Mechanism of Bacterial Adhesion to Platelets Revealed
Mechanism of Bacterial Adhesion to Platelets Revealed 150 150 Tiasha Letostak, PhD

Researchers investigate a key protein required to bind two distinct receptors on the bacteria Streptococcus oralis involved in infective endocarditis. Infective endocarditis (IE) is an infection of the endocardium, usually of the valves, and is caused by infectious agents that are typically bacterial. Understanding…

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ANH Preserves Platelet Count and Function Regardless of Storage Method and Time
ANH Preserves Platelet Count and Function Regardless of Storage Method and Time 150 150 Kevin Mayhood

Length of storage during cardiac surgeries appears to have no detrimental effects on blood. Across the United States, transfusions are standard in cardiac operating rooms, but at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, a practice geared toward limiting blood transfusion has been established and finely honed. According…

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How a QI Project Dramatically Increased Pediatric Survival After Cardiopulmonary Arrest
How a QI Project Dramatically Increased Pediatric Survival After Cardiopulmonary Arrest 150 150 Jeb Phillips

A survival rate of 37-48 percent among young heart surgery patients who experience code events is the norm. A multidisciplinary review process helped achieve an 81 percent rate at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. Survival rates have remained stubbornly low for young heart surgery patients who…

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There’s No Place Like Home (Depending on Which State You Live In…..)
There’s No Place Like Home (Depending on Which State You Live In…..) 150 150 Kelly Kelleher, MD, MPH

Researchers find wide variation in how federal entitlement and benefit programs are implemented from state to state. Over the past five decades, the health of America’s children has improved considerably. Unfortunately, those improvements were not evenly distributed. Most American children are healthy and have…

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Two Investigational Antitumor Agents Work Better Together Against MPNST and Neuroblastoma
Two Investigational Antitumor Agents Work Better Together Against MPNST and Neuroblastoma 150 150 Abbie Miller

The synergistic effects of a kinase inhibitor and an oncolytic herpes virus show promise for difficult-to-treat neuroblastomas and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors. Two investigational agents, Aurora A kinase inhibitor (alisertib) and HSV1716, a virus derived from HSV-1 and attenuated by the deletion of…

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Evaluating and Treating Pediatric Lower Back Pain in the Primary Care Setting
Evaluating and Treating Pediatric Lower Back Pain in the Primary Care Setting 150 150 Jeb Phillips

While pediatric training often focuses on etiology, recent studies have found that most cases of lower back pain in school-aged children have no definitive diagnosis and are benign and self-limiting. Primary care pediatricians are often taught that lower back pain in school-aged children has…

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Hormonal Contraception Safer Than Expected For Women With Diabetes
Hormonal Contraception Safer Than Expected For Women With Diabetes 150 150 Abbie Miller

Women with diabetes often fall through the cracks when it comes to prescription contraception. A new study illuminates the issues and highlights safe options. The use of contraception to prevent unplanned pregnancies is an important aspect of women’s health. For women with chronic health…

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Subclinical Muscle Involvement May be Missed With Amyopathic Juvenile Dermatomyositis Diagnosis
Subclinical Muscle Involvement May be Missed With Amyopathic Juvenile Dermatomyositis Diagnosis 150 150 Abbie Miller

Study shows that some children diagnosed with amyopathic dermatomyositis have subclinical muscle involvement, highlighting the need for standardized workup and treatment protocols. Juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) is an autoimmune disease that classically presents in preschool to school aged children with a rash and muscle weakness. In…

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For AYA Females With Rhabdomyosarcoma, Consider Routine Examination or Imaging of Breasts
For AYA Females With Rhabdomyosarcoma, Consider Routine Examination or Imaging of Breasts 150 150 Abbie Miller

Rhabdomyosarcoma with breast involvement is found almost exclusively in females. A recent case series highlights the need for guidelines for follow-up imaging. Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is a soft tissue sarcoma associated with metastasis and inferior outcomes in adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients (those with…

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Hospitals Should Use Genotyping to Monitor Bacterial Infections
Hospitals Should Use Genotyping to Monitor Bacterial Infections 150 150 Kevin Mayhood

A team led by a pulmonologist-researcher found that in a children’s hospital, an unexpected pathogen emerges as a common cause of infection. The bacteria Acinetobacter baumannii is a widely-reported cause of healthcare-associated infections, particularly in adult intensive care units in developing countries. But a retrospective study…

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Why Patients With Diabetes Have More UTIs
Why Patients With Diabetes Have More UTIs 150 150 Mary Bates, PhD

Insulin regulates an antimicrobial peptide that is suppressed in patients with diabetes. A recent study led by clinicians and researchers at Nationwide Children’s Hospital reports a potential explanation for why urinary tract infections (UTIs) are so common in patients with diabetes – insulin regulates…

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Local Learning Health System Model Demonstrates High-Quality Patient Care While Reducing Costs
Local Learning Health System Model Demonstrates High-Quality Patient Care While Reducing Costs 150 150 Jan Arthur

Providing high-quality patient care while reducing costs is a significant goal in the current health care reform environment. The Institute of Medicine has specifically called for the establishment of “learning health systems” to address this challenge. In a learning health system, the electronic health…

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Many Respiratory Pathogens, One Test: The Respiratory Infection Array
Many Respiratory Pathogens, One Test: The Respiratory Infection Array 150 150 Jeb Phillips

A multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay newly available for outpatients is faster and more comprehensive than conventional testing for causes of upper respiratory infection. ‘Tis the season for coughs, runny noses and the challenge of trying to pinpoint which pathogen is causing your patient’s…

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Promising Practices and Patient-Centered Medical Neighborhoods for Childhood Obesity
Promising Practices and Patient-Centered Medical Neighborhoods for Childhood Obesity 150 150 Tiasha Letostak, PhD

An algorithm for assessment and management of childhood obesity, along with patient-centered medical neighborhoods, provides avenues for comprehensive weight management for children 2 years and older. Although childhood obesity affects 17 percent of children in the United States, and nearly one-quarter of these children…

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New App Enables Families and Researchers to Track Seizures With an Apple Watch
New App Enables Families and Researchers to Track Seizures With an Apple Watch 150 150 Gina Bericchia

Could a wearable app help children with seizures? With the launch of the Track It! app for Apple Watch, that’s what researchers at Nationwide Children’s Hospital are hoping to find out. Nationwide Children’s Hospital and SeizureTracker.com recently introduced a new wearable app to help track seizures…

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Should Melatonin Be Used To Treat Childhood Insomnia?
Should Melatonin Be Used To Treat Childhood Insomnia? 150 150 Mark Splaingard, MD

Mark L. Splaingard, MD, director of the Sleep Disorders Center at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, answers a question often asked by primary care providers. With some reports that insomnia symptoms are experienced by 20 percent or more of children, health care providers (and parents) often…

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Understanding Stress Experienced by Survivors of Congenital Heart Disease
Understanding Stress Experienced by Survivors of Congenital Heart Disease 150 150 Tiasha Letostak, PhD

For adolescent and adult survivors of congenital heart disease, how they perceive disease-related stress has a key connection to how they report health outcomes, such as quality of life and emotional well-being. Researchers at Nationwide Children’s Hospital are the first to systematically identify different…

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Two Genes Linked to Postpartum Immunity Revival in Women With Persistent Hepatitis C
Two Genes Linked to Postpartum Immunity Revival in Women With Persistent Hepatitis C 150 150 Kevin Mayhood

Research may provide a model for identifying immune factors needed to control chronic infections. Alternative forms of two genes are associated with a boost in immunity to hepatitis C after childbirth, a study led by a Nationwide Children’s Hospital physician-researcher shows. At three months…

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How to Reduce Necrotizing Enterocolitis in the NICU
How to Reduce Necrotizing Enterocolitis in the NICU 150 150 Jeb Phillips

A QI project with simple, inexpensive interventions significantly lowered the NEC rate in one of the country’s largest neonatal units. In 2011, a quality improvement team at Nationwide Children’s Hospital developed a short list of simple, economical strategies to limit necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), one…

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What Do Space Rocks Have to Do With Preterm Birth?
What Do Space Rocks Have to Do With Preterm Birth? 150 150 Abbie Miller

A brief history of nanobacteria and their implications for human health. I remember when nanobacteria were a really big deal. Press-conference-by-POTUS-about-evidence-of-extraterrestrial-life-level big deal. I hadn’t thought much about them until recently, when they made a surprise appearance in a presentation on idiopathic preterm birth by Irina…

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New Study Points to a Possible Cause of Many Preterm Births
New Study Points to a Possible Cause of Many Preterm Births 150 150 Jeb Phillips

The discovery that small calcium deposits in fetal membranes may lead to a mother’s water breaking prematurely suggests that dietary or other interventions could prevent those preterm births. Most spontaneous preterm births do not have causes that are easy to identify. Physicians frequently have…

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Should Hormone Therapy be Considered for Inappropriate Sexual Behavior in Adolescents With Autism Spectrum Disorder?
Should Hormone Therapy be Considered for Inappropriate Sexual Behavior in Adolescents With Autism Spectrum Disorder? 150 150 Jeb Phillips

Families worry when children with autism spectrum disorder display inappropriate sexual behaviors, but specialists say hormonal suppression should not be the first-line approach. Leena Nahata, MD, a pediatric endocrinologist at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, has seen this kind of case in her own practice, so she suspects…

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Stronger Together: A Multi-institutional Database Is Connecting Down Syndrome Clinics for Better Outcomes
Stronger Together: A Multi-institutional Database Is Connecting Down Syndrome Clinics for Better Outcomes 1024 575 Stephanie Santoro, MD

Due to medical advances, people with Down syndrome are living longer than ever before. This increased life expectancy has nearly doubled in the past 25 years. The National Down Syndrome Society estimates that 400,000 people with Down syndrome are living in the United States.…

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From Military Zones to Pediatric Trauma Centers, Implementing Massive Transfusion Protocols
From Military Zones to Pediatric Trauma Centers, Implementing Massive Transfusion Protocols 150 150 Abbie Miller

While military and adult research has shown massive transfusion protocols to be lifesaving, implementation and validation in pediatrics lags. When someone is critically injured with life-threatening bleeding, the primary objective of the care team is to stop the bleeding and replace the lost blood.…

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Pediatricians and Subspecialists May Need to Up Their ADHD Game
Pediatricians and Subspecialists May Need to Up Their ADHD Game 150 150 Kevin Mayhood

From sixth to eighth grade, Stacy Gibson sought out kids he knew had attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and bought their Ritalin or Adderall, sometimes by the handful. “I would party all night,then I’d take the pills to get through class. It gave me a rush of…

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Solving the Problem of Managing Big Genomic Data
Solving the Problem of Managing Big Genomic Data 150 150 Abbie Miller

Researchers at Nationwide Children’s Hospital complete a first-of-its-kind project to evaluate a large-scale genomic data management system on the scale of up to one million genomes. The influx of genomics data resulting from the increasing affordability of whole exome/genome sequencing and President Obama’s Precision…

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Diagnosing GERD in Neonates? Be Cautious
Diagnosing GERD in Neonates? Be Cautious 150 150 Jeb Phillips

Gastroesophageal reflux disease is likely over-diagnosed in neonates, leading to unnecessary and harmful treatment. Approximately 10 percent of infants born preterm in the United States are diagnosed with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). But it’s almost certain that not all of those babies actually have GERD, say…

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A New Use for Kangaroo Care
A New Use for Kangaroo Care 150 150 Kevin Mayhood

A parent’s touch reduces agitation, allows infants and toddlers to remain extubated after heart surgery. A small percentage of babies and young children who have undergone congenital cardiac surgery and early tracheal extubation are treated with a calming parent’s touch at Nationwide Children’s Hospital…

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How Can We Increase the HPV Vaccination Rate?
How Can We Increase the HPV Vaccination Rate? 150 150 Michael T. Brady, MD

Cancer is a terrifying diagnosis for a patient to receive or a doctor to give. So it would make sense that a vaccine proven to prevent cancer would be welcomed by everyone. The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine could prevent 28,500 HPV-related cancer cases – cervical, vaginal,…

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How to Integrate Genomics into Clinical Practice
How to Integrate Genomics into Clinical Practice 150 150 Abbie Miller

Recommendations from the Clinical Genetics Think Tank outline five key areas of focus for bringing genome and exome sequencing into the clinic. Clinical genome and exome sequencing (CGES) as a diagnostic tool is altering practice for clinical geneticists, genetic counselors and other clinical specialists.…

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In Sight: Two Stage Surgery for Epilepsy
In Sight: Two Stage Surgery for Epilepsy 150 150 Abbie Miller

Surgery proves to be a viable option for patients with medically refractory epilepsy. Childhood onset epilepsy affects 1 percent of children worldwide. About 25 to 30 percent of these patients will have medically refractory epilepsy, continuing to have seizures despite using two or more antiseizure medications.…

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Great Minds Aren’t Thinking Alike About Asthma Care
Great Minds Aren’t Thinking Alike About Asthma Care 150 150 Brianne Moore

A recent audit of the Pediatric Hospital Information System using template matching finds wide variation in care provided to pediatric asthma patients. While asthma is a common and manageable disease, nine people still die from asthma each day. It is well known that asthma…

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One Dose Probiotic Biofilm Protects Against NEC
One Dose Probiotic Biofilm Protects Against NEC 150 150 Kevin Mayhood

Probiotic biofilm enables the beneficial bacteria to withstand stomach acid, promote microbial activity and decrease intestinal inflammation. A single dose of a probiotic biofilm grown on microspheres prevented or significantly reduced the severity of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in animal models of the disease, researchers…

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Novel Practice Pathway Addresses Problem Behaviors Among Patients With Autism
Novel Practice Pathway Addresses Problem Behaviors Among Patients With Autism 150 150 Kevin Mayhood

Pediatricians urged to investigate underlying causes. Issues causing children with autism spectrum disorder to be irritable or belligerent can be difficult for parents, teachers and other care providers to uncover. And, wait times to see a specialist may leave a child frustrated, distressed or…

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How Can You Optimize Care for Homeless Patients?
How Can You Optimize Care for Homeless Patients? 150 150 Tiasha Letostak, PhD

A recent policy statement from the AAP describes how pediatricians can help improve the health and well-being of homeless children in America. As of 2014, the National Center on Family Homelessness reported that a staggering 2.5 million children are homeless each year in America, a historic…

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New Guidelines Better Diagnose Common GI Disorders
New Guidelines Better Diagnose Common GI Disorders 150 150 Jeb Phillips

The new Rome IV criteria offer guidance to common but often misunderstood conditions. Because there are no clear causes of functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs), diagnosis and treatment can be difficult. Some physicians and parents may doubt the disorders exist at all, although pediatric gastroenterologists…

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A Better Approach to Prescribing Medication
A Better Approach to Prescribing Medication 150 150 Jeb Phillips

A small change in the way a doctor prescribes a medication can make a big difference. Officials from the accountable care organization Partners For Kids use this example all the time: Abilify, a behavioral health drug, is usually priced per pill, not by strength of…

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Best Practices for Research Recruitment and Retention
Best Practices for Research Recruitment and Retention 1024 575 Tiasha Letostak, PhD

You can’t obtain study data without participants. From initial design and promotion to communication tactics and patient satisfaction, here are some strategies to ensure success. Advancing pediatric research depends on successful recruitment and retention of study participants. Unfortunately, 9 out of 10 trials end…

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Childhood Kidney Stones: Their Surprising Connection to Future Disease
Childhood Kidney Stones: Their Surprising Connection to Future Disease 150 150 Jeb Phillips

Once thought to be an adult condition, urinary stone disease is increasingly found in children – and may be related to the development of cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney disease and low bone density. By one well-regarded estimate, the risk of developing urinary stone disease…

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Harnessing the Immune System: Has the Cure for Cancer Been Within Us All Along?
Harnessing the Immune System: Has the Cure for Cancer Been Within Us All Along? 1024 575 Abbie Miller

By learning to manipulate the immune system to target cancer cells, clinician-scientists are ushering in a new era in cancer treatments. The advances in cancer immunotherapy have been headline-making, and some clinical studies have produced stories of near-miraculous recoveries. From the immunotherapy drug credited…

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Changing the Game: Virtual Reality Distracts From Pain, Transforming the Patient Experience
Changing the Game: Virtual Reality Distracts From Pain, Transforming the Patient Experience 844 487 Gina Bericchia

A first-of-its-kind virtual reality experience from the hemophilia team and design experts at Nationwide Children’s Hospital and The Ohio State University distracts patients with an immersive environment of penguins, pirates and hermit crabs during infusions and other procedures. A pilot study is testing the…

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Minimally-Invasive Technology Proving Itself in Epilepsy Procedures
Minimally-Invasive Technology Proving Itself in Epilepsy Procedures 150 150 Kevin Mayhood

MRI-guided stereotactic laser ablation may become the option of choice for appropriate patients. MRI-guided stereotactic laser ablation is proving comparable to open surgery in several procedures aimed at controlling epilepsy, researchers report. Importantly, patients’ recovery is considerably easier and shorter than recuperation from traditional…

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Use Caution When Prescribing a Gluten-Free Diet
Use Caution When Prescribing a Gluten-Free Diet 150 150 Kevin Mayhood

A gluten-free diet makes diagnosing underlying conditions difficult and can leave potential, long-term consequences unaddressed. The growing popularity of a gluten-free diet among adults appears to be spilling over to children, with help from the pediatrician’s office. “An increasing number of primary care physicians,…

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Oligodendrocytes Induce Motor Neuron Death in ALS
Oligodendrocytes Induce Motor Neuron Death in ALS 150 150 Jeb Phillips

A first-of-its-kind oligodendrocyte in vitro model shows that human cells normally supportive of motor neuron function play an active role in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis pathogenesis – and this discovery may point the way toward therapeutic timing and targets. A number of studies over the…

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Personal, Familial and Social Factors Surrounding Child Suicide
Personal, Familial and Social Factors Surrounding Child Suicide 150 150 Brianne Moore

As suicide rates among children climb, researchers publish the first study exclusively focused on the precipitating circumstances of children and young adolescents who die by suicide. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), suicide was the 10th leading cause of death for…

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A Painful Reality: Care Providers Tend to Underestimate Pain During Pediatric Burn Dressing Changes
A Painful Reality: Care Providers Tend to Underestimate Pain During Pediatric Burn Dressing Changes 150 150 Krista Wheeler

Researchers call for an updated pain scale. Dressing changes have been identified as one of the major contributors to perceived pain during burn care, and so it is important that pain be assessed accurately. But a new study from the Center for Pediatric Trauma Research in…

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What Pediatricians Need to Know About the New Meningococcal B Vaccine
What Pediatricians Need to Know About the New Meningococcal B Vaccine 150 150 Michael T. Brady, MD

Michael T. Brady, MD, infectious diseases specialist at Nationwide Children’s Hospital and primary author of the recent American Academy of Pediatrics position paper on the meningococcal B vaccine, shares what you need to know about this controversial vaccine. Meningococcal serotype B (MenB) causes the…

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Nine Factors for Predicting the Duration of Post-Concussion Symptoms
Nine Factors for Predicting the Duration of Post-Concussion Symptoms 150 150 Jeb Phillips

Concussion recovery is poorly understood, but new research suggests that some factors are predictive of recovery time. Several factors, including continued physical activity following a concussion, worsening symptoms from the time of injury to the time a patient seeks care, and a previous history…

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Finding a Better Way to Diagnose and Treat Iron Deficiency in Young Women
Finding a Better Way to Diagnose and Treat Iron Deficiency in Young Women 150 150 Brianne Moore

Iron deficiency without anemia often goes undiagnosed in young women, and when caught, the standard treatment is often associated with poor compliance due to side effects. Dr. Sarah O’Brien’s research is focused on finding a solution. Even in developed countries, iron deficiency continues to…

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Specialized Test Detects Bacterial Infections in Youngest Infants with Fever
Specialized Test Detects Bacterial Infections in Youngest Infants with Fever 150 150 Tiasha Letostak, PhD

The diagnostic test has potential to prevent painful testing, unnecessary antibiotics and hospitalizations for many of the more than 500,000 febrile infants who arrive at hospitals each year. Physicians from Children’s Hospital of Michigan, UC Davis Medical Center and Nationwide Children’s Hospital, in collaboration…

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Using Whole Exome Sequencing to Find Genetic Cause of Congenital Heart Disease in At-Risk Patients
Using Whole Exome Sequencing to Find Genetic Cause of Congenital Heart Disease in At-Risk Patients 150 150 Brianne Moore

Whole exome sequencing has the ability to identify disease-causing mutations, contributing to the development of personalized medicine and bridging a crucial gap between scientific knowledge and clinical application. Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common type of birth defect, affecting approximately 40,000 births…

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Study Finds Genetic Loci Associated With Anxiety and Aggression in Dogs: What Does It Mean for Kids?
Study Finds Genetic Loci Associated With Anxiety and Aggression in Dogs: What Does It Mean for Kids? 150 150 Carlos E. Alvarez, PhD

Principal investigator Carlos Alvarez, PhD, reports the genome wide mapping of nine fear and aggression traits in dogs and discusses the implications of the findings. Anxiety disorders are the most common type of mental illness in the United States. They are associated with increased…

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Chromatin’s Role in Cancer Development
Chromatin’s Role in Cancer Development 150 150 Tiasha Letostak, PhD

A new study investigates the role of chromatin containing the histone H3 variant in the centromere region of chromosomes in the development of cancer. Although there are many types of cancer, all cancers have one thing in common: they develop when normal processes in…

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Researchers at Nationwide Children’s Hospital Describe New Type of Cancer Therapy
Researchers at Nationwide Children’s Hospital Describe New Type of Cancer Therapy 150 150 Abbie Miller

The new chemotherapy is effective against both pediatric and adult cancers, and it allows other chemotherapies to more readily reach their targets. A study conducted at Nationwide Children’s Hospital has found that a new chemotherapy is effective against both pediatric and adult cancers, and…

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Considering Peptide Tuning of Natural Killer (NK) Cells
Considering Peptide Tuning of Natural Killer (NK) Cells 150 150 Abbie Miller

Researchers combine modeling and functional studies of interactions between MHC-I and NK cells to learn how they operate on a molecular level. Natural killer (NK) cells are cytotoxic lymphocytes — important immune cells of the innate immune system. NK cells are increasingly understood to…

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An Effective Strategy for Disrupting Bacterial Biofilms
An Effective Strategy for Disrupting Bacterial Biofilms 150 150 Tiasha Letostak, PhD

Using monoclonal antibodies to bind to proteins essential to biofilm structure and stability is highly effective against many types of bacteria that cause a variety of human disease. Biofilms are communities of bacteria that adhere to a surface and are nearly impossible to eradicate…

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When Should Kids With Severe Functional Constipation Have Surgery?
When Should Kids With Severe Functional Constipation Have Surgery? 150 150 Jeb Phillips

A protocol developed by pediatric surgeons and gastroenterologists allows patients to receive specific surgical interventions that will be most beneficial – and allows many patients originally referred for surgery to avoid it altogether. Children with severe functional constipation are most often referred for surgery…

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Counseling Pediatric Patients on Fertility and Sexual Function
Counseling Pediatric Patients on Fertility and Sexual Function 150 150 Brianne Moore

How should we talk to patients and their families about these sensitive subjects? Since 2006, several medical societies have released guidelines for discussing fertility preservation prior to pediatric cancer treatment. According to the American Society for Reproductive Medicine, a “collaborative, multidisciplinary team approach” is…

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Often-Unreported MRI Finding May Indicate Neurodevelopmental Impairment in Premature Infants
Often-Unreported MRI Finding May Indicate Neurodevelopmental Impairment in Premature Infants 150 150 Jeb Phillips

Moderate-to-severe gyral maturation delay emerged as a significant predictor of overall neurodevelopmental delay in premature infants with extremely low birth weights Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain is increasingly used to predict neurodevelopmental outcomes in premature infants, but the existing systems of scoring those…

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For Infants Born Very Preterm, Transcatheter Device Closure of Patent Ductus Arteriosus is Feasible
For Infants Born Very Preterm, Transcatheter Device Closure of Patent Ductus Arteriosus is Feasible 150 150 Jeb Phillips

Optimal timing of procedures and reduction of adverse events are avenues for future study. Approximately half of babies born at less than 32 weeks of gestational age have persistent patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), a condition associated with higher odds of death and respiratory morbidity.…

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Specialty Pharmacy for Cystic Fibrosis Improves Access to Medication
Specialty Pharmacy for Cystic Fibrosis Improves Access to Medication 150 150 Abbie Miller

In a project started to increase the number of patients taking Orkambi®, access and adherence increases for all medications. The Nationwide Children’s Hospital Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Program cares for a large population of patients of all ages with cystic fibrosis.  The program has participated in many…

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conceptual art of DNA
How Does Genomic Medicine Become a Reality for Children’s Health?
How Does Genomic Medicine Become a Reality for Children’s Health? 1024 575 Jan Arthur

Perhaps one of the most important initiatives to advance our understanding of pediatric disease is genomic analysis. Genomics encompasses all aspects of understanding the human genetic code, especially how genetic information contained in every human cell can be interpreted to prevent disease and customize…

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A Novel, Promising Strategy for Diagnosing UTIs in Children
A Novel, Promising Strategy for Diagnosing UTIs in Children 150 150 Tiasha Letostak, PhD

Antimicrobial peptides may be effective biomarkers for diagnosing urinary tract infections in children. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most common infections in children and account for millions of unplanned pediatrician and urgent care visits each year in the United States. Previous…

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Long Acting Reversible Contraceptives: A First-Line Approach to Prevent Teen Pregnancy
Long Acting Reversible Contraceptives: A First-Line Approach to Prevent Teen Pregnancy 150 150 Elise Berlan, MD, MPH

Unplanned teen pregnancies remain a problem in American society. In the United States, 82 percent of teen pregnancies are unplanned, and the United States has the highest teenage pregnancy rate among high income nations. Despite being highly effective and safe, misconceptions around long acting…

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Despite Safety Concerns, Nearly 1 in 4 Babies in the NICU Receive Acid Suppressing Medications
Despite Safety Concerns, Nearly 1 in 4 Babies in the NICU Receive Acid Suppressing Medications 150 150 Jeb Phillips

While use is dropping overall as doctors heed warnings, acid suppressing medication originally formulated for older children and adults is still being given to nearly 25 percent of babies in the NICU. Since 2006, several published studies have associated the use of some acid…

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Uncovering Racial Disparities in Down Syndrome
Uncovering Racial Disparities in Down Syndrome 1024 575 Stephanie Santoro, MD

Life expectancy for people with Down syndrome varies depending on race, but why? An estimated 6000 infants with Down syndrome (DS) are born in the United States annually, making it the most common liveborn trisomy and chromosomal condition.[1] And a significant increase in overall…

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First Implantable Hemodynamic Monitoring Device in Single Ventricle Fontan Anatomy
First Implantable Hemodynamic Monitoring Device in Single Ventricle Fontan Anatomy 150 150 Abbie Miller

The first IHM in a patient with Fontan anatomy and physiology enables real-time monitoring of central venous and pulmonary artery pressures. While the Fontan procedure has improved the short- and mid-term outcomes for patients born with single ventricle anatomy, long-term complications of Fontan circulation…

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Creating the Patient-Centered Medical Neighborhood
Creating the Patient-Centered Medical Neighborhood 1024 575 Tiasha Letostak, PhD

How do we create a more integrated healthcare delivery system to improve outcomes in our community? The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) conceptualizes the medical neighborhood as a patient-centered medical home (PCMH) and the network of other clinicians providing health care services to patients…

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Using Social Media to Advance Care
Using Social Media to Advance Care 150 150 Nationwide Children's

As the use of social media has grown, so has the medical community’s understanding of how it can be harnessed for health care. From collaborating with peers and educating the public to building your career, physicians have a growing responsibility and growing presence in…

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conceptual art of DNA
Achieving CLARITY
Achieving CLARITY 1024 575 Abbie Miller

Multidisciplinary team from Nationwide Children’s wins international genomics competition. Accurate, patient-centered, comprehensive. That’s how the judges and leaders of the CLARITY Undiagnosed Challenge described the work of a team from Nationwide Children’s Hospital. Those same words could be used to describe the highly motivated and diverse team who surprised themselves by winning…

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Simulating Surgery With High-Performance Computing
Simulating Surgery With High-Performance Computing 1024 575 Abbie Miller

By applying high-performance computing to the field of otolaryngology, a team of researchers is developing a simulation environment for teaching surgical techniques related to the temporal bone. The purpose of training — whether a fire drill or practicing a surgical technique — is to…

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Neurologists Urged to Consider MCA When Evaluations Don’t Support Claims
Neurologists Urged to Consider MCA When Evaluations Don’t Support Claims 150 150 Kevin Mayhood

Up to half of medical child abuse cases include neurological symptoms Medical child abuse (MCA) is highly variable, but neurologists are in a position to help detect up to half of these cases, researchers at Nationwide Children’s Hospital report. Consistent with the authors’ clinical…

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Black and white photo of infant crying in hospital
The Smallest Victims of the Opioid Crisis
The Smallest Victims of the Opioid Crisis 1024 575 Abbie Miller

Research, protocols and community connections lead to help infants with neonatal abstinence syndrome and their mothers. It’s a sound you’d never forget. The panicked, high-pitched cry of a newborn withdrawing from the drugs his mother took. All the sensations that drive an addict to…

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Signaling Pathway Changes May Flag CAVD, Offer Target for Therapies
Signaling Pathway Changes May Flag CAVD, Offer Target for Therapies 150 150 Kevin Mayhood

Loss of TgfB1 from the endothelium leads to a reduction in Sox9 expression and valve calcification. A team of researchers has identified a molecular signaling pathway that, when altered, can contribute to calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD). The finding may provide a method for early diagnosis — many…

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Helping the Sickest Children Navigate the Health Care System
Helping the Sickest Children Navigate the Health Care System 150 150 Jeb Phillips

Care coordination focuses on better outcomes for children with medical complexity. Consider a child with cerebral palsy who needs a feeding tube to eat. She has special equipment for a basic life function. She requires regular visits with a primary care physician and specialists in neurology, orthopedics and…

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Predicting Risk for Chronic Renal Disease in Children
Predicting Risk for Chronic Renal Disease in Children 150 150 Kevin Mayhood

Studies using a new contrast agent have the potential to determine if infants born premature develop a full complement of nephrons. A new magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent enables researchers to see the number and volume of blood-filtering nephrons in rodent kidneys and donated human adult kidneys,…

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The Journey to a Program Project Grant
The Journey to a Program Project Grant 1024 575 Tiasha Letostak, PhD

Recommendations from a multi-institutional research team who persevered to obtain a P01 to develop a vaccine for RSV. In 2015, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) awarded a $6.75 million program project grant to Mark Peeples, PhD, Octavio Ramilo, MD, and M. Asuncion Mejias, MD, PhD, all principal investigators in the…

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Vaccine Fails to Reactivate Immunity to Hepatitis C Virus
Vaccine Fails to Reactivate Immunity to Hepatitis C Virus 150 150 Abbie Miller

T cells remain inactivated even after immunization in subjects with persistent, controlled infections. Two papers recently published in Hepatology uncovered evidence of permanent immune system damage after hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. The studies used a vaccine currently in clinical trials to attempt to restore immunity against HCV in…

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A Novel Approach to Pediatric Fecal and Urinary Incontinence
A Novel Approach to Pediatric Fecal and Urinary Incontinence 150 150 Jeb Phillips

A 9-year-old girl with caudal regression syndrome is the first child in the United States to be treated with pudendal nerve stimulation. Neuromodulation of the sacral nerve, or sacral nerve stimulation, is rarely but increasingly used in children to help control fecal and urinary incontinence when standard…

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On the Front Lines
On the Front Lines 150 150 Anne FitzSimons

Pediatricians can reverse health disparities among the LGBT population. A recent position paper from the American College of Physicians (ACP) examines health disparities experienced by the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) population in the United States and includes recommendations for improving access to care. The ACP found…

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Illustration showing the precise pattern of a biofilm - a perfect, 3D matrix
The Collapse of Biofilms?
The Collapse of Biofilms? 1024 575 Jeb Phillips

Scientists are working to eliminate the causes of countless chronic and recurrent human infections. Before the discoveries that could lead to biofilm eradication, before the idea that he was even working on treatments for the bacterial communities that are crucial to most human infections, Steven Goodman, PhD, had a mystery on…

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open bottle of pills
Taking Aim at the Opioid Problem
Taking Aim at the Opioid Problem 1024 683 Abbie Miller

Pediatric specialists offer practical advice for protecting vulnerable patients from a growing epidemic. The opioid epidemic in the United States is so widespread that even parents and teachers are now being issued opioid overdose kits complete with naloxone. It’s in rural communities, suburban neighborhoods and inner cities. It’s…

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Remote Control Treatment
Remote Control Treatment 1024 575 Jeb Phillips

Magnetic growing rods help patients who have early-onset scoliosis avoid repeated surgeries. A common surgical treatment for young children with severe early-onset scoliosis is the implantation of growing rods or expandable titanium ribs. The devices are lengthened as the child grows, helping to straighten the spine. Lengthening involves…

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Hearing Without Cochlear Nerves
Hearing Without Cochlear Nerves 150 150 Tiasha Letostak, PhD

Auditory brainstem implant devices may help young children with sensorineural hearing loss. Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) is the most common type of hearing loss, accounting for about 90 percent of all hearing loss worldwide. SNHL involves damage to the inner ear (cochlea) or to the nerve pathways from…

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Identifying Characteristics Associated With Timely Follow-Up Psychiatric Care
Identifying Characteristics Associated With Timely Follow-Up Psychiatric Care 150 150 Kevin Mayhood

Nearly one in three youths with mood disorders receive no outpatient care within 30 days of psychiatric hospital discharge. More than diagnoses and demographics influence whether youths receive critical outpatient care following psychiatric hospitalization. Individual attributes and aspects of the hospital where they receive treatment as well as…

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Weaning Babies with NAS Better and Faster
Weaning Babies with NAS Better and Faster 150 150 Kevin Mayhood

Protocol enables babies born addicted to opioids to be weaned off the drugs faster. Adoption of a strict protocol has enabled six regional perinatal centers across Ohio to wean babies exposed to opioids in utero off drugs faster, send them home sooner and lower the use…

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How to Increase Adherence to Screening Guidelines for Children With Down Syndrome
How to Increase Adherence to Screening Guidelines for Children With Down Syndrome 150 150 Abbie Miller

Recent study shows that while most families and physicians support the guidelines, patients are not receiving the recommended screenings. Children with Down syndrome have multiple medical conditions and cognitive impairments related to the additional genetic material from chromosome 21. Because of common comorbid conditions…

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Researchers Find Signatures of Rhinovirus Infection and Incidental Presence
Researchers Find Signatures of Rhinovirus Infection and Incidental Presence 150 150 Kevin Mayhood

Transcriptional profiling may speed discrimination between the two, aiding in clinical decisions. Transcriptional profiling, measuring the activity of thousands of genes at once to create a snapshot of cellular function, may make quick work of discriminating between active rhinovirus infection and incidental virus detection…

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New Approach to Gathering Protein Signatures
New Approach to Gathering Protein Signatures 150 150 Abbie Miller

In the first comprehensive study of its kind, researchers simultaneously analyzed both host and bacteria protein signatures from a single, tiny tissue sample. A novel study from researchers at Nationwide Children’s Hospital has shown that it is possible to obtain both host and bacteria…

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Loss of MHCI in Motor Neurons Leads to ALS Astrocyte Toxicity
Loss of MHCI in Motor Neurons Leads to ALS Astrocyte Toxicity 150 150 Abbie Miller

New research shines a light on the role of MHCI in astrocyte-induced death of motor neurons in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and pointing to a potential therapeutic target. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, is a devastating progressive neurodegenerative disease that…

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Eating Better, Not Less, May Be Key to Weight Management for Teens on DMPA
Eating Better, Not Less, May Be Key to Weight Management for Teens on DMPA 150 150 Anne FitzSimons

Research suggests teens weight gain on popular injectable contraceptive associated with micronutrient intake. Each year, thousands of teenage girls decide to use the injectable contraceptive depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA). They are drawn to DMPA’s long-acting convenience (it’s injected just four times a year) and…

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Pay-for-Performance Incentives Impact Patient Care
Pay-for-Performance Incentives Impact Patient Care 150 150 Naomi Makni, MHA

First evaluation of pay-for-performance conducted by researchers at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. The first pay-for-performance (P4P) evaluation of pediatricians under a full-risk Medicaid accountable care organization (ACO) for children shows P4P incentives were partially responsible for higher performance on quality measures across Partners For Kids’ primary care…

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Involving Stakeholders Boosts Clinical Trial Participation
Involving Stakeholders Boosts Clinical Trial Participation 150 150 Alayna DiMartini

Stakeholder involvement in clinical trial design leads to greater recruitment and retention rates. By seeking the advice of patients, families and other stakeholders in designing a clinical trial investigating pediatric appendicitis, researchers at Nationwide Children’s Hospital found a way to significantly increase the number…

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Predicting the Efficacy of Immune-Based Therapies for Pediatric Solid Tumors
Predicting the Efficacy of Immune-Based Therapies for Pediatric Solid Tumors 150 150 Jeb Phillips

Expression of HLA class I and β-2-microglobulin may show how susceptible some cancers are to T-cell based immunotherapies. A number of possible immunotherapies for cancer are based on T-cells that can target and kill tumors. These cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) can only recognize tumor…

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Adenovirus or Kawasaki Disease?
Adenovirus or Kawasaki Disease? 150 150 Tiasha Letostak, PhD

Researchers investigate clinical and laboratory testing methods to accurately distinguish adenovirus from Kawasaki disease in children Kawasaki disease is a rare but serious condition in children that involves inflammation of the blood vessels, specifically the coronary arteries. It is the most common cause of pediatric…

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Appalachian and Urban Children Face Similar Health Care Challenges
Appalachian and Urban Children Face Similar Health Care Challenges 150 150 Katelyn Hanzel

Research shows children in Ohio’s Appalachian counties face similar health care challenges to those in metropolitan areas Despite the fact that previous research shows the Appalachian region of the United States as limited in access to health care services, researchers at Nationwide Children’s Hospital…

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