SECOND OPINION

Child Health Policy: A Year in Review

In your opinion, what was the most important change--for better or worse--in child health policy in 2014, and why?

4 Responses
Amy L. Dunn, MD
January 6, 2016

I think that the new laws governing narcotic prescribing practices have had a big impact on the hematology population. While the spirit of the law is admirable, to require more clinic visits and prohibit low potency narcotics by phone-in prescription is challenging for our families who have children with chronic pain issues.

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Anup Patel, MD
January 6, 2016

I think the most important change to child health policy in 2014 is the mandate that pre-existing conditions cannot be denied for health insurance. Although it is not a direct child health policy issue, it does benefit many children who are cared for by me, and benefits others with chronic medical conditions. It has offered parents relief and less anxiety.

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Benjamin T. Kopp, MD
January 6, 2016

2014 was a big year for child health, including the recent governmental 2015 Omnibus Appropriations, which will provide increased funding for many programs including global health, the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, and the National Center for Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities. However, policymakers have missed out on possibly the biggest issue of the year, as the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) expires at the end of September 2015.

As medical costs are expected to continue to skyrocket over the coming years, it’s more important than ever that we continue to fund programs like CHIP that help provide medical insurance to our most important commodities: our children. Without coverage for even the most basic medical care, we cannot expect our children to enjoy the changing medical technologies that are continuing to revolutionize care today. That is a change I know they cannot do without!

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Amber Patterson, MD
January 6, 2016

In children with food allergy, early use of epinephrine for life-threatening anaphylaxis to food can make the difference between life and death. Legislation allowing Ohio schools to stock epinephrine autoinjectors was an incredibly important step towards ensuring early access and treatment of life-threatening allergic reactions.

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