Research

Significant Weight Gain Observed in Low-Income Youth During the Early COVID-19 Pandemic
Significant Weight Gain Observed in Low-Income Youth During the Early COVID-19 Pandemic 150 150 JoAnna Pendergrass, DVM

Low-income youth experienced significant weight gain during the first six months of the COVID-19 pandemic, highlighting the need for simultaneous childhood obesity prevention and treatment.   The COVID-19 pandemic and subsequent mitigation efforts profoundly affected children. Specifically, remote learning and cancellation of extracurricular activities disrupted children’s daily routines and reduced opportunities for physical activity, increasing…

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TPIAT: A Way Forward for Chronic Pancreatitis
TPIAT: A Way Forward for Chronic Pancreatitis 1024 500 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES
illustrated cross section of islets from pancreas

Nationwide Children’s Hospital has assembled a veritable “dream team” of pancreatitis and pediatric transplant surgery experts to offer what they hope will become the world’s preeminent pediatric center for complex pancreatic care. Imagine your child suffering from a sudden, debilitating episode of abdominal pain. No obvious cause, no cure, just pain so severe it requires…

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Understanding Pediatric Critical COVID-19 Disease Around the World
Understanding Pediatric Critical COVID-19 Disease Around the World 150 150 Natalie Wilson

A large, multinational study found more children hospitalized with critical COVID-19 died than was indicated by previous studies.   Children under 18 represent around 22% of the population in the United States. Yet, just 15% of over 75 million U.S. COVID-19 cases reported to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and fewer than 0.2% of over…

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Multimodal Molecular Profiles Offer Clinically Valuable Information to Oncologists
Multimodal Molecular Profiles Offer Clinically Valuable Information to Oncologists 150 150 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

Expanding the profiling ordered for central nervous system (CNS) tumors may meaningfully impact diagnosis and treatment. Prajwal Rajappa, MD, MS, a physician-scientist and principal investigator for the Steve and Cindy Rasmussen Institute for Genomic Medicine (IGM) at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, has long advocated for a more robust use of precision medicine approaches to improve clinicians’…

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Brain Organoids Provide Novel Mechanistic Insight into Microcephaly Associated with AUTS2 Syndrome
Brain Organoids Provide Novel Mechanistic Insight into Microcephaly Associated with AUTS2 Syndrome 873 552 Lauren Dembeck
Microscopy image of cerebral organoid sections

Researchers have functionally validated a genotype-phenotype relationship between a variant in the AUTS2 gene and neurodevelopmental deficits in AUTS2 syndrome using patient-derived brain organoids. Genetic variants in more than 100 genes, including the gene AUTS2, have been associated with autism spectrum disorders. However, the model systems used to study the mechanisms underlying how these genetic…

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Quality of Life in Pediatric Patients With Non-ambulatory Cerebral Palsy and Epilepsy
Quality of Life in Pediatric Patients With Non-ambulatory Cerebral Palsy and Epilepsy 600 400 Mary Bates, PhD

Study indicates that quality of life in young people with non-ambulatory cerebral palsy decreases with the use of more antiseizure medications. In a new study, researchers from Nationwide Children’s Hospital assessed the relationship between epilepsy-specific characteristics and proxy-reported health-related quality of life in children and young people with non-ambulatory cerebral palsy. The findings indicate that…

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Anal Sphincter Botox Injections for Children With Severe Constipation
Anal Sphincter Botox Injections for Children With Severe Constipation 1024 680 Mary Bates, PhD
Close up color photo of little boy holding hands on his belly

The treatment is safe and effective for many children with Hirschsprung disease and, to a lesser extent, functional constipation. In a new prospective study, researchers at Nationwide Children’s evaluated children with severe, refractory constipation treated with anal sphincter botulinum toxin (Botox) injection. They found the treatment can be effective in patients with both Hirschsprung disease…

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Long-Term Pulmonary Symptoms Following COVID-19 Infection in Children
Long-Term Pulmonary Symptoms Following COVID-19 Infection in Children 1024 683 Mary Bates, PhD

Fatigue and shortness of breath may persist, even in the absence of abnormal test results. Researchers at Nationwide Children’s recently published the largest U.S. study to date of pediatric patients with long-term pulmonary sequelae following COVID-19 infection. The authors note the persistence of symptoms such as shortness of breath and fatigue and highlight at least…

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Do Symptom Scores and pH Impedance Correlate in Infants Treated for Gastroesophageal Reflux?
Do Symptom Scores and pH Impedance Correlate in Infants Treated for Gastroesophageal Reflux? 1024 683 Lauren Dembeck

Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) — the passage of gastric contents into the esophagus — is a physiologic process that can be considered normal or abnormal depending on whether troublesome symptoms and/or complications also occur. In infants, it is difficult for clinicians to distinguish between GER and pathophysiologic GER disease (GERD). “Current diagnostic criteria for GERD are…

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What’s the Scope of Nephritis in Pediatric Patients With IgA Vasculitis?
What’s the Scope of Nephritis in Pediatric Patients With IgA Vasculitis? 150 150 Jessica Nye, PhD

A multicenter study from the Pediatric Nephrology Research Consortium found that many pediatric patients with IgA vasculitis nephritis (IgAVN) are treated with immunosuppressive (IS) agents, and some had evidence of chronic kidney disease as early as 12 months after presentation.   IgA vasculitis (IgAV) is the most common vasculitis in children, usually presenting with typical…

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Researchers Characterize Growth and Remodeling of Tissue-Engineered Blood Vessels
Researchers Characterize Growth and Remodeling of Tissue-Engineered Blood Vessels 600 400 Lauren Dembeck
Tissue engineered vascular graft

Tissue engineering may soon give babies with congenital heart disease new blood vessels capable of native function and growth.   Major cardiovascular reconstructive operations in babies with congenital heart defects require the use of artificial blood vessels called vascular grafts. Because these grafts are made of man-made materials, the recipients’ tissues eventually begin to outgrow…

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How Do Children With IBD and Their Caregivers Perceive Biosimilars?
How Do Children With IBD and Their Caregivers Perceive Biosimilars? 640 427 JoAnna Pendergrass, DVM

Many pediatric patients with inflammatory bowel disease and their caregivers are unaware of biosimilars, creating an opportunity for providers to educate patients and their families about this effective and less expensive treatment option. Infliximab is a biologic therapy that effectively manages inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in adult and pediatric patients. However, biologic therapies are expensive,…

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Featured Researcher — Ashley Jackson, PhD
Featured Researcher — Ashley Jackson, PhD 150 150 Natalie Wilson

Ashley Jackson, PhD, is a principal investigator in The Kidney and Urinary Tract Center at Nationwide Children’s studying renal urothelium, the special surface tissue that lines most of the urinary tract, or the drainage system of the kidneys, to slow kidney disease progression in children with urinary tract obstruction (UTO), or a blockage that prevents…

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Self-Harm Risk Among Youth With First-Episode Psychosis
Self-Harm Risk Among Youth With First-Episode Psychosis 1024 575 Mary Bates, PhD

Study narrows down period of acute risk and finds shared and unique risk factors among adolescents and young adults. Although it is known that young people with psychosis are at an elevated risk for suicide and suicide-related behavior, it has not been clear which patients are at the most risk and when. In a new…

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Variability in Cardiac Diagnostics and Therapies for Patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy
Variability in Cardiac Diagnostics and Therapies for Patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy 1024 670 Mary Bates, PhD

Survey shows different approaches to cardiac diagnostics and therapy among a multicenter collaborative network. Cardiac disease is a major cause of mortality in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), yet data regarding outcomes and cardiac disease progression are lacking. This has led to a highly variable approach to heart failure therapy in DMD from center to center,…

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The True History of the Nuremberg Code: Leo Alexander’s Blueprint Uncovered
The True History of the Nuremberg Code: Leo Alexander’s Blueprint Uncovered 150 150 Abbie Roth

An investigation of Duke University’s Medical Center’s Archives boxes labeled “Alexander’s Papers” reveals a document containing six principles, which were included nearly word-for-word in the Nuremberg Code.  At the end of the famous Doctors’ Trial, the trial of Nazi doctors for their crimes and treatment of people who were identified as “research participants,” Judge Sebring…

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When Functional Outcomes Are Achieved Post-Op, Do Patients and Families Care About Scarring?
When Functional Outcomes Are Achieved Post-Op, Do Patients and Families Care About Scarring? 1024 683 Abbie Roth

A recent editorial from Dr. Daniel DaJusta questions whether cosmetic concerns after surgery are primarily driven by surgeons, patients or parents. It is widely accepted that having a smaller, neater or less visible scar following surgery is a preferable cosmetic outcome to a large, ragged or highly visible scar. This is supported anecdotally by surgeons,…

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Is 3D Anorectal Manometry Preferable to Traditional Anorectal Manometry in Children With Functional Constipation?
Is 3D Anorectal Manometry Preferable to Traditional Anorectal Manometry in Children With Functional Constipation? 1024 680 Mary Bates, PhD
Close up color photo of little boy holding hands on his belly

Study finds 3D-ARM is less comfortable and does not provide additional information compared to traditional ARM.   In a recent pilot study, researchers from Nationwide Children’s compared outcomes and patient experience of a new three-dimensional (3D) anorectal manometry (ARM) technique compared to regular ARM in children with functional constipation. They found that the use of…

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How Does Allergic Disease Protect Against Developing Asthma After Viral Infection?
How Does Allergic Disease Protect Against Developing Asthma After Viral Infection? 1024 523 Mary Bates, PhD

Neutrophils and IL-4 are critical in preventing post-viral airway disease in mice with pre-existing allergic disease. In a new study, researchers from Nationwide Children’s Hospital show that in a mouse mode simulating human respiratory viral infection, pre-existing allergic disease prevents the development of asthma following viral infection. Further experiments revealed that this protection against post-viral…

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Engineered Viruses Help the Immune System Target Cancer Cells
Engineered Viruses Help the Immune System Target Cancer Cells 1024 623 Lauren Dembeck

The seemingly unlikely “partnership” leads to strong antitumor responses in pediatric tumor models. A recent study from researchers at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, published in the Journal for Immuno Therapy of Cancer, describes how a type of viroimmunotherapy activates the immune system to preferentially target tumor cells. “Pediatric tumor typically lack neoantigens – new proteins that…

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SARS-CoV-2 RNA in the Blood is Associated With Worse Outcomes in Kids
SARS-CoV-2 RNA in the Blood is Associated With Worse Outcomes in Kids 1024 575 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

Researchers have identified a risk factor for more severe illness in children with COVID-19: detectable levels of SARS-CoV-2 RNA circulating in the blood. Children with detectable SARS-CoV-2 RNA in the blood, called RNAemia, were more likely to require oxygen and be admitted to the intensive care unit than children with COVID-19 who did not have…

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Improving Identification of Neonatal Acute Kidney Injury in the NICU
Improving Identification of Neonatal Acute Kidney Injury in the NICU 1024 575 Mary Bates, PhD

Approaches at three different institutions all resulted in improved identification and care of acute kidney injury in newborns. In a new study, researchers describe three different approaches to standardizing the identification and care of acute kidney injury (AKI) in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), including the approach taken at Nationwide Children’s. They report that…

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Stress Increases Systemic Inflammation and Anxiety in Mouse Model of IBD
Stress Increases Systemic Inflammation and Anxiety in Mouse Model of IBD 1024 606 Mary Bates, PhD

Exposure to stress did not induce a relapse in colitis in the mice. In a new study, researchers at Nationwide Children’s Hospital and the Abigail Wexner Research Institute tested whether exposure to stress would lead to flares of intestinal inflammation in a mouse model of inflammatory bowel disease. They found stress did not exacerbate colitis…

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First Multicenter, Prospective Study of Surgical Approach and Short-term Outcomes in Patients Undergoing Total Pancreatectomy With Islet Autotransplantation
First Multicenter, Prospective Study of Surgical Approach and Short-term Outcomes in Patients Undergoing Total Pancreatectomy With Islet Autotransplantation 150 150 Lauren Dembeck

The goal of the prospective study is to critically evaluate current clinical practices to determine which should be adopted or abandoned. It will also provide an opportunity to evaluate patients’ quality of life after total pancreatectomy with islet autotransplantation.   For children and adults with debilitating pancreatitis that fails to respond to medical and endoscopic…

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Epilepsy Centers in United States Expand in Size and Specialized Testing Services with Accreditation
Epilepsy Centers in United States Expand in Size and Specialized Testing Services with Accreditation 150 150 Rebecca Cybulski

Recent data is used to analyze characteristics of accredited epilepsy centers across the United States, including testing, treatment and outcomes for drug resistant epilepsy patients. New research from the Abigail Wexner Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospital has found that as a result of the increased number of accredited epilepsy centers in the United States, drug-resistant epilepsy…

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Exploring Dopamine Genotype as a Moderator of the Effect of Parental Behavior on Children’s Self-Control
Exploring Dopamine Genotype as a Moderator of the Effect of Parental Behavior on Children’s Self-Control 150 150 Daphne Vrantsidis, PhD

Did you know developmental psychologists have found the secret to life success? It’s not eating your vegetables or doing your homework or anything else your parents or teachers told you growing up. It’s how long you waited to eat a marshmallow when you were 4 years old. Delaying gratification — waiting 5 minutes to eat…

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First In Human
First In Human 150 150 Abbie Roth

The Heart Center at Nationwide Children’s Hospital has a long history of helping to bring innovations from the lab to the patient. The latest, the Autus Valve, aims to improve care and outcomes for children with pulmonary valve disease. In December 2021, Mark Galantowicz, MD, cardiothoracic surgeon and director of The Heart Center at Nationwide…

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An Epigenetic Vulnerability for Rhabdomyosarcoma Among Children?
An Epigenetic Vulnerability for Rhabdomyosarcoma Among Children? 150 150 Jessica Nye, PhD

A deep classification of epigenetic machinery in rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) tumors finds that the mammalian SWItch/Sucrose Non-Fermentable (mSWI/SNF) complexes are essential for the stabilization of RMS.   A recent study, published in Nature Communications, by Ben Stanton, PhD, and colleagues focused on rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), a lethal pediatric soft tissue malignancy. Fusion positive RMS (FP-RMS) has properties…

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Polyethylene Glycol 3350 Does Not Lead to Behavior Changes in Animal Model
Polyethylene Glycol 3350 Does Not Lead to Behavior Changes in Animal Model 1024 683 Mary Bates, PhD

The laxative affected stool consistency and gut bacteria but did not alter anxiety-like behavior in mice. Polyethylene glycol 3350 (PEG3350) is a laxative commonly used to treat constipation in children. Over the years, the Food and Drug Administration has received some reports of neuropsychiatric symptoms in children administered PEG3350, including anxiety, aggression and obsessive-compulsive behaviors.…

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Repeated Injury to Stem Cells Could be a Significant Contributor to Chronic Lung Disease
Repeated Injury to Stem Cells Could be a Significant Contributor to Chronic Lung Disease 1024 575 Abbie Roth
Illustration of lungs on blue silhouette of upper chest on black background

A series of experiments shows that biological aging of tracheobronchial stem cells could drive the development of chronic lung disease. In a recent publication in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine (SCTM), researchers showed that repeated injury to epithelial cells in the airway caused biological aging of the stem cells located there. Tracheobronchial stem cells (TSCs) are…

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Lubiprostone Found to be Safe, as Effective as Placebo in Children With Constipation
Lubiprostone Found to be Safe, as Effective as Placebo in Children With Constipation 1024 680 Mary Bates, PhD
Close up color photo of little boy holding hands on his belly

The medication, FDA-approved for adults, may benefit older pediatric patients with less of a behavioral component to their constipation. Pediatric functional constipation, though common, remains challenging to treat. Lubiprostone is a medication approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of constipation and irritable bowel syndrome with constipation in adults. In…

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Kidney and Urinary Tract Protein Demonstrates Antimicrobial Activity
Kidney and Urinary Tract Protein Demonstrates Antimicrobial Activity 1024 683 Lauren Dembeck

A little-studied peptide found in the urinary tract is a potential biomarker for urinary tract infection risk and could be developed into a novel therapeutic against drug-resistant bacteria.  Researchers at Nationwide Children’s Hospital have demonstrated that an understudied protein expressed in the human kidney and bladder kills the bacteria that cause urinary tract infections (UTI).…

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A Novel FUS/ETV4 Fusion and Other Rare FET/ETS Fusion Proteins Are Bona Fide Ewing Sarcoma
A Novel FUS/ETV4 Fusion and Other Rare FET/ETS Fusion Proteins Are Bona Fide Ewing Sarcoma 1024 575 Jessica Nye, PhD

Researchers conduct a molecular comparison between the established EWS/FLI translocation with rarer FET/ETS fusions, broadly supporting the inclusion of FET/ETS chimeric proteins in Ewing Sarcoma diagnosis and treatment.   Ewing sarcoma, most commonly caused by a chromosomal translocation of the amino-terminal domain of EWSR1 with the transcription factor FLI (EWS/FLI), presents as an aggressive pediatric…

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Identifying Early Urinary Biomarkers of Kidney Damage in Type 1 Diabetes
Identifying Early Urinary Biomarkers of Kidney Damage in Type 1 Diabetes 1024 575 Mary Bates, PhD

Markers of renal tubule injury and oxidative stress indicate diabetic nephropathy before microalbuminuria. Diabetic nephropathy is a common complication of type 1 diabetes. Traditionally, measurement of microalbuminuria is used to screen children with diabetes for diabetic nephropathy. However, evidence suggests that damage to the kidneys may begin soon after diagnosis, much earlier than microalbuminuria can…

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Understanding Black Youth Suicide: Steps Toward Prevention
Understanding Black Youth Suicide: Steps Toward Prevention 1024 596 Abbie Roth

To understand the how and why of rising rates of Black youth suicide, researchers call for a ‘Ground Zero’ approach. In December 2019, the Congressional Black Caucus released the statement “Ring the Alarm: The Crisis of Black Youth Suicide in America.” The statement focused on rising suicide rates among Black youth in the United States.…

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Indicators of Blood Clot Potential Directly Relate to Nephrotic Syndrome Severity
Indicators of Blood Clot Potential Directly Relate to Nephrotic Syndrome Severity 150 150 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

Researchers in the NEPTUNE network and collaborators at Nationwide Children’s Hospital have confirmed their preclinical studies demonstrating a direct correlation between the severity of disease and prothrombotic biomarkers in patients with nephrotic syndrome. Nephrotic syndrome (NS) dramatically increases the risk of a life-threatening blood clot, but until recently, clinicians have had no reasonable biomarker to…

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Targeting DIPG: The Most Puzzling of Pediatric Brain Tumors
Targeting DIPG: The Most Puzzling of Pediatric Brain Tumors 772 447 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

Survival has dramatically improved for numerous pediatric cancers over the last several decades, with a notable and very deadly exception: diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG). Now, a community of researchers and clinician-scientists have set the stage for a renewed — and better-armed — assault against this beast of a brain tumor. The past 50 years…

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Lessons Learned Through a Global Pandemic
Lessons Learned Through a Global Pandemic 1024 683 Lauren Bakaletz, PhD
Lauren Bakaletz, PhD

As a microbiologist and vaccinologist, I spend nearly every day thinking about viruses and bacteria and the diseases they cause, as well as how to best prevent them from doing so. While in graduate school, we were taught about the great ‘flu’ pandemic of 1918 that infected one-third of the world’s population and killed 20-50…

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Lauren Bakaletz Named 2021 Allen Distinguished Scholar in Pediatric Research
Lauren Bakaletz Named 2021 Allen Distinguished Scholar in Pediatric Research 1024 575 Abbie Roth

Lauren Bakaletz, PhD, director of the Center for Microbial Pathogenesis in the Abigail Wexner Research Institute (AWRI) at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, was named the 2021 Allen Distinguished Scholar in Pediatric Research. The award is given in honor of former Nationwide Children’s CEO, Steve Allen, MD, and his role in growing the AWRI into a preeminent research institution.…

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Boosting Natural Killer Cells for the Treatment of COVID-19
Boosting Natural Killer Cells for the Treatment of COVID-19 150 150 Lauren Dembeck

Natural killer cells — critical for immune surveillance and host defense — have an important role in cancer immunotherapy and antiviral responses. While driving to the laboratory one day, Brian Tullius, MA, MD, a fourth-year bone marrow transplant and cell therapies fellow at Nationwide Children’s in the Lee Lab, had an epiphany. “I thought, ‘wait…

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Cerebral Organoids Provide Insight into Human Brain Development and Neurological Disease
Cerebral Organoids Provide Insight into Human Brain Development and Neurological Disease 1024 575 JoAnna Pendergrass, DVM
microscopic image of brain organoid

Correlations between the neuroelectrical maturation and cellular development of cerebral organoids highlight the organoids’ translational and therapeutical potential in early neurodevelopmental disorders. Cerebral organoids are three-dimensional miniature organs that resemble the human brain. Derived from human pluripotent stem cells, cerebral organoids have emerged to advance stem cell research, improve three-dimensional tissue culture techniques and enhance…

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Advances in Neonatal GERD
Advances in Neonatal GERD 1024 683 Mary Bates, PhD
Dr. Jadcherla

New studies from the Jadcherla Lab provide insights into diagnosing, classifying and treating GERD in infants. Differentiating gastroesophageal reflux (GER), which is defined as the passage of gastric contents into the esophagus, from GER disease (GERD), when reflux is associated with troubling symptoms, remains a challenge in infants. Symptom-based diagnosis and treatment of GERD has…

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Race Is a Risk Factor for Postoperative Death in Apparently Healthy Children in United States
Race Is a Risk Factor for Postoperative Death in Apparently Healthy Children in United States 1024 683 Abbie Roth

African American children were nearly 3.5 times more likely to die within 30 days after surgery, compared to white peers. In a new study, published in Pediatrics, researchers have shown that being African American was strongly associated with a higher risk of postoperative complications and mortality among apparently healthy children. In fact, compared to their white peers,…

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Clinical Trials for Blood Cancers: Advancing Options for Children and Young Adults
Clinical Trials for Blood Cancers: Advancing Options for Children and Young Adults 1024 683 Abbie Roth

Most cancer treatments are first discovered, developed and approved for adult patients. But translating those therapies to pediatric and young adult patients with cancers can be more of a winding path than a superhighway. At Nationwide Children’s Hospital, the Division of Hematology, Oncology and Blood and Marrow Transplant is dedicated to participating in and supporting clinical…

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Hemophilia Gene Therapy Trials Aim to Reduce Patient Burden
Hemophilia Gene Therapy Trials Aim to Reduce Patient Burden 1024 495 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES
blood cells

Clinical trials using gene therapy to boost the body’s production of clotting factor aim to remove the need for regular infusions — ideally giving patients years or even decades free from daily worry about their condition. Unlike most pediatric treatment centers, Nationwide Children’s Hospital is one of only a few dozen sites worldwide selected to…

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Study Finds Rising Rate of Mental Health Visits Among Youth to Emergency Departments
Study Finds Rising Rate of Mental Health Visits Among Youth to Emergency Departments 480 320 Kaitlin Hall

Highest jump was among 15- to 17-year-olds and more pronounced in girls; Dramatic increases in self-harm and substance use as reasons for ED visits. While the number of pediatric emergency department (ED) visits across the nation has remained stable over the last 10 years, visits for mental health disorders have risen 60% and the rate…

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Transforming Medical Science Through Research Affinity Groups
Transforming Medical Science Through Research Affinity Groups 150 150 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

Purposeful synergy drives the most meaningful medical science. Nephrology physician-scientists require tissue samples, urologists desire tests to know which patients truly require surgery, and basic scientists must find ways to meaningfully assess new animal models to yield clinically valuable data. If each of these professionals had a defined network of colleagues from the other disciplines…

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Epigenetics, Chromatin Architecture and a Judo Mechanism to Attack Cancer
Epigenetics, Chromatin Architecture and a Judo Mechanism to Attack Cancer 1024 575 Abbie Roth
yellow squiggly lines representing chromatin strands in the nucleus

Researchers broaden the understanding chromatin architecture in human disease. Epigenetics is the study of how genetic information is context-dependent: it is organized so it can be repressed, but also read, repaired and replicated. For example, transcription factors can “communicate” with each other through the chromatin-DNA interface, and work in combinations to regulate which genes are…

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Unlocking the Structure of Biofilms
Unlocking the Structure of Biofilms 1024 575 Kevin Mayhood
Illustration showing the precise pattern of a biofilm - a perfect, 3D matrix

Researchers characterize a component that stabilizes biofilms, a step toward learning ways to disrupt protection of harmful bacteria. In the extracellular DNA lattice of bacterial biofilms, nature appears to reprise the functional equivalent of Holliday junction (HJ) intermediates — cross-shaped structures formed during the process of genetic recombination, researchers at Nationwide Children’s Hospital report in Proceedings…

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Better Bone Healing by Reversing Current Techniques?
Better Bone Healing by Reversing Current Techniques? 1024 575 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

Bones may heal denser and stronger when given room for controlled micro-movement at first, followed by rigid stabilization — a complete flip-flop of the standard of care. A combination of biology and mechanical influence determines how well a bone heals, for better or worse. For half a century, physicians have believed that complete bone immobilization…

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