Pediatric Obesity Can Be Treated Safely and Effectively
Pediatric Obesity Can Be Treated Safely and Effectively 1024 575 Abbie Miller

New guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics emphasize evidence for safe, effective treatment of pediatric obesity for long-term benefit of children and adolescents.   More than 14.4 million U.S. children and adolescents have obesity, making it one of the most common chronic conditions…

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Addressing the Clinical Challenges of Caring for Children with Cystic Fibrosis and Autism Spectrum Disorder
Addressing the Clinical Challenges of Caring for Children with Cystic Fibrosis and Autism Spectrum Disorder 150 150 JoAnna Pendergrass, DVM

A recent study sheds light on the unique clinical challenges faced by children with cystic fibrosis and autism spectrum disorder and offers potential solutions to these challenges.   Cystic fibrosis (CF) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) pose significant clinical and emotional burdens to patients and…

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5 Things Neonatologists Should Know About Vitamin K Deficiency
5 Things Neonatologists Should Know About Vitamin K Deficiency 1024 683 Mary Bates, PhD

Vitamin K prophylaxis is safe and effective. Why are more parents refusing it, and what can be done? In a new perspective paper in the Journal of Perinatology, researchers from Nationwide Children’s say that vitamin K prophylaxis is an essential component of newborn care…

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Proteins as Antibiotic Alternatives for Urinary Tract Infections
Proteins as Antibiotic Alternatives for Urinary Tract Infections 1024 682 Emily Siebenmorgen

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria have made treating common infections challenging. In a new study from Nationwide Children’s Hospital, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science (PNAS), researchers demonstrate a way to boost the body’s production of antimicrobial peptides, which may provide an alternative to antibiotic…

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Cancer-Causing Gene and Treatment Target for Ultra-Rare Rhabdomyosarcoma Confirmed Via Multiple Models
Cancer-Causing Gene and Treatment Target for Ultra-Rare Rhabdomyosarcoma Confirmed Via Multiple Models 1024 764 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

An international team has validated a cancer-causing gene fusion — and therapeutic targets — for an unusual presentation of muscle cancer in infants. In 2016, researchers first identified a novel gene mutation and fusion in rare cases of infants with rhabdomyosarcoma, a type of…

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The Role of a Children’s Hospital in Central Ohio’s Biotech Boom
The Role of a Children’s Hospital in Central Ohio’s Biotech Boom 480 346 Lauren Dembeck and Natalie Wilson

Nationwide Children’s Hospital is at the front of the pack among top National Institutes of Health (NIH) funded children’s hospitals when it comes to developing novel gene therapies and commercializing intellectual property. Achieving this level of commercial activity is a testament to the organization’s…

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Re-evaluating GI Medication Regimens in People With Cystic Fibrosis
Re-evaluating GI Medication Regimens in People With Cystic Fibrosis 1024 681 Emily Siebenmorgen

After widespread adoption of highly effective modulator therapy (HEMT), a new study evaluated the GI medication regimens of people with cystic fibrosis (CF). The study, published in Pediatric Pulmonolgy, found patient-initiated decreases in dosing and withdrawal from common GI medications is already occurring, yet…

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Understanding the Cellular Mechanisms to Drive New Therapies for Neurodevelopmental Disorder with Regression, Abnormal Movements, Loss of Speech and Seizures (NEDAMSS)
Understanding the Cellular Mechanisms to Drive New Therapies for Neurodevelopmental Disorder with Regression, Abnormal Movements, Loss of Speech and Seizures (NEDAMSS) 1024 577 Jessica Nye, PhD

Derived cells from patients with NEDAMSS exhibit perturbed cellular respiration and poor neuronal survival, both of which can be improved with CuATSM treatment. NEDAMSS (neurodevelopmental disorder with regression, abnormal movements, loss of speech, and seizures) is a rare neurological disorder discovered in 2018 with…

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The PROMISE Program Reduces Cardiac Arrests in High-Risk Patients
The PROMISE Program Reduces Cardiac Arrests in High-Risk Patients 600 400 Mary Bates, PhD

This proactive quality improvement initiative improved outcomes for high-risk pediatric cardiology patients undergoing cardiac intervention. Faculty within The Heart Center at Nationwide Children’s recently initiated proactive risk mitigation strategies to reduce post-procedural cardiac arrests in high-risk congenital heart patients. In a new paper, the…

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Using 3D Motion Capture Technology to Improve Outcomes
Using 3D Motion Capture Technology to Improve Outcomes 150 150 Mary Bates, PhD

  Kirsten Tulchin-Francis, PhD Kirsten Tulchin-Francis, PhD, joined Nationwide Children’s in March 2022 as director of orthopedic research and director of the Honda Center for Gait Analysis and Mobility Enhancement. In a Q&A, she discusses how she uses motion capture technology to improve outcomes…

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teen boy with back to camera reading a book
Youth Suicide Rates in the U.S. Increased During the COVID-19 Pandemic, Especially Among Particular Subgroups
Youth Suicide Rates in the U.S. Increased During the COVID-19 Pandemic, Especially Among Particular Subgroups 1024 691 Jessica Nye, PhD

In the United States, youth suicides increased during COVID-19, with significantly more suicides than expected among males, non-Hispanic American Indian/Alaskan Native and Black youth.   Suicide is the second leading cause of death for individuals aged 5-24 years in the United States, and a…

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Mason’s Story: A Less Invasive Solution for Achalasia
Mason’s Story: A Less Invasive Solution for Achalasia 1024 683 Emily Siebenmorgen

A 9-year-old boy with life-long difficulty eating and keeping down food underwent a new procedure being performed in children from Muhammad Khan, MD, MPH, FASGE, pediatric gastroenterologist and the director of interventional and diagnostic endoscopy at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. Achalasia is a progressive swallowing…

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Proof-of-Concept Study Shows Promise of Exon-Skipping Gene Therapy Approach in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy
Proof-of-Concept Study Shows Promise of Exon-Skipping Gene Therapy Approach in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy 1024 575 Lauren Dembeck

Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a devastating progressive muscle-wasting disease that leads to loss of motor and cardiorespiratory function. The disease is caused by mutations in the DMD gene that result in the loss of expression of the dystrophin protein, which plays a critical…

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Nurse caring for infant in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU)
Substantial Variation in Fluid Balance Among Preterm Neonates
Substantial Variation in Fluid Balance Among Preterm Neonates 1024 575 Lauren Dembeck

In neonates, approximately 75 to 90% of the body weight consists of body fluid. The amount varies with gestational age, with higher total body fluid percentages in extremely preterm infants, those born at 22 to 28 weeks of gestation. These extremely preterm infants have…

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toddler brushing teeth
Quality Improvement in Primary Care Improves Dental Utilization and Oral Health Outcomes in Children
Quality Improvement in Primary Care Improves Dental Utilization and Oral Health Outcomes in Children 1024 680 JoAnna Pendergrass, DVM

Quality improvement provides an effective, standardized approach to increasing pediatric dental utilization and improving oral health outcomes in primary care settings. According to a recent study by pediatric dentist David Danesh, DMD, MPH, MS, and his research team at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, children receiving…

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Featured Researcher — Linda Baker, MD
Featured Researcher — Linda Baker, MD 150 150 Natalie Wilson

Linda Baker, MD, a renowned expert in prune belly syndrome (PBS), joined Nationwide Children’s as a research director and principal investigator in the Kidney and Urinary Tract Center and The Ohio State University as a clinical professor of Urology at the end of 2022.…

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Linda Baker, MD
5 Things to Know About Prune Belly Syndrome
5 Things to Know About Prune Belly Syndrome 1024 683 Abbie Miller

Linda Baker, MD, urologist, principal investigator, and one of the world’s foremost experts on prune belly syndrome, recently joined Nationwide Children’s Hospital as the co-director of the Kidney and Urinary Tract Center. She shares some important things to know about this rare disease. 1.…

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Collage of health technology tools
Adding Telehealth Solutions to the Autism Toolbox: What Really Works?
Adding Telehealth Solutions to the Autism Toolbox: What Really Works? 1024 535 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

The COVID-19 pandemic forced autism diagnostics and follow-up care to digital, remote platforms. Now that telehealth is no longer required, what’s worth keeping as a digital service option?   It may be hard to imagine successfully observing a child over video — or even…

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Myopericarditis After COVID-19 Vaccination
Myopericarditis After COVID-19 Vaccination 1024 683 Katie Brind'Amour, PhD, MS, CHES

A meta-analysis of international studies offers more detailed insight into the severity and outcomes of vaccine-related myopericarditis in the adolescent and young adult population. Concerns over myopericarditis and other cardiovascular complications in teens and young adults have gained considerable media attention. While myopericarditis-related data…

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Young child with Cerebral Palsy
New Guidelines for Care of Children With Cerebral Palsy
New Guidelines for Care of Children With Cerebral Palsy 1024 683 Abbie Miller

Guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Academy for Cerebral Palsy and Developmental Medicine highlight advances in diagnosis, care and outcomes for children and adolescents with cerebral palsy. In late 2022, the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Academy for…

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