Monthly Archives :

November 2018

Child Sex Trafficking in the U.S. is Real — and a New Tool can Help Doctors Identify Victims
Child Sex Trafficking in the U.S. is Real — and a New Tool can Help Doctors Identify Victims 150 150 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

Researchers exploring the alarmingly high prevalence of child sex trafficking in the United States have validated a practical tool for identifying victims in multiple health care settings. At least one in every 10 minors visiting emergency departments, child advocacy centers and teen clinics for sexual trauma or assault are victims of child sex trafficking, according…

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Researchers Identify Proteins Triggering Imbalance of Cells in Chronic Lung Disease
Researchers Identify Proteins Triggering Imbalance of Cells in Chronic Lung Disease 1024 575 Kevin Mayhood
Illustration of lungs on blue silhouette of upper chest on black background

A protein that triggers an imbalance of mucous and ciliated cells in patients with chronic lung disease could be a target for treatments to restore airways. Many chronic lung diseases in children and adults have one thing in common: the airway lining that normally traps and sweeps out bacteria, viruses and diesel particulates stops functioning…

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DNA Variations Associated With Prolonged Walking in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy
DNA Variations Associated With Prolonged Walking in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy 1024 575 Kevin Mayhood
boy with muscular dystrophy completing walk test

Genome-wide association study identifies two variants that may yield therapies for children with DMD. Researchers at Nationwide Children’s have found that two DNA variants that play a role in gene regulation are associated with prolonged ability to walk in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Kevin Flanigan, MD, director of the Center for Gene Therapy,…

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Big Gains in FSHD Research: A Newly Published Model of FSHD and a Potential Gene Therapy to Improve Functional Outcomes
Big Gains in FSHD Research: A Newly Published Model of FSHD and a Potential Gene Therapy to Improve Functional Outcomes 150 150 Abbie Roth

The model aims to provide the basis for many future studies to bring therapeutic options to patients with FSHD. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is the most prevalent dominantly inherited muscular dystrophy in the world. To date, there are no pharmacologic treatments available for the more than 850,000 people affected worldwide. Developing models to use for…

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Wishes Help Keep Pediatric Patients Out of the Hospital
Wishes Help Keep Pediatric Patients Out of the Hospital 150 150 Gina Bericchia

Cimone Stills, 15, has a medical condition that has caused her to have multiple seizures a day for most of her life. Specifically, she has treatment-resistant generalized epilepsy because of a genetic variation. Like many patients with such a serious illness, it affects her daily life and as a result, she was diagnosed with clinical…

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Grandparents Raising Grandchildren: “They Get the Job Done”
Grandparents Raising Grandchildren: “They Get the Job Done” 1024 575 Abbie Roth

Research presented at the American Academy of Pediatrics 2018 National Conference finds that the growing number of grandparents serving as sole caregivers for their grandchildren are coping well. In the United States, millions of children are being raised solely by their grandparents. As the opioid crisis and other factors continue to disrupt families, experts expect the number…

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Smoke Alarms Using Mother’s Voice Wake Children Better than High-Pitch Tone Alarms
Smoke Alarms Using Mother’s Voice Wake Children Better than High-Pitch Tone Alarms 1024 575 Laura Dattner
Color image of young boy asleep in bed

When residential fires happen at night while people are sleeping, deaths are more likely to occur. Smoke alarms are important for preventing these deaths, yet many young children don’t wake up to traditional high-pitch tone alarms. In a study published in The Journal of Pediatrics, researchers in the Center for Injury Research and Policy and the Sleep Disorders Center at Nationwide…

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Primary Care for Refugee Children: What Providers Need to Know
Primary Care for Refugee Children: What Providers Need to Know 1024 575 Aimee Swartz, MPH
Toddler playing with toys

The growing number of refugee children across the United States means that more pediatricians need to be aware of the unique health needs of this population. The world’s estimated refugee population has surged to 24.5 million individuals – more than half of whom are children – at United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) last count. Many…

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