow-up involves more than just the infant. Hospitals across the country collect a card of small drops of blood from a baby’s heel shortly after birth. These “bloodspots” are used to…

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Iron Deficiency and Fatigue Among Adolescents With Heavy Menstrual Bleeding
Iron Deficiency and Fatigue Among Adolescents With Heavy Menstrual Bleeding 1024 673 Mary Bates, PhD

Both iron deficiency and fatigue are common in adolescents with heavy menstrual bleeding and may not indicate presence of a bleeding disorder. In a new multicenter study of nearly 200 adolescents with heavy menstrual bleeding, researchers found a high prevalence of iron deficiency without concomitant anemia as well as a high prevalence of fatigue. The…

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Challenges and Experiences of LGBTQI+ Parents Regarding Infant Feeding
Challenges and Experiences of LGBTQI+ Parents Regarding Infant Feeding 1024 681 Mary Bates, PhD
sleeping infant

New study identifies challenges faced by LGBTQI+ parents, factors that can help healthcare providers improve their support. A new study is the first to explore the experiences of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer/Questioning, or Intersex, Plus (LGBTQI+) parents and identify the factors that influence their decisions on infant nutrition. The authors of the report say…

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From 1 to 1,000: How Robotic Technology Has Brought Surgeons Together at Nationwide Children’s Hospital
From 1 to 1,000: How Robotic Technology Has Brought Surgeons Together at Nationwide Children’s Hospital 1024 683 Marc Michalsky, MD, MBA, Karen Diefenbach, MD, Molly Fuchs, MD and Daniel DaJusta, MD

This month marks an important milestone for patients receiving care at Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus, Ohio: the completion of our 1,000th minimally invasive case using the DaVinci Robotic System. Nationwide Children’s was one of the first large children’s hospitals in the country to acquire a robotic system (2013) and like many, the decision was…

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High Rate of Urologic Anomalies in Children With Anorectal Malformations
High Rate of Urologic Anomalies in Children With Anorectal Malformations 150 150 Lauren Dembeck

Early recognition of urologic problems through proactive screening and urologic collaboration may help prevent of renal deterioration and allow for timely treatment in this population.   Researchers at Nationwide Children’s Hospital have recently demonstrated that urologic anomalies occur at a high rate in children with anorectal malformations and appear to increase in frequency with increasing…

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Identifying Which Children with Nephrotic Syndrome Will Respond to Steroids
Identifying Which Children with Nephrotic Syndrome Will Respond to Steroids 1024 683 Mary Bates, PhD

New research identifies potential biomarkers in the plasma of children with steroid resistant nephrotic syndrome. Nephrotic syndrome is among the most common forms of kidney disease in children. Although glucocorticoids (i.e., steroids) are the primary treatment, approximately 10 to 20% of children with nephrotic syndrome present with or develop steroid resistance. This is only discovered…

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Therapy With Double-Bright Natural Killer Cell Infusions Increases Response Rates Among Frail Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia
Therapy With Double-Bright Natural Killer Cell Infusions Increases Response Rates Among Frail Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia 969 533 Jessica Nye, PhD
Illustration of NK Cells, T Cells, other immune cells floating across white background

A case series of 13 patients with relapsed/refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML) finds that a novel approach using repeated infusions of cultured natural killer (NK) cells increases overall and complete response rates. NK cells are lymphocytes – white blood cell components of the innate immune response – that have anti-leukemic properties. Although efforts to incorporate…

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Treating Intrauterine Opioid Exposure in Infants Born Preterm
Treating Intrauterine Opioid Exposure in Infants Born Preterm 1024 575 Deborah L. Ungerleider, MD, FAAP

We need a protocol to evaluate and treat neonatal abstinence syndrome in preterm infants. Neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) occurs when infants who are exposed to opioids in utero develop withdrawal signs and symptoms after birth.1 According to past studies, NAS occurs in 55% to 94% of infants exposed to opioids, with an increasing incidence between…

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A Patient-Centered Medical Home for Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease
A Patient-Centered Medical Home for Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease 1024 683 Mary Bates, PhD

The Center for Pediatric and Adolescent IBD serves as a case study for comprehensive, multidisciplinary care. In a new paper published in Inflammatory Bowel Disease, researchers from Nationwide Children’s describe the multidisciplinary care model at the Center for Pediatric and Adolescent Inflammatory Bowel Disease as an example of a pediatric specialty medical home. The researchers…

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Validity of the WISC-V Intelligence Testing in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder
Validity of the WISC-V Intelligence Testing in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder 1024 575 Mary Bates, PhD

Evaluating thinking and reasoning abilities for children with autism using conventional intelligence tests can be done, but with some caution. The Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, Fifth Edition (WISC-V) is one of the most widely used intelligence tests for children. However, little is known about the validity of this test in children with autism spectrum…

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Codetection of Respiratory Bacteria in Infants With RSV Infection Associated With Worse Outcomes
Codetection of Respiratory Bacteria in Infants With RSV Infection Associated With Worse Outcomes 1024 575 Lauren Dembeck
Color photo of Black father holding infant on shoulder in front of nursery background with clouds on the wall

The interaction between the bacteria and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) appears to be synergistic. Researchers are now working to understand the underlying biological mechanisms. Researchers at Nationwide Children’s Hospital have discovered that codetection of Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae in the upper respiratory tract of previously healthy infants with RSV infection was independently associated with…

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Microsurgery for Acute Flaccid Myelitis: Personalized Approach Leads to Remarkable Recoveries
Microsurgery for Acute Flaccid Myelitis: Personalized Approach Leads to Remarkable Recoveries 1024 440 Lauren Dembeck

Children from around the world are coming to Nationwide Children’s for specialized care for AFM with lower extremity involvement. Dr. Amy Moore invented many of the procedures that are leading to remarkable recoveries for these patients. After an ordinary cold, most people continue with life as usual; however, in some rare cases, a previously healthy…

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Learning in Real Time to Overcome COVID-19 and MIS-C
Learning in Real Time to Overcome COVID-19 and MIS-C 1024 491 Natalie Wilson
Illustrations of clock faces at different times and angles

When multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) emerged in May 2020, the new condition made headlines. Although rare, MIS-C can appear in kids about a month after they’ve recovered from infections with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19 — even if they haven’t felt sick at all. “We don’t know why some children develop MIS-C,”…

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Lubiprostone Found to be Safe, as Effective as Placebo in Children With Constipation
Lubiprostone Found to be Safe, as Effective as Placebo in Children With Constipation 1024 680 Mary Bates, PhD
Close up color photo of little boy holding hands on his belly

The medication, FDA-approved for adults, may benefit older pediatric patients with less of a behavioral component to their constipation. Pediatric functional constipation, though common, remains challenging to treat. Lubiprostone is a medication approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of constipation and irritable bowel syndrome with constipation in adults. In…

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Long-Term Follow-up Study Shows Cannabidiol is Safe and Effective for Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome
Long-Term Follow-up Study Shows Cannabidiol is Safe and Effective for Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome 695 473 Mary Bates, PhD
Black and white environmental portrait of Dr. Anup Patel standing in the hospital in his lab coat with his hand in his pocket

Long-term treatment with highly purified plant-based CBD shows continued seizure reduction and no new side effects. The results of a long-term open-label extension trial of plant-derived, highly purified cannabidiol (CBD) show the treatment is effective and safe long term for patients with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. The treatment had a similar safety profile as in the original…

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Targeted Muscle Reinnervation for Amputees Offers Chance at Less Pain, More Prosthetic Options
Targeted Muscle Reinnervation for Amputees Offers Chance at Less Pain, More Prosthetic Options 1024 684 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

The innovative procedure pioneered by surgeons at The Ohio State University and Nationwide Children’s Hospital reduces postoperative pain and enables control of bioprosthetics.   What started as Department of Defense-funded research in adult amputees at The Ohio State University Medical Center about 6 years ago has morphed into standard of care treatment for children undergoing…

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Ask A Specialist: Management of Labial Adhesions in Prepubertal Girls
Ask A Specialist: Management of Labial Adhesions in Prepubertal Girls 1024 680 Geri Hewitt, MD

What is the appropriate management of asymptomatic and symptomatic labial adhesions in a prepubertal girl? The management of labial adhesions has really evolved over time. The most important thing is to make sure you have the correct diagnosis and it’s not some other problem with the vagina opening. Labial adhesions are isolated (not associated with…

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Ask A Specialist: When Should Patients With Molluscum Contagiosum Be Referred to Dermatology?
Ask A Specialist: When Should Patients With Molluscum Contagiosum Be Referred to Dermatology? 1024 575 Patricia Witman, MD
Toddler playing with toys

What are the current treatment recommendations for moderate to severe molluscum, and when would you suggest referring to a dermatologist? Molluscum contagiosum is an infection caused by a virus that typically results in benign, mild skin disease characterized by lesions (Mollusca) that are small, raised and usually white, pink or flesh colored with a dimple…

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Specialized Treatment for Severe Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia Increases Survival
Specialized Treatment for Severe Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia Increases Survival 150 150 Mary Bates, PhD

Most infants with established BPD referred to Nationwide’s BPD Center improve and survive, despite the severity of their illness. In a new study, researchers analyzed the in-hospital outcomes for preterm infants with established bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) referred to Nationwide Children’s Comprehensive Center for BPD. They found that despite the high degree of illness severity in…

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