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Mary Bates, PhD

What is the Association Between Kidney Injury and Fluid Balance in Premature Newborns?
What is the Association Between Kidney Injury and Fluid Balance in Premature Newborns? 1024 575 Mary Bates, PhD
Nurse caring for infant in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU)

A positive fluid balance is associated with acute kidney injury and worse outcomes in a new study of premature infants. According to new research, there is an association between fluid balance and outcomes in preterm newborns, with a negative fluid balance during the first week of life emerging as a potential therapeutic target. Premature infants…

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Kidney Biopsy Analysis Reveals High Risk for Disease in Patients With Sickle Cell Disease
Kidney Biopsy Analysis Reveals High Risk for Disease in Patients With Sickle Cell Disease 1024 732 Mary Bates, PhD

Patients with SCD are at high risk for significant kidney disease. A retrospective study of biopsy findings from the Pediatric Nephrology Research Consortium shows just how high. Kidney damage is a progressive complication of sickle cell disease (SCD), sometimes eventually leading to kidney failure. As the life expectancy of individuals with SCD has improved, the…

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Targeting Alternative RNA Splicing in Pediatric Cancers
Targeting Alternative RNA Splicing in Pediatric Cancers 150 150 Mary Bates, PhD

Targeting alternative RNA splicing in tumor cells could lead to cancer therapies. RNA splicing, the enzymatic process of removing segments of premature RNA to produce mature RNA, is a key regulator of gene expression. Recent studies have identified variations in the transcriptomes of tumors due to alternative splicing changes, in addition to mutations in splicing…

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Link Found Between Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection and Asthma
Link Found Between Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection and Asthma 800 533 Mary Bates, PhD

RSV infection early in life increases risk of subsequent wheezing or asthma. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of hospitalization in infants all over the world. It can lead to serious acute infections, and new research from Nationwide Children’s shows RSV infection can also have long-term health consequences. In a new study, researchers…

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Targeting Cardiac-Related Strokes in Infants
Targeting Cardiac-Related Strokes in Infants 150 150 Mary Bates, PhD

New study describes risk factors for stroke in children with cardiac disease. Advances in surgical techniques and intensive care management have led to an increase in the number of infants surviving with cardiac disease. Unfortunately, children with cardiac disease are at higher risk for experiencing an arterial ischemic stroke. Now, a new study points to…

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A Major Milestone in Cystic Fibrosis Treatment
A Major Milestone in Cystic Fibrosis Treatment 1024 575 Mary Bates, PhD
Illustration of lungs on blue silhouette of upper chest on black background

A triple medication combination could be life-changing for the majority of patients with cystic fibrosis. A Phase III clinical trial shows that elexacaftor added to ivacaftor and tezacaftor improves lung function and quality of life in cystic fibrosis patients with the most common genetic mutation, F508del. The triple therapy, known as Trikafta, could effectively treat 90%…

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Health Care Leaders Offer Interim Guidelines on Vaping and EVALI Care
Health Care Leaders Offer Interim Guidelines on Vaping and EVALI Care 150 150 Mary Bates, PhD

While investigations are ongoing, an interim report offers clinical guidance regarding vaping-associated lung injuries. Centers for Disease Control (CDC), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), state and local health departments, and public health and clinical partners are looking into a multistate outbreak of lung injury associated with the use of electronic cigarette (e-cigarette), or vaping,…

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Cheaper, Generic Drug Just as Effective in Preserving Heart Function in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy
Cheaper, Generic Drug Just as Effective in Preserving Heart Function in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy 150 150 Mary Bates, PhD

A new clinical trial found a cheaper generic drug is effective in protecting the heart in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. A recent clinical trial conducted found a cost-effective generic medication works just as well as a more expensive drug in preserving heart function in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Published in the Journal of the…

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What Can We Learn From the Co-occurrence of a Genetic Disorder and Cancer?
What Can We Learn From the Co-occurrence of a Genetic Disorder and Cancer? 150 150 Mary Bates, PhD

Researchers investigate an unusual case of concurrent genetic and somatic diagnoses. In a new paper in the European Journal of Medical Genetics, researchers from Nationwide Children’s Hospital discuss the case of a 4-year-old with both a rare genetic disorder and medulloblastoma. Genetic analyses allowed them to evaluate the cause of the genetic disorder and provided support…

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How Much Opioid Medication Should Pediatric Orthopedic Patients Receive?
How Much Opioid Medication Should Pediatric Orthopedic Patients Receive? 150 150 Mary Bates, PhD

A study suggests doses could be tailored to each particular patient’s injury. Doctors have traditionally used opioids as the primary component of pain management after orthopedic surgery in pediatric patients. But with the misuse and abuse of prescription opioids a growing public health concern, doctors are looking to limit what they prescribe to the minimum…

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Gene Expression Changes With CFTR Modulator Treatment
Gene Expression Changes With CFTR Modulator Treatment 150 150 Mary Bates, PhD

Patients with cystic fibrosis show transcriptomic changes after starting treatment with lumacaftor/ivacaftor. In a new study, researchers from Nationwide Children’s analyzed the gene expression profiles of cystic fibrosis patients before and after treatment with the drug lumacaftor/ivacaftor. The findings have implications for the evaluation of existing medications as well as the development of new treatments. Care…

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Skin-to-Skin Care Safe for Infants After Surgery
Skin-to-Skin Care Safe for Infants After Surgery 150 150 Mary Bates, PhD

A quality improvement project shows that skin-to-skin care can be safely integrated into the treatment of infants who require surgery. Multiple barriers prevent routine skin-to-skin care for infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), particularly for infants requiring surgical consultation. A recent quality improvement project, published in the Journal of Pediatric Surgery, shows that routine…

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Optimal Use of an FDA-Approved Device for PDA Closure in Infants
Optimal Use of an FDA-Approved Device for PDA Closure in Infants 150 150 Mary Bates, PhD

Randomized, controlled clinical trials are needed to answer questions regarding when and with whom to use the device. In January 2019, the US Food and Drug Administration approved a novel device for patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) closure in infants. The Amplatzer Piccolo Occluder is indicated for catheter-based closure of PDA in infants weighing more than…

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Variation in Functional Measurements of the Left Ventricle
Variation in Functional Measurements of the Left Ventricle 150 150 Mary Bates, PhD

Data from The Pediatric Heart Network Normal Echocardiogram Database show interobserver variability, especially in younger and smaller patients. Echocardiography is the primary tool clinicians have to assess ventricular size and function. Accurate evaluation of the left ventricle is critical in the treatment of patients with congenital and acquired heart disease, as well as other conditions…

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Nation’s First Clinical Trial for Pediatric Stroke Rehabilitation
Nation’s First Clinical Trial for Pediatric Stroke Rehabilitation 1024 575 Mary Bates, PhD
Toddler playing with toys

A novel movement-based therapy is being evaluated in infants who suffered a stroke as newborns or in the womb. Nationwide Children’s Hospital is participating in the nation’s first multicenter pediatric stroke recovery trial. The Phase III clinical trial, called I-ACQUIRE, will evaluate an innovative therapy to increase motor skills in 8-month-old to 24-month-old infants who…

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Understanding the Role of LSD2 in the Molecular Genetics of Ewing Sarcoma
Understanding the Role of LSD2 in the Molecular Genetics of Ewing Sarcoma 150 150 Mary Bates, PhD

Study reveals novel potential drug target for Ewing sarcoma. Ewing sarcoma is a bone-associated tumor of mostly children and young adults. Despite aggressive multi-modal treatment strategies, five-year survival remains at 75% for patients with localized disease and 20% for patients with metastases. “Our laboratory is organized to try to understand how Ewing sarcoma develops at a…

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Patent Ductus Arteriosus Closure: Which Patients and When?
Patent Ductus Arteriosus Closure: Which Patients and When? 150 150 Mary Bates, PhD

New review cites need for randomized clinical trials comparing conservative management, surgery, and catheter-based closure. Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) is a common condition among preterm infants. It increases mortality risk and is linked to harmful long-term outcomes including chronic lung disease, heart failure, and brain injury. Yet the optimal treatment for infants with a PDA…

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Use of Cardiac MRI to Monitor Medical Treatment of Rhabdomyoma
Use of Cardiac MRI to Monitor Medical Treatment of Rhabdomyoma 150 150 Mary Bates, PhD

Case study shows success for medical therapy and MRI monitoring of a cardiac rhabdomyoma. In a new case study, researchers from Nationwide Children’s Hospital report treating cardiac rhabdomyoma in a newborn with an mTOR inhibitor called everolimus. They monitored the tumor’s regression using cardiac MRI. Cardiac rhabdomyoma is a common type of heart tumor in…

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New Ultrasound Technique for Monitoring Liver Disease
New Ultrasound Technique for Monitoring Liver Disease 150 150 Mary Bates, PhD

Ultrasound elastography accurately and noninvasively measures liver fibrosis in patients with short bowel syndrome.

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A Narrowing Gender Gap in Youth Suicides
A Narrowing Gender Gap in Youth Suicides 1024 575 Mary Bates, PhD
Teen girl with backpack

Recent data show a disproportionate increase in the suicide rate among female relative to male youth, highlighting a significant reduction in the historically large gap in suicide rates between sexes.

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Can Brain Imaging Help Predict Bipolar Disorder in High Risk Children?
Can Brain Imaging Help Predict Bipolar Disorder in High Risk Children? 150 150 Mary Bates, PhD

Patterns in connectivity in a portion of the frontal lobe called the inferior frontal gyrus appears to be an early biomarker in children of parents with bipolar disorder. Researchers report a potential neural marker of individual risk in those with a family history of bipolar disorder. The study, published in the journal Neuropsychopharmacology, points to particular…

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Keeping Young Patients With Congenital Heart Disease Connected to Care
Keeping Young Patients With Congenital Heart Disease Connected to Care 150 150 Mary Bates, PhD

Race, type of insurance and severity of disease affect likelihood of experiencing a lapse in care for CHD patients younger than 5 years. Lapse in care is prevalent among congenital heart disease survivors by age five, with nonwhites demonstrating elevated risk, according to a new study from Nationwide Children’s Hospital researchers. Medicaid patients and those…

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Growth Hormone Also Has Metabolic Benefits
Growth Hormone Also Has Metabolic Benefits 150 150 Mary Bates, PhD
Treating Pilonidal Disease with Laser Hair Depilation
Treating Pilonidal Disease with Laser Hair Depilation 150 150 Mary Bates, PhD
Lymphocyte Response After a Burn Predicts Infection
Lymphocyte Response After a Burn Predicts Infection 150 150 Mary Bates, PhD
More Screening Needed for Young Females at Risk for von Willebrand Disease
More Screening Needed for Young Females at Risk for von Willebrand Disease 1024 575 Mary Bates, PhD
Black and white image of teen girl posing outside

A new study finds most girls with heavy menstrual bleeding are not screened for the bleeding disorder. Despite recommendations by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, approximately 90 percent of girls with heavy menstrual bleeding are not being screened for von Willebrand disease, according to a new study from Nationwide Children’s Hospital. “Von Willebrand disease is…

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Improving Feeding and Growth in Children With Cleft Palate
Improving Feeding and Growth in Children With Cleft Palate 1024 575 Mary Bates, PhD
Black and white photo of baby bottle with formula on the table in front of a simple background

Targeted interventions result in improved feeding efficiency and growth in infants with cleft lip and/or palate. Cleft lip and/or palate is a relatively common birth defect that occurs when certain parts of the face and mouth fail to fuse during development. Infants with the condition can struggle to suck or extract liquid from the breast…

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Femoral Nerve Blockade May Reduce Need for Intravenous Opioids
Femoral Nerve Blockade May Reduce Need for Intravenous Opioids 150 150 Mary Bates, PhD

Researchers find no differences in postoperative pain measures for patients receiving intravenous opioids and those receiving regional anesthetic. Femur fractures often require surgical fixes and can be quite painful. Although traditionally treated with intravenous opioids, regional anesthesia may offer an alternative option. In a new study, published in the Journal of Pain Research, researchers evaluated the…

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How to Identify and Treat Blood Clots in Pediatric Patients With Cancer
How to Identify and Treat Blood Clots in Pediatric Patients With Cancer 1024 575 Mary Bates, PhD
Black and white photo of a young patient with cancer wearing a mask and gown and holding an IV poll smiling and giving a thumbs up in the hospital

New guidelines will help doctors recognize and treat children at risk of venous thromboembolism. Prevention of blood clots is well described in adult cancer patients, but data on the problem in pediatric cancer patients is limited. In a new publication initiated at the request of the International Society of Thrombosis and Hemostasis, researchers provide guidance for…

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What Happens When Cancer Remission Is in Question?
What Happens When Cancer Remission Is in Question? 1024 575 Mary Bates, PhD
Photo of leukemia cells under microscope

A new study looks at outcomes for children with leukemia when two tests of remission disagree. In both clinical practice and clinical trials, remission in leukemia is determined by morphological assessment — a person counting cancer cells in a bone marrow sample under a microscope. But more sophisticated technologies, such as flow cytometry or polymerase…

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Large-Scale Genomics Study Identifies Children With High-Risk Cancer
Large-Scale Genomics Study Identifies Children With High-Risk Cancer 150 150 Mary Bates, PhD

Some subtypes of leukemia have a poor prognosis. Genomic studies are helping to identify these subtypes, leading to targeted therapies. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), a malignancy of the white blood cells, is a common childhood cancer. Understanding the genomic changes underlying ALL has led to the development of new, targeted therapies, especially for patients with…

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Making Stem Cell Transplantation Work for Sickle Cell Disease
Making Stem Cell Transplantation Work for Sickle Cell Disease 150 150 Mary Bates, PhD

New regimen offers a promising approach for unrelated donor transplants. Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a blood disorder affecting 1 in every 500 African-American newborns. It is characterized by extreme pain and decreased longevity. Currently, the only cure for SCD lies in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. A well-matched sibling donor is needed for the best…

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How Genes and Environment Interact to Raise Risk of Congenital Heart Defects
How Genes and Environment Interact to Raise Risk of Congenital Heart Defects 150 150 Mary Bates, PhD

Genetic susceptibility plus maternal hyperglycemia interact to contribute to heart defects during fetal development. Infants of mothers with diabetes have a three- to five-fold increased risk of congenital heart defects. Such developmental defects are likely caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. However, the molecular mechanisms by which maternal diabetes disrupts normal heart…

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Different Patterns of Executive Function Deficits in Different Pediatric Brain Disorders
Different Patterns of Executive Function Deficits in Different Pediatric Brain Disorders 150 150 Mary Bates, PhD

Clinical implications include specialized testing for deficits in executive function as these may not be apparent at a routine exam. A large group of researchers, including many from Nationwide Children’s Hospital, recently looked at whether children with different brain disorders show diverse patterns of strengths and weaknesses in executive functions. Children with traumatic brain injuries…

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Combining Immunotherapies Effective Against Mouse Model of Cancer
Combining Immunotherapies Effective Against Mouse Model of Cancer 150 150 Mary Bates, PhD

Recent study results suggest that combining virotherapy and PD-1 blockades may be more effective than either approach alone. Rhabdomyosarcoma, a cancer made up of cells that normally develop into skeletal muscles, is the most common soft tissue cancer in children. If it is detected early and localized in certain areas, rhabdomyosarcoma is usually curable with…

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Balancing Immune Activation and Suppression After Cardiopulmonary Bypass
Balancing Immune Activation and Suppression After Cardiopulmonary Bypass 150 150 Mary Bates, PhD

Understanding how the immune system responds to CPB could dramatically impact postsurgical outcomes. Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) is a relatively routine procedure, generally with favorable outcomes. However, among the risks posed to patients is the over- or under-activation of the immune system following the surgery. Mark Hall, MD, FCCM, division chief of Critical Care at Nationwide Children’s Hospital,…

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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Can Help Children With Persistent Post-Concussive Symptoms
Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Can Help Children With Persistent Post-Concussive Symptoms 150 150 Mary Bates, PhD

A psychological intervention improves kids’ function and quality of life even years after a concussion. For most children and adolescents that experience concussions, symptoms resolve after a week or two. However, a small subset of kids has persistent symptoms lasting for months or even years after the injury. These symptoms can be disruptive and stressful,…

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Why Patients With Diabetes Have More UTIs
Why Patients With Diabetes Have More UTIs 150 150 Mary Bates, PhD

Insulin regulates an antimicrobial peptide that is suppressed in patients with diabetes. A recent study led by clinicians and researchers at Nationwide Children’s Hospital reports a potential explanation for why urinary tract infections (UTIs) are so common in patients with diabetes – insulin regulates an antimicrobial peptide (AMP) that is suppressed in those patients. Patients…

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